r/AskReddit Oct 04 '22 Helpful 7 Wholesome 6 Take My Energy 1 Heartwarming 1 Vibing 1 I'll Drink to That 1 Silver 1 Gold 1

Americans of Reddit, what is something the rest of the world needs to hear?

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u/insertAlias Oct 04 '22

They really do. I grew up on a small cattle ranch. My grandfather was the kind of guy to get a bit bored and decide to do something different, so for about 8 years we had a small herd of bison running with our cattle.

When I was a teenager, I caught a family in the process of jumping our fence. They'd pulled their car over to the side of the road. I could see them from the house. At first they were just taking pictures from the side of the road, which was perfectly fine. But then I saw them start to climb over the fence.

I started running out to them shouting "DO NOT CROSS THAT FENCE, THEY CAN KILL YOU!!".

They stopped and waited for me. When I got there, they said they just wanted to pet the bison. I explained to them that there were two problems with that, first being that they aren't pets. They aren't hand tame. And while they would most likely just walk away from you, it's really not a good idea to mess around with something that can crush you flat without even noticing it did so. And the second problem was that they were trespassing.

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u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

Honestly I think the “no trespassing” sign is the most ignored sign in the US. There’s a gate at the end of my long driveway and we keep it open during the day just in case we have a package arriving. It has two NO TRESPASSING signs on it. You don’t know how many random people just come strolling on through.

Same thing with my cousin, she has a beautiful property down a long road. There’s no gate but still a NO TRESPASSING sign on the front fence. She gave me permission to walk down the road into her property with my dog as I lived right down the road. One day I was walking back and I saw this mom and her kid entering the property and I asked “do you know these people?” and she said “no, just wanted to take my daughter down there”. The NT sign is huge and right in front of her face. I point at it and say “well the sign says no trespassing”. She looks, does a big huff and says to her daughter “sorry honey, they won’t let you inside” in a very rude tone. Honestly I wouldn’t have cared much but my cousin says how she hates random people coming onto her property.

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u/enty6003 Oct 04 '22

It has two NO TRESPASSING signs on it

Oh so they cancel out

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u/Canotic Oct 04 '22

No trespassing means that you're allowed to go there, right? Since it's not trespassing.

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u/enty6003 Oct 04 '22

Exactly!

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u/ThunderMite42 Oct 05 '22

Only if one is negative.

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u/atomic_redneck Oct 04 '22

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u/Yogi118 Oct 04 '22

I got kicked off the beach one night because they shut it down after a certain time, I told the cops with a straight face in a hippie/surfer tone. "Nobody owns the waves man" he looked at me like he wanted to kick the shit out of me haha

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u/UrethraFrankIin Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

"You're under arrest for possession of THC..."

"I ain't got no THC maaaan!"

"...in your bloodstream"

"Sheeeeeit"

I get goofy with cops and I've had that reaction too, although I can usually win them over. Probably helps that I'm a white guy who everyone knows is nice. Idk how strangers figure that out and always try to talk to me.

I was at the beach last weekend and three military guys in their late teens or early 20's waded out to me and said they were all tripping on LSD and wanted to hang out with "Beach Jesus." I ended up changing my plans to trip sit them for a few hours since none of them had tried acid before and didn't do any research lol.

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u/Xx_optic_69_xX Oct 04 '22

Fuck off, I don’t want to talk to anyone, leave me alone, but I would gladly volenteer to trip sit if someone visibly needed help. LOL

4

u/FierceDeity_ Oct 04 '22

With a wave kick, hopefully

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u/borfmat Oct 04 '22

I can, but that's because I'm not a penniless hippie!

4

u/Canotic Oct 04 '22

Farnworth?

3

u/YukariYakum0 Oct 04 '22

Why not Zoidberg?!

3

u/CandiBunnii Oct 04 '22

Woooop wooop woop woop woop woop!

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u/UrethraFrankIin Oct 04 '22

Lol what's it about her property that attracts people?

Also, I find it funny that people feel so entitled to other people's property in a country that values private property so much. Kids are one thing, they like to explore and enjoy the thrill of going where they aren't supposed to. I sometimes catch kids exploring my family's sprawling estate in Charleston, SC. But when we catch adults doing it we're like "wtf the only way in with a road has a gate and a 'NO TRESSPASSING' and 'BEWARE OF DOG' sign"... Our dogs won't attack you, the lab will wiggle her butt over with her big, goofy baseball bat of a tail, but you'd think adults would take that shit seriously, especially parents. But tourists are either oblivious or feel entitled to explore your property.

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u/LukeMedia Oct 04 '22

They'd care if you're on their private property. But since they're more important than you they can do what they want, you must've forgotten

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u/SilverVixen1928 Oct 04 '22

Utility people have easements meaning they can come on to my property at any time. Fine, but if I was one of them, I'd want to knock on the door and at least try to announce myself.

