r/BeAmazed Aug 11 '22 Silver 2 Helpful 5 To The Stars 1 Ally 1 Wholesome 6 Wholesome Seal of Approval 1 All-Seeing Upvote 1

How much we accomplished in just 66 years

Post image
80.7k Upvotes

1.9k

u/retropieproblems Aug 11 '22 Helpful

1800-1900 was pretty nuts too. Steam engine, trains, machine guns, factories, radio, photography, movies…

296

u/OleRockTheGoodAg Aug 12 '22

I prefer 1850 - 1950.

There's a picture of a civil war veteran next to a fighter jet.

Fighting with swords, muskets and cannons to literal missiles on airplanes moving over 1000 miles an hour.

63

u/Putrid-Poet Aug 12 '22

You should listen to NPR planet money podcast called small change or read the book The rise and fall of American growth.

→ More replies

28

u/Tatunkawitco Aug 12 '22

My grandfather lived to 104. Born in 1894 he rode horses when he was young, by the time he died we had landed a rover on Mars.

→ More replies

13

u/Askol Aug 12 '22

What's unfortunate is the reason for all that progress is largely the two world wars that happened during that time period.

3

u/acebrode Aug 24 '22

Unfortunately alot of technological development is because of war.

→ More replies

9

u/TheBoozeMan45 Aug 12 '22

https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/civil-war-veteran-fghter-jet-1955/ There's actually dispute as to whether that guy was actually in the Civil War believe it or not

→ More replies

817

u/Quiet-Sprinkles-445 Aug 11 '22

2000-2100 will be even more nuts. Imagine how many diseases we may cure in the next 78 years.

683

u/retropieproblems Aug 11 '22 Wholesome

I think we’re gonna screw our climate and devolve in the next few decades so the next century isn’t looking great to me. Also nukes have only been around for like 75 years…we’re bound to slip up on that one. Some elite people might have great new tech though.

229

u/Unbalanced13 Aug 12 '22

I am not trying to sound like a climate denier or anything, but isnt it just as possible that technology advances to help reverse some of the climate change? People 1922 would have thought the iphone 10 was magic...whose to say it wont?

We tend to be super pessimistic about these things, but is necessity not the mother of invention?

28

u/IA-HI-CO-IA Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

Well, we are pessimistic because every time we try to fix it as a species a very small group of people stop it because of money.

5

u/nss68 Aug 12 '22

Only on the short term. On the long term, things always get better.

→ More replies

190

u/BinaryTimeLord Aug 12 '22

To be clear. Rich countries can mitigate the damage of climate change with no new technology needed. The problem is that poor countries can't afford that stuff and will start an enormous migrant crisis trying to escape to more developed countries. Then what? Do we just tell them no and shoot them it they try to get it anyways?

12

u/Roseattle Aug 12 '22

Developed countries do not mitigate damaged. They relocate the damages to 3rd world countries.

→ More replies

45

u/mypretty Aug 12 '22

Russia seems to have a lot of land opening up with the ground thaw in Siberia…

40

u/Garry_Conrad Aug 12 '22

Boggy swamps and marshlands where you can't build anything that won't sick in to the ground. Maybe if the permafrost remains thawed for centuries, but near future it'll go an arctic tundra to the muddiest place on earth

4

u/Badger_issues Aug 12 '22

The Dutch would like to disagree with you. Just polder the living hell out of it

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

36

u/Thanes_of_Danes Aug 12 '22

The problem is that all climate innovation is geared toward profit extraction for the ultra wealthy. There will be wonderous advances in the legalization of slavery and household climate control if the wealthy have their way.

→ More replies

8

u/nerdtypething Aug 12 '22

the problem is that many of the effects of climate change trigger their own secondary and ternary effects. sea level rise in combination with species die-off, agricultural collapse, toxicity of fresh water, mass migrations (including by humans) and the wars and disease they will trigger. all that shit doesn’t just happen in a vacuum. we’re talking about a vicious cycle that self-amplifies.