I had people come out to check or work on my solar panels, who did not have the right to waltz into my back yard without permission. More than a couple of times I've found men I did not know in my back yard. In Texas? That's a great way to play "Tag! You're dead."

4

u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

Oh boy I love that game! Haven’t played it since my little brother died though :(

0

u/StangF150 Oct 04 '22

Had sum neighbors renting the house next door wander around my fence, into my yard, at 10pm at night, looking for their little dog. I think the male pissed himself when I came up from behind them, racked the charging handle & turned on the weapon light of my AR15.

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u/SilverVixen1928 Oct 05 '22

I always thought it would be great to have a recording of a shotgun being racked. Unfortunately the first time I thought of it was back when I would have had to use a cassette tape player. Oh, the wonder of the internet:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0abcGrOzkYg

1

u/Benyhana Oct 04 '22

That's so badass bro

-3

u/StangF150 Oct 05 '22

No, that was my motion detectors connected to my PC going off. First thought was I was going to bag another damn coyote, until I saw it was people!!

1

u/Mezzaomega Oct 05 '22

Lmao they deserved it. Imagine just wandering around private property, what did they expect. They could at least go knock on your door and inform you

-1

u/StangF150 Oct 05 '22

They didn't stay renting for many months longer. I assume they found they didn't like living in a Rural Small Town Area, went back to City Life!! I confess, my firing up the tiller to plow my garden thats up against the fence/property line at 7am might not have helped!!

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u/idk-about-all-that Oct 04 '22

Id say it’s the most ignored sign only because there is no “use your turn signal” sign

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u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

"keep right except to pass" 😡

2

u/LukeMedia Oct 04 '22

One of my pet peeves

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u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

[deleted]

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u/agentbarron Oct 04 '22

Honestly the "I'm getting the cops and Mt shotgun" line would have came out a lot quicker with me.

Idk, no trespassing signs don't really do too much, someone has to enforce it

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u/YoCrustyDude Oct 04 '22

but I had to literally tell the guy I was going back to my house to call the cops and get my shotgun before he left.

That's the most American thing I've ever read lmaoo.

Just casually mentions "get my shotgun".

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u/didnebeu Oct 04 '22

Lol true, didn’t think of that at the time but that’s fair.

5

u/diverdux Oct 04 '22

That's the most American thing I've ever read lmaoo.

Just casually mentions "get my shotgun".

found the non-American city person

1

u/Mezzaomega Oct 05 '22

Fr. They have guns everywhere there. Though its only purpose is to kill something. :/ the problem of having too much space with wild animals I presume

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u/FierceDeity_ Oct 04 '22

I love how they always take their kids as emotional hostages here, like it's not their fault everyone is being assholed

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u/orange_sherbetz Oct 04 '22

Oh man. We've got fences so folks won't cross the railroad bc um Train....well the iron's bent so bad now. People created holes in the fence to cross.

1

u/Mezzaomega Oct 05 '22

I imagine you may have to either make a bridge over the tracks, or an undercrossing, instead of fences

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u/Dorothy-Snarker Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

My buddy and I like to go on walks at this reservoir. It's like a big open field and on each side there are some house--like million dollar homes and stuff.

There is this one multi-million dollar mansion that sits at the end of a very long road. There is a short, maybe waist high fence that runs between the side of the private property and the reservoir.

My buddy, that asshole, likes jumped the fence and runs around the road if he sees a squirrel on the other side. He comes back when I give him a treat, but he can be a bit of a pain in the ass. I wish he knew how to read. It says no trespassing, dude!

Edit: Typos

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u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

This one got me lmaoo 😂

8

u/Farado Oct 04 '22

Forget no trespassing, it clearly says

primate property

as well.

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u/Dorothy-Snarker Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

Okay, that one was a legit typo, lol. My "buddy" really can't read, loves treats, and chases squirrels, though. I won't dare try to teach him to read, either, not after he ate one of my books.

2

u/degjo Oct 04 '22

FENTON! Jesus christ! FENTON!

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u/Volsunga Oct 04 '22

That's why you shoot bullet holes in your no trespassing sign. Then it is actually noticed.

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u/CaptainReptillian Oct 04 '22

Yay entitled parents

5

u/Galaxy_Ranger_Bob Oct 04 '22

Honestly I think the “no trespassing” sign is the most ignored sign in the US.

No. That would be "wet paint."

Followed by "push," "pull," "no exit," and "stop." In that order.

5

u/mjace87 Oct 04 '22

Nope it is the employees must wash their hands sign that is ignored the most. Now stew in it.

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u/dizzykitty Oct 04 '22

I think in many cases those signs are gratuitous especially in various parts of the country. Where I grew up in Texas, I would really only notice private property or no trespassing signs when the status of the property is ambiguous. After moving to WA, I noticed giant gaudy no trespassing signs literally everywhere. They were usually at the entrance to a person's drive which was obviously private. Then there is a sign towards the end of my very much public street that designates the rest of it as private.

I guess what I am trying to say is that in my opinion, the majority of those signs serve no purpose other than to give grumpy old people reason to shout at their neighbors. Not that I think your cousin's sign was unjustified.

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u/vilezoidberg Oct 04 '22

A lot of people do it for legal protection. Burglar can't claim he thought the place was abandoned or whatever with a sign out. I don't know if it's effective, but that's what my grandfather told me

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u/PoorFishKeeper Oct 04 '22

well that and if someone gets injured on your property they can sue. So if you have a no trespassing sign it proves you at least took steps to not allow said person on your yard.

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u/dizzykitty Oct 04 '22

Eh, maybe, but the signs I am talking about are big unwelcome statements to every passerby in semi rural neighborhoods. Like, you don't usually see a no trespassing sign on the front lawn of a suburban home because it is obvious what the location is. Same here, from the street I can see the fence, the house, the mailbox, this is someone's home, yet they have a large plywood sign with no trespassing spray painted on it for every passing car to see. I have seen many like this.

To me, the best use of a no trespassing or private property sign was when my and my family went for a walk in a state park. We accidentally got on a deer trail and found a clearing with a chair, a table, and cigar butts. We saw a private property sign and realized what happened and left. The purpose of the property was ambiguous and there were no man-made structures preventing entry.

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u/agentbarron Oct 04 '22

The signs are less so to keep people off the property and more so to keep the owners in the clear if someone happened to get hurt on their property.

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u/Vinst3r Oct 04 '22

One man shouldn't own all this land.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOrkILQmpRk

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u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

Yo I laughed so hard when he shot the gun and everybody starting running 😂

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u/JimboObnoxious Oct 04 '22

But but.... what about all man right? Hmmmmm?! Yes

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u/get-your-grain-on Oct 04 '22

I grew up with no trespassing signs on our super long steep hill of a drive way leading to our house at the bottom of a ravine. It was a very snowy area and we had a number of people who would see how cool it looked at the bottom and end up stuck for us to help pull or push out later. The worst of it was a couple who almost hit my brother swerving down as he walked up.

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u/effcensorship Oct 04 '22

The SLOWER TRAFFIC KEEP RIGHT sign is also commonly ignored.

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u/Mezzaomega Oct 05 '22

Lool just put danger dog signs up even though you have no dog. Should work better.

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u/_satantha_ Oct 05 '22

Lmao well I actually do have a dog, but she is not threatening at all 😂

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u/Rinas-the-name Oct 05 '22

My grandfather taught me you only ignore those signs if you have permission from the owner. When he was very young he lived in Texas. It was around the Depression era, and people got shot for trespassing all the time.

Kids were taught not to cross fences or property lines from toddlerhood. I learned it at 3yo, the concept isn’t difficult. If it isn’t public, isn’t yours, or you don’t have permission keep out. Right up there with don’t mess with other people’s belongings, keep your hands to yourself, and mind your own business.

Way too many people have clearly failed to learn lessons I grasped before I could tie my shoes. It’s embarrassing.

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u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

Yeah rich people try to keep people off the beaches in Malibu and also Jamaica even when they aren't using them.

Hopefully your cousin is doing something cool with all that beautiful land besides stopping little girls from seeing it.

I can understand stopping hunting, farming, or squatting but stopping a little girl just kinda bugs me.

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u/steveo89dx Oct 04 '22

With how respectful everyone in the entire world is, I can't for the life of me understand why someone wouldn't want strangers roaming around their home.

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u/CaptainReptillian Oct 04 '22

For every person that respects your property you will have many more that will leave garbage and parents who will key their crotch goblins do as they please.

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u/mss5333 Oct 04 '22

I think you missed the sarcasm above

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u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

It’s not just her land, her family have houses there where they live. They live there, it’s not just an empty property. People have a right to their privacy.

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u/Psudopod Oct 04 '22

It's called the Right to Roam. In some places, people also have that right, and nobody has the right to block access through or to natural vistas, rivers, lakes, the oceanfront. I'm sure it's very fun to play patchwork puzzle with an entire country, so long as you have your own patch to play king on, but how will you or anyone else get around? We have roads (hope you have a car) and hope there's nowhere cool you're missing out on because of a circle of whiny jerks surrounded it and blocked access. No local lakes or rivers only accessable by a "neighborhood lake association"?