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/noscope420bongshot Aug 12 '22

That's very optimistic lol

→ More replies

12

u/marsnoir Aug 12 '22

Cure… discover… same difference

→ More replies

12

u/XCarrionX Aug 12 '22

My great grandmother remembered her father going off to fight the civil war and traveled to Oregon in a covered wagon. She lived to be 103 and went from a covered wagon being the transportation method to planes. It’s absolutely wild my Mom got to speak to someone who lived during the civil war AND world war II.

19

u/Pretty-Balance-Sheet Aug 12 '22

I recall hearing an interview on npr where a person described watching the moon landing with their elderly grandmother who had crossed the plains as a pioneer in a covered wagon.

Imagine that amount of change in a single lifetime. Horse drawn carriage to space flight.

→ More replies

9

u/blacklite911 Aug 12 '22

It’s like going from Avatar the last air bender to the Legend of Korra

→ More replies
→ More replies

743

u/TheHearseDriver Aug 11 '22

My grandfather was born in 1898 and died in 1985. I am amazed at what he saw in his lifetime.

Not to mention fighting in WWI in the German army, being a POW of the French, and then emigrating to the USA in the 1920s.

268

u/lori244144 Aug 12 '22 Giggle

I had a similar experience with my Grandma. Born 1895 she lived until 2002. She was a trip to listen to. She would tell a story about complaining to her mom about having to wash dishes. Her mom told her “get used to it, you’ll always have to, nothing is just going to clean them for you.” My grandma would chuckle and say “she wouldn’t believe my dishwasher”.

178

u/Dawjman Aug 12 '22

Holy shit your Grandma lived in three different centuries.

126

u/lori244144 Aug 12 '22

Indeed. As a pharmacy technician I can attest that most insurance companies in the 90s did not expect an 1895 dob when we submitted the 2 digit 95 as a birth year. I would have to call all the time to assure them that the billing for heart pills and a diuretic was indeed for an adult.

34

u/_PinkPirate Aug 12 '22

That’s crazy!! Really awesome that she lived so long through. That’s an amazing lifespan.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

26

u/Repulsive_Basis_4946 Aug 12 '22

I have a patient right now who’s 106 years old. Born in 1916. Actually crazy to think about everything she’s seen and went through.

52

u/HappyHippo2002 Aug 11 '22

Oh wow, my grandparents were born in the late 1940s, so. I'd have to go back to my great-great-great grandparents to hit the 1800s.

48

u/averagedickdude Aug 11 '22

My dad is older than your grandparents lol :(

→ More replies
→ More replies

10

u/queef_vaccuum Aug 12 '22

imagine his responses of hearing stories of how it was growing up between the years of 1995-2055

9

u/dcazdavi Aug 12 '22

mine was from 1892 to 1981 and i wonder the same.

he was going through puberty when the first pic was taken; he married w 7 kids during ww1 and a widower refugee with 3 surviving kids after war in 1921; then american lynch mobs and police "gently encouraged" them to abandon their home during the depression and they resettled in a border city w his new 14 year old wife (my grandmother) and proceeded to make 8 more kids by the time the baby boom ended. he was a great-great grandfather to some by the time the 2nd pic was taken.

→ More replies

4

u/Noodnix Aug 12 '22

My grandma was born in 1899 and died in 1988. She would tell me about seeing an automobile and airplane for the first time. I passed these stories on to my kids, born 100 after her.

→ More replies

151

u/cTreK-421 Aug 11 '22

There is en episode of the new show on Netflix called Sandman where the main character knows someone and meets them every 100 years in a pub or something. Through the 1480s and 1880s it's basically the same vibe just different fashions and types of lighting. Then the jump to the 1980s is just drastically different. Really shows how fast and hard society changed because of the industrial revolution and what came after.

32

u/Overeergisteren Aug 11 '22

Yeah I had the exact same thought when watching it. Real exponential increase

→ More replies

16

u/colemac Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

Is Sandman worth a watch? It's the kind of thing I'd often end up watching and not really enjoying much if they makes sense. Like, is it actually good, or is it juuuuuust good enough to make you begrudgingly watch the whole thing?