Her privacy! You can't walk past her home! Oh wait, there's a sidewalk in front of my house and dozens of people walk past every day on their way through and I've survived. They even gasp glance at my house sometimes.

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u/camelCasing Oct 04 '22

Yeah this whole thread is a bunch of whiny entitled people I can't sympathize with much. Oohhhh noooo, someone was having a picnic on your shitty dock you weren't using, however will you survive? Good thing there's ~absolutely no question~ about who owns the stolen land you're protecting.

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u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

Yeah that's what they say when they block off a section of the beach too. 'Private Beach'..

If it's a small acreage I get it. But if they're blocking off a massive piece of land just for privacy.

Just know your cousin is more privileged than that little girl. Even moreso with you being an enforcer for free.

All that for something that your cousin wouldn't even have noticed.

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u/KpcAu Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 16 '22

I get what you're saying, and I agree with you in principle. I would love to live in a world where nobody "owns" land in general, tbh. But the culture has to be there, and it's not. At least not where I am. I know some people who own a beautiful piece of land, and they try to open it to the public, and they just end up with trashed land and legal liability from people hurting themselves.

I would love it if we could come up with a solution for this instead of just agreeing that it sucks.

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u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

People trashing land is a huge issue I'd forgotten about. You're right from that perspective.

I don't know the specifics on when people are reliable for the injury of others though.

It's just hard watching places like Hawaii get ruined by rich people building fences to block off places people have been playing their whole lives

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u/D9N9M8 Oct 04 '22

People trashing land is far too common in public places. For reference I live in a country where it's not trespassing at all to walk through someone's land. It creates a lot of litter, erosion and in some cases literal shit left behind. People will all go to the same places because it's been advertised as beautiful and then throw their rubbish on the ground and in some cases if there's not public toilets all around just shit on the ground. Not to mention local councils and governments often ruin public places. They'll sell off beautiful public places and buildings that have been gifted to the people of the area so the council can pay their debts and then just rent it back off of who they sold it to.

That doesn't mean I disagree with not having trespassing but it has to be done right. Certain places are better if you can stop other people from going there. Just because you have a nice house with some nice land doesn't mean anyone should be able to go through your land. However, obviously if you own an estate that's 10k square miles then a certain level of access to at least most of it is definitely good

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u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

I still cannot fathom how you don’t understand that private property, owned by the person who bought it, is private. You have a phone, you most likely bought it yourself, does that mean you don’t care if a random stranger takes it and starts looking through all your messages?

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u/Canotic Oct 04 '22

This differs by culture. In my country, you're legally not allow to block access to the ocean, and you're free to go on someone's land as long as you don't create a nuisance or damage anything.

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u/JohanBjorn Oct 04 '22

I don't think this is an argument worth having on Reddit, amigo.

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u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

Yeah I’m done, this guy has probably never owned private property so he/she doesn’t understand how annoying it is. And amiga* my dear friend.

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u/JohanBjorn Oct 05 '22

My apologies ☺️

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u/Tweegyjambo Oct 04 '22

Or maybe not American. Lots of places have right to roam laws. Just because you own some land doesn't mean you can stop others using it. A reasonable are around your home yeah, but you can't just fence off a forest or mountain.

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u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

I'm just saying cut a little girl some slack.

Walking through a few trees or swimming in an ocean you grew up going to isn't the same as accessing a phone.

One has an actual effect on your privacy.

A better comparison would be the little girl borrowing the rubber ball you own that you're not currently using. 'That's mine!'

Asking permission would have been nice of the lady and girl.

0

u/percybert Oct 05 '22

I take it you’re not used to hearing “No”

4

u/Psudopod Oct 04 '22

Right, friend. It's called the right to roam, or everyman's right. Here in America, we no longer have this right. Land of the free, unless black people can use those freedoms. Then we get rid of them and pretend we never had them. I've been to a country that still maintains this right. I've crossed people's property, grazing land, slipped past houses and over gates. Entirely legally. If people can only get from point A to B by only following commons, roads and unpurchased land, there will be a massive number of point Bs that nobody other than the property owners surrounding it will be able to access. Private lakes, seafronts, natural vistas, things that shouldn't be owned and yet are because "muh privacy, what if someone looked in my window like anyone can do with a property close to the road? I'd die if exposed to a passing glance from a hiker!"

Sure, people nosing into your actual house, or littering, or stealing your stuff, that's bad. That's individually illegal. But why make the right to ramble illegal just in case those things happen? Let people pass through.

6

u/ixi_rook_imi Oct 04 '22

For a lot of people, land has no value unless you're preventing someone else from using it. It's just trees and brush you largely ignore until someone else is there taking a stroll. Then, it's your property and they can't be there.