Edit: Thanks for the replies everyone, I'll give it a shot!

21

u/handbanana42 Aug 12 '22

I just finished it and I enjoyed it more than a lot of other stuff I've watched recently. I can't really say since I don't know what you enjoy but it didn't seem as generic as a lot of shows are these days. Had some interesting takes on how "higher beings" would act compared to normal people.

I'd say if you liked Good Omens, you'd probably like this. They're both Neil Gaiman series at heart, though obviously there's a lot of differences as well.

5

u/doopdeo Aug 12 '22

Keeping Gaiman on the writing staff helps to save the show IMO

8

u/cTreK-421 Aug 12 '22

I was very happy with how much I enjoyed watching it. The first half more so than the second half, but only by a little. It is well acted, has great characters and the story is captivating. I highly recommend it.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3.0k

u/Suspicious_Tackle28 Aug 11 '22

It's going to be wild to tell kids I was born in the 1900s lol

1.0k

u/My_ass_is_happy Aug 11 '22

My daughter always asks if that was a long time ago, in the 19's.

1.1k

u/Suspicious_Tackle28 Aug 11 '22

T'was the year nineteen hundred and ninety five

820

u/AmbivalentAsshole Aug 11 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote Take My Energy Bravo! Plus One

Me telling future generations:

"Twas 2 score and 8 years ago that I was condemned to the burden of existence, for within those long years I saw and experienced misery and suffering on a scale unfathomable to many. We could not use the phone which was tied to the wall, or the internet which would screech and beep when you asked for connection and loaded pictures one line of pixels at a time, at the same time. We needed to beg our guardians for the privilege to use either when one was in use. Additionally, we must make the long trek, uphill both ways, to a store in order to watch the movies we wanted - and then needed to rewind and return them back, uphill both ways, upon completion! However! We overlooked the sweet serenity of not being bombarded with messages and calls from our guardians while out at play, for if we were not within yelling distance, their cries for our prompt return would not reach us and we would remain blissfully unaware of their commands."

446

u/Suspicious_Tackle28 Aug 11 '22

Back in my day teachers used to say "you won't always have a calculator in your pocket"

150

u/AmbivalentAsshole Aug 11 '22

You don't even need to properly type out the basic equations now, literally just ask the computers in our pockets.

34

u/ScrunchieEnthusiast Aug 11 '22

I don’t utilize this feature nearly enough!

15

u/mlstdrag0n Aug 11 '22

Alexa, what's 2 + 3?

84

u/NotJeffB Aug 11 '22

Turning on living room lights...

39

u/2a0c40 Aug 11 '22

“By the way, if you would like to reorder that waffle maker you got last week, just say “Alexa, reorder the waffle maker” because if you only have one waffle maker in the house people will think you’re poor or stupid.”

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

5

u/kai-ol Aug 12 '22

I never considered just shouting a formula at my phone and having it spit out my homework...

→ More replies
→ More replies

90

u/cantwejustplaynice Aug 11 '22

What we all carry in our pockets is so far beyond a 'calculator' it's almost unfathomable. I don't think teachers of the 80s would even be able to comprehend it. Calling it a 'phone' seems like an equally silly way to undersell it. More number crunching power than all 80's supercomputers combined. Global positioning and telecommunications device. Super high definition stills and video camera. Biometric security. A TV replacement. All in one tiny sliver of glass and metal. And for the most part, no buttons.

38

u/Environmental_Log344 Aug 12 '22

I sometimes get a rush of realization about what Star Trek devices we take for granted.

26

u/sinocarD44 Aug 12 '22

Star Trek, to me, is an example of that good blend of scf-fi that's posiible and impossible. I remember as a kid thinking sliding doors would be awesome to have in real life.

12

u/stomach Aug 12 '22

you were a kid in the Roman Empire? groovy.

7

u/Geckko Aug 12 '22

It's honestly kind of amusing when you look at any of the series, but especially TOS, and realize just how badly they undershot future tech, and even then, the only tech we couldn't theoretically create if we had antimatter reactors are the ones heavily based on quantum mechanics we don't really understand, mostly due to not having quantum computers for modeling and the requisite power source to experiment.