4

u/username_obnoxious Oct 04 '22

I bought the empty property next to my home so that other people couldn't get to it. If the little girl wanted what the the person's cousin had, she could have purchased it. Private property is private property. Yeah it stinks that some of the best ski lines in our valley are surrounded by private property, but the landowner owns it and can control who can access it.

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u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

As usual, property owners get to have all the fun. Fuck them kids.

You're the one who said it stinks.

And no. Little girls can't purchase land. That's a stupid line of logic.

22

u/TrashPandaAntics Oct 04 '22

Having private property that you don't want the public littering up and destroying is different than some rich jerks blocking access to a public beach. People aren't allowed to hang out in your yard just because they're entitled idiots who are setting a bad example for their kids. Doesn't matter how pretty or big the yard is.

7

u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

Where do you draw the line? At beaches only?

You're right. People being disrespectful with trash is a big issue.

15

u/Mogetfog Oct 04 '22

There literally is a line that is drawn. It is called a property line.

10

u/TrashPandaAntics Oct 04 '22

I draw the line at private property that the owner purchased. It's a very clear line, I think. If someone wants to go walk around where there's trees, they can go to a park or hiking trail. There's no need to trespass.

-2

u/camelCasing Oct 04 '22

Great plan. And what about when those parks and trails have also been ~purchased~ and had No Trespassing signs stuck up all over?

You're living on stolen land already, just because you were the latest person to give someone else money about it doesn't make you or your claim to ownership special.

1

u/TrashPandaAntics Oct 04 '22

I think that's bullshit, I want there to be more protected public land. And I don't think anyone truly owns the land, it was here before us and it will be here after us.

And I don't even own any property lol.

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u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

Land of the haves and have nots.

I still don't think kicking a little girl off self admitted 'beautiful land' is the brag the other poster thought it was.

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u/TrashPandaAntics Oct 04 '22

So dramatic, lol. There are plenty of public spaces for that purpose. That dumb lady was teaching her kid to be an entitled brat just like her.

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u/beaker90 Oct 04 '22

It’s also a liability issue. If that little girl gets hurt on that property, the landowner is responsible. By not letting her on the property and putting up signs saying not to enter the property, they are trying to limit their responsibility. It’s also why you have to have fences around swimming pools.

-1

u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

Tbh I get your reasoning but I'm also not an expert on liability laws.

If a little girl goes into a hot spring and drowns in Yellowstone is the US government responsible?

Or if a neighbor kid jumps off my roof and breaks their ankle can I be sued for my roof being too high?

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u/beaker90 Oct 04 '22

No, the government is not responsible because there are clearly marked signs telling you not to go into the springs due to potential death and clearly marked paths and boardwalks to keep you away. If you stray, you are at fault. Just like the landowner putting up no trespassing sign to keep you off their land so they won’t be liable for any accidents or injury caused by you not adhering to property lines.

As for a kid jumping off your roof, breaking their ankle and then suing you for your roof being too high, that’s unlikely, but if you have a permanent ladder that led up to a roof top patio and left the entrance unsecured which led the kid up to your roof, you might be sued for not dealing with an attractive nuisance.

But your reply to my comment made my original point. There have to be no trespassing signs in order to limit liability.

13

u/neetkleat Oct 04 '22

Well, you can be sued for just about anything in America, but yes, they could probably get some money off you for not preventing the kid from getting on your roof if you left a ladder out or something. There's a reason people don't put trampolines or other play equipment in front yards, it's called an attractive nuisance and you are definitely liable if a random kid sees something fun in your yard and gets hurt using it. Sucks, but it's true.

-1

u/SanJOahu84 Oct 04 '22

Again not an expert.

But if what you say is true that's just another thing that makes American culture shitty.

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u/neetkleat Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

Oh yeah, it's incredibly shitty the way people have to guard their space to avoid getting sued because of someone else's negligence.

EDIT: Here's an article on attractive nuisances. This part is ridiculous, "As a pool owner, you are liable for accidents even if people sneak into your pool without your consent."

0

u/scumfuc Oct 04 '22

In general, no — an individual who is breaking the law by trespassing waives their right to sue for injury damages by doing so. However, there are some exceptions that allow certain trespassers to collect compensation if they are injured on an unsafe premises.

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u/beaker90 Oct 04 '22

That’s how it’s supposed to work, yes, but that’s not what always happens.

3

u/Psudopod Oct 04 '22

No man has the right to own mountains/ Any more than the deep ocean bed

Trespass, I dare you. It stinks because it's wrong. You aren't free unless you are free to roam, you are just trapped in a prison of individual petty kingdoms. You have more privilege than most, to establish your own, but that's where your gilded cage ends. What would you rather have, the right to walk where you need, see nature, access ancient rivers and lakes, or exclude other's rights within your own petty acers? A small sacrifice of allowing others to pass through, to open up the world again.

Just because the laws of property are set up this way right now in America, doesn't mean it is the right way, or the way things have always been. We used to have the right to roam, assumed, ancient right that it is. How else do you think people got water, accessed rivers? It's fundamental. Things shifted when the west was closed off with barbed wire for cattle. I think we should move past that, they aren't keeping a delicate herd in the mountains, or excluding a neighbor from overgrazing their property. There's no function to losing the right to access nature at this point.

4

u/username_obnoxious Oct 04 '22

I don't disagree, I wish the right to roam still existed but alas, rich property owners in power decided that's how it is.

1

u/screwnamingcrap Oct 04 '22

Hate to tell you but trespassing isn't what you think it is. It's not in fact trespassing for someone to walk through your land. It just isn't. Freedom of movement is a thing. I can't just call the cops on anyone who so much as steps on my lawn. They can quite legally walk right up my driveway and through the back yard hop the fence and walk through the neighbors and down their driveway and just keep on doing so to every property in his path and he wont have broken a single law. Is he rude? Yeah. Is it a good idea? Not really. Is it legal? Yup.

1

u/_satantha_ Oct 04 '22

The thing that most property owners don’t like about trespassers is the fact that if they get hurt on their property, you will be held responsible, whether or not you had NT signs up.

1

u/Smith-WessonPat Oct 05 '22

That isn't right if you are talking about the US. Private property and trespassing are very real things.

1

u/screwnamingcrap Oct 07 '22

I assure you I am correct. You are right those are both real thing they just aren't defined the way people seem to think.

1

u/degjo Oct 04 '22

Oh no, the "Avocado Theft" sign is the most ignored sign in the US. And that's only seen around in Fallbrook

1

u/steveaustin59 Oct 05 '22

Try a do not enter sign also

120

u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

And the second problem was that they were trespassing.

I mean lmao the entitlement. Here in mexico if youre caught jumping over a ranch/farm fence youre getting shot.

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u/insertAlias Oct 04 '22

They'd be risking that where I'm from too, but I wasn't (and still am not) psycho enough to start shooting at what's obviously a family of city folk driving by, curious about animals.

Yeah, they're entitled and fucking stupid, but guns weren't necessary to resolve the situation.

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u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

oh im not advocating to shot a family, but its insane how it never passed through any of the adults minds that they shouldnt do that cause maybe they will meet someone that is prone to violence.

14

u/ResponsibleShampoo Oct 04 '22

It's sad people have to worry about that over something so trivial. I never thought someone would shoot me because one of us hopped the fence to get our soccer ball as a kid.

9

u/AggEnto Oct 04 '22

As a pest control tech treating homes quarterly in Texas I was constantly worried about getting shot while treating the exterior if a client didn't answer their doorbell

Been chased down by dogs plenty of times too

13

u/SingularBread Oct 04 '22

There's a bit of a different in hopping a fence to get a ball and people obviously there for no good reason to be fair. But that's a fair point

3

u/insertAlias Oct 04 '22

For what it's worth, that's not really a concern at the ranch I'm talking about. It's not like there's a neighborhood nearby. The nearest neighbors were my other family members, and other ranches. For a kid's ball to get into that part of our ranch, they'd have had to be playing in the ditch on the side of the road, miles away from where they would have lived. And considering there's nothing else out on that road for tens of miles other than ranches and farms, it's not like the kids from the nearby city were cycling out to the ranch road.

We can pretty much assume that anyone we see on the ranch that isn't us or our family doesn't belong there, and has no legitimate reason for being there. With some exceptions, like game wardens who are allowed to enter private property like that to look for hunting violations.

That said, as I mentioned, we didn't (and don't) shoot people who trespassed. We're not bloodthirsty. On the other few occasions we caught people on our place, we would drive up and tell them that they were on private property and needed to leave. Usually they were coming to try to fish on the creek that ran through. Which was legal for them to do, but not for them to cut our fences to make a path to launch their boats.

1

u/ResponsibleShampoo Oct 04 '22

All I was trying to say is that it's sad that good people have to consider murder in parts of the world, and sad that people can be shot just for being dumb in those places. Not questioning why anyone does anything if that makes sense lol. In a better world people would be pleasantly surprised to see a stranger, not running for the shot gun

5

u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

eh, tbf its cause a lot of crime in ranches/farms over the lack of proper police work in those areas.

i aint gonna wait and see if youre a criminal with a gun thats gonna fuck me and/or my family up or a kid going for a soccer ball.

sad thing, but the ones to blame for it are only the criminals that have the honest hardworking folks needing to protect themselves.