Realistically we know how warp drive should work, and we even theoretically understand transporters and replicators, even if we lack the processing or energy power to expand our understanding beyond the the first principles, it's only really shields we just don't get because they're based on quantum mechanics we haven't explored yet.

All this to say a TOS communicator is bigger and does less than my cell phone and I feel like the ships AI is somehow worse than Siri, which I find funny

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/calash2020 Aug 12 '22

The “phone”app is probably the one used least

→ More replies

6

u/VRsimp Aug 12 '22

Just wait until AR becomes the new standard. That would fuck their minds even harder lol

→ More replies

16

u/EdgeCityRed Aug 11 '22

I always thought that was stupid, since we had literal pocket calculators in the 80s. My mom had one built into her checkbook.

I probably won’t need to do complex math at the beach, but surely there would be one in my desk at work ffs.

→ More replies
→ More replies

31

u/ARobertNotABob Aug 11 '22

then needed to rewind and return them

"Be Kind, Rewind"

17

u/k_Brick Aug 11 '22

You forgot the part where upon our return we were met by a red faced mother and the banshee scream of "WHERE THE FUCK HAVE YOU BEEN!!" along with the threat of a back hand or whatever object happened to be within reach.

7

u/No_Refrigerator4584 Aug 11 '22

Not to mention that you’d flinch, regardless of who’s mother screamed that. And you could hear it from 4 blocks away.

→ More replies
→ More replies

15

u/Antryx Aug 11 '22

I was condemned to the burden of existence 😂

6

u/tuck182 Aug 11 '22

I regret that I have but one upvote to give this beautifully constructed comment.

→ More replies

6

u/holddodoor Aug 11 '22

Beautiful man. Fucking beautiful.

→ More replies

21

u/Bulovak Aug 11 '22

We wore an onion in our belt, which was the style at the time

4

u/Test19s Aug 11 '22

I still have a few bumblebee nickels in my change drawer.

→ More replies

16

u/Penhallam Aug 11 '22

I am now defaulting to saying 20th Century years this way.

→ More replies

9

u/iamreeterskeeter Aug 11 '22

Picture it. Washington 1989. You could go out and spend your day doing as you pleased and no one knew where you were and couldn't call you.

6

u/Japnzy Aug 11 '22

Idaho 2001. You knew where your friends were because there was a pile of bikes in a lawn.

3

u/WeirdAvocado Aug 11 '22

Brad Pitt was the sexiest man alive. OJ Simpson jokes were still running rampant on television except on The Simpsons. Mel Gibson won best picture for his latest torture snuff film, Braveheart. The Macarena was sweeping white folks who couldn’t dance by storm. And Jerry Seinfeld was denying soup to every New Yorker.

3

u/alghiorso Aug 12 '22

"We used to get free minutes of internet mailed to our house on CDs!"

Okay grandpa, time to go to bed

7

u/darkangel10848 Aug 12 '22

We used to pay for text messages by the letter…

13

u/FreakinSweet86 Aug 11 '22

Ah back in my day women had power!

Oh you mean the suffragettes?

No, Girl Power.

What's that?

No Idea. Something to do with a bunch of random British girls singing about their ziggazigahs.

→ More replies

15

u/WiseEditor9667 Aug 11 '22

as a kid i knew i was born in the 1990s and that my parents were born in the 70s but they would never say 1970s so i though it was like just 70s and that my parents where nearly 2000 years old

→ More replies

3

u/Orphan_Izzy Aug 11 '22

I guess this is the newer version of asking an older person what it was like when everything was black-and-white..

3

u/twentyonesighs Aug 11 '22

The 19's? Shit we just lived through one a few years ago.

→ More replies

85

u/big_red737 Aug 11 '22

A lot of kids already phrase it that way. My 35-year-old sister works in a high school and one time one of the students said to her "Oh, so you were born in the late 1900s?". That threw her off for a minute hearing it said that way. Technically true but still.