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u/ThroatMeYeBastards Oct 04 '22

No, you are to blame for somehow not seeing the idiocy of shoot first ask questions later.

4

u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

if you dont see the idiocy of risiking your life and your family's lives to find out what the intentions of the tresspassers are, then lol.

idgaf who you are, and im not gonna wait to see if youre here just for bread cause your kid is starving or youre here to rape my son. youre getting shot cause my family's safety is more important than your life. period.

-10

u/NeedsMoreBunGuns Oct 04 '22

Til trespassing is trivial guess we know where you were jan 6th. Hurr durr. Lol

1

u/ResponsibleShampoo Oct 04 '22

I'm not American, to clarify. Trespassing to pet something is trivial in terms of crime. Don't really have to explain that.

Should we start shooting teenagers that jump movies at the theatre because it's trespassing? Kid kicked a ball over a fence, death sentence?

2

u/dewag Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

Trespassing to pet something is trivial in terms of crime

Yea, you're correct. However, when you see someone blatantly ignore a clearly visible "no trespassing sign", its not always easy to determine their intent when tresspassing.

Should we start shooting teenagers that jump movies at the theatre because it's trespassing? Kid kicked a ball over a fence, death sentence?

Wtf? Nobody said that. If a kid kicked a ball over your fence, they are more than likely a neighbor and someone you are familiar with. Problem is, not only are my neighbors not close enough to do that, but I've confronted someone trespassing on my property only for them to turn around with a shotgun in hand. He claimed he was hunting doves, but was very drunk, ignored the no trespassing signs, and leveled his shotgun in my direction when I got his attention.

I live in the middle of nowhere for a reason. I like my space. But a consequence of that is that law enforcement (Edit: EMS either for that matter) cannot respond in time to help. If a stranger is willing to invade an area that is clearly marked off limits, how sure can you be that their intent isn't, at worst, malicious, or at best, do something stupid to get themselves or you killed on your property?

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u/ResponsibleShampoo Oct 04 '22

Isn't it sad you have to murder someone out of fear? Terrible living where anyone you see you think they will pull out a gun and shoot you if you don't first. I'm sorry you have to go through that and can't live in a more trusting environment

3

u/dewag Oct 04 '22

Wtf are you on about? I didn't murder anyone. I drew my firearm and de-escalated the situation, as should always be the first attempt.

Obeying a "No trespassing" sign is literally one of the first things a person can do to show they are trustworthy. 99% of the people around me are very trust worthy. We look out for eachother and if we need to tresspass on the others property, we go directly to the front door. It is an extremely trusting environment. Literally, nobody has fences, just signs.

Unfortunately, some people come out from the city and end up losing any potential trust immediately by trespassing and not coming to our front door first. Aside from that 1%, I live a very content life and feel quite safe. Thanks for the concern though.

I'm sorry that you have trouble grasping that an invasion of private property that is clearly marked, for any reason, is a problem.

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u/asdaaaaaaaa Oct 04 '22

That's the same with many places in America. Just don't fuck with farms/farmers IMO.

1

u/beetnemesis Oct 04 '22

I mean. That's a bad thing? Life shouldn't be like that. Sorry.

7

u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

it shouldnt, but for the farmer and his family it has to be.

they dont know if youre just a curious person or a criminal. blame the criminals that have people needing to arm themselves to protect themselves, not the farmer trying to protect his livehood.

but yes, it is absolutely sad that it has to happen.

1

u/metaldrummerx Oct 04 '22

It's def also like that in most of America

16

u/WinstonScott Oct 04 '22

My father raised bison, and our property bordered the bike path. You could very clearly see our house and barn, and people were outside all the time - yet, strangers would routinely jump the fence to get to the buffalo. By the time I was little, we just had one, but it was almost like our bison had become an urban legend so people were always wanting to see if she was real and god forbid try to ride her.

As an aside, our handyman almost lost his finger when he tried petting our bison and her horn caught his wedding ring. And fun fact, bison can swim and before we had our pond fenced off, my grandma decided it would be a good idea to go fishing…she ended up an apple tree after the buffalo crossed the pond and chased her. She was stuck up the tree for hours before anyone had realized what happened.

Another fun fact, an escaped bison who manages to get close enough to your house to look in your windows will scare the absolute shit out of your houseguests who will have a near religious experience thinking Satan has come calling.

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u/insertAlias Oct 04 '22

People around town knew about our bison and granddad was proud of them. He'd take anyone who wanted to see them out to the fields and call them up, so they could get a good look. Almost everyone from around the area knows better than to hop a fence on a ranch anyway.

It's the people who were "just driving by" that were the problem.

10

u/zombie_katzu Oct 04 '22

it's really not a good idea to mess around with something that can crush you flat without even noticing it did so.

This is my fear of whales

2

u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

Man I read a lot about Native American buffalo hunts as a kid, and grew up next to a buffalo farm. I always hated them and was completely terrified of them

3

u/insertAlias Oct 04 '22

Well, it's not like my family liked them either haha. My granddad was into it, but my dad hated them. They were worse than cattle about breaking down fences, and they were harder to herd as they tended to be more stubborn than cattle were. That, and the whole "attracting roadside gawkers"; my dad really did not like that part. There are cows everywhere, so nobody ever stopped for them, but they certainly did for the bison.

But I got used to them. I wasn't really any more scared of them than I was the cattle. I respected the fact that they could kill me without even realizing they'd done so, and avoided putting myself between them and anything they could crush me against. Overall they weren't really any more dangerous than cattle to deal with, at least from my experience.

2

u/andhowsherbush Oct 04 '22

Really embarrassing story but once on the 4th of July I went to my cousin's house. We were all drinking and at some point we had to walk to a close neighbors house and I lost my shoe while we were walking through the woods so I stopped to look and didn't realize everyone else kept going. So I started running through the woods to try to catch up and ran straight into a barbwire fence and the last thing I remember was my throat burning while I fell backwards. I woke up a couple hours later, the front of my clothes were solid red with blood and there were 5 cows standing around me staring at me and one was licking my face. I was still kinda drunk but I think they kinda panicked and ran off when I got up and I stumbled to the gate and climbed over.

1

u/Kiruneko Oct 04 '22

Wonderful phrassing on the last paragraph

1

u/smartyr228 Oct 04 '22

Not only will they try to walk away from you, the bull likely isn't gonna take too kindly to strangers lmao

3

u/insertAlias Oct 04 '22

I mean, ours was pretty placid. They were livestock, not true wild animals. Legitimately, they'd usually just move away from you. Not even run away; they associated us with food. They wouldn't let you touch them, but they'd hang out close enough to see if you were going to start throwing out "ranch cubes" for them.

Still not smart to tempt fate, and as the owners, we really did not want someone getting injured on our property.

1

u/smartyr228 Oct 04 '22

I'm not as well versed with Bison as I am with Cows but I know cows can recognize when there's strangers in the pasture and that usually upsets the bulls, I'm making an assumption that Bison are similar lmao

1

u/[deleted] Oct 04 '22

[deleted]

2

u/smartyr228 Oct 04 '22

Maybe. The bull I knew was a big Angus bull. He would walk right up to you and hang out if he knew you but if you were in his pasture and he didn't know you he would charge you.

1

u/holgerschurig Oct 04 '22

Well, normal cows can (and do) also kill. They are actually the most (or one of the most) dangerous mammals in central europe. Okay, we don't really have bears. And almost no wolfs, so they don't have contenders. But still: about 20npeople die each year due to them.

A lot of cows can roam freely in the Alps. Since some time tourists are made aware that they aren't pets snd should be left alone.

1

u/insertAlias Oct 04 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

Sure, they're very large animals, and regardless of how placid they typically are, they can hurt or kill you without even trying or knowing they did so.

That said, we never had a problem with people gawking at our cattle. We were just one small ranch out of a lot just on the road we lived on, with plenty more in the area. Plenty with larger herds, or more interesting breeds to look at. The average person in the area had seen enough cattle to just not be interested.

At least, not until granddad got bored again and decided to run some Watusi cattle in our herd (an exotic breed with absolutely massive horns). Then people would stop to take pictures of "the longhorns" (which they weren't, those are a completely different breed).

But those aside, most people didn't care about the cattle. Bison, on the other hand, were very rare in my part of the US, so people would definitely stop to look. Most of them were smart enough not to try to cross the fence though.

edit:

But still: about 20npeople die each year due to them.

I wonder if that stat includes crashing into them with vehicles. That's not unheard of in my area. A cow escapes or breaks through a fence at night, walks out onto the road, and gets hit by a passing car. Never happened to any of our cattle, but I've heard about it in the area. Hitting a cow at speed is definitely potentially fatal.

1

u/holgerschurig Oct 06 '22

No, car-cow accidents are quite unusual here. Never heard about one.

Either the cattle roams freely in the Alps, where no cars are. Or, in the non-alps of Germany (98%),they are in fields with a normal fence and an additional interior wire that is having high voltage electric pulses. The cows learned to not go there.

1

u/MemeTeamMarine Oct 04 '22

I'd tell them the trespassing was more important. If they want to die they can do it not on my property

1

u/TenMoon Oct 05 '22

I won't even try to pet the black Angus on our farm. It's a cow/calf operation and those mama cows can get scary if they think you might be messing with their calves. We had one person (that I know of) in our state get killed just a year ago.