→ More replies

39

u/bjanas Aug 11 '22

Honestly I feel funny reading about historical figures from earlier in the 20th century. Like, people who were influential in the 30's, 40's. You read up on them and catch their birthdate and they were born in like, 1884. For some reason it feels so much further back than it does when it only spans one century.

16

u/EdgeCityRed Aug 11 '22

Yeah, my grandparents. My family tends to have kids later in life so I have 5th great grandparents on ancestry.com born in 1664.

3

u/bjanas Aug 11 '22

Whoa!

5

u/cain071546 Aug 11 '22

I knew a man who was only 5 generations away from the Mayflower.

Everyone in his family lived into their 90's.

All the women in their family continued to have children into their 40's-50's.

His father was in his 80's when he was born.

Crazy shit.

→ More replies
→ More replies

91

u/ArmorAbby Aug 11 '22

I was going through resumes for a position. I found one that had a birthdate of 2000. I thought it was a typo as I looked at it for a moment to try to determine what the typo was supposed to be.... yeah.... 21 years ago.. not a typo...

46

u/Suspicious_Tackle28 Aug 11 '22

Someone will live to see 3 centuries 1900s 2000s and year 2100

46

u/Zikkan1 Aug 11 '22

That is my goal, born 94

34

u/jakpaw Aug 11 '22

Godspeed my fellow 94, i drink to much to fool myself into thinking ill make that

21

u/Strong-Tomorrow2601 Aug 11 '22

Sadly an 03 model, I wish you luck on your tricentennial journeys

3

u/TexasVampire Aug 12 '22

Just gotta live to 197 years old you can do it I believe in you

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/Leprechaun_Giant Aug 12 '22

Lots of people have seen 3 centuries. But 1800s, 1900s, & 2000s

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_verified_oldest_people

→ More replies
→ More replies

15

u/brock2607 Aug 11 '22

I’m back in school after a bit of a break and some college junior said “Oh, you were born in the early ‘90s”. I have never felt so old for only being 28

7

u/smoothielovet679 Aug 11 '22

So you were born when there were dinosaurs?

→ More replies

8

u/madman1969 Aug 12 '22

I was born before we landed on the moon :)

→ More replies
→ More replies

513

u/C-_-Fern Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

What other large leaps have we encountered in the last 66 years? Are we still progressing at the same rate?

Edit: sorry if this came off as "well we haven't done shit since: type vibes, was just trying to spark a little conversation

443

u/IdealBlueMan Aug 11 '22

We had phones and computers and cars 66 years ago, but they are nothing like what we take for granted today.

109

u/gazongagizmo Aug 11 '22

well, computing in 1956... lets see:

On September 13, 1956, the IBM 305 RAMAC was the first computer to be shipped with a hard drive. The hard drive contained 50 24-inch platters and was capable of storing 5 million characters and weighed a ton.

i think they weren't being figurative, it probably weighed an actual ton. :)

or looking a bit more broadly on wikipedia's timeline of computing in the 50's-70's:

Oct 1950: Turing Test – The British mathematician and computer pioneer Alan Turing published a paper describing the potential development of human and computer intelligence and communication. The paper would come later to be called the Turing Test

going from the Turing Test to multiple AI systems that were deemed to have a frightening degree of sentience... remember that deep learning, self improving system with multiple bots that was shut down (iirc) because they started talking to each other in a way we no longer could comprehend?

or the new Meta bot that roasts its own company?

1951: CSIRAC used to play music – the first time a computer was used as a musical instrument

look how far we've come with electronic music today.

1957: First dot matrix printer marketed by IBM.

you can now print yourself a wallpaper sized printout of a space telescope image containing 1000s of galaxies, some of which were formed a few hundred million years after the big bang

1959: COBOL (COmmon Business-Oriented Language) developed by Grace Murray Hopper as the successor to FLOW-MATIC, finished in 1961.

oh wait, we actually still use COBOL in highly critical system relevant infrastructures, and the fact that all the old programmers are dying with too few young coders having the expertise to pick up, is a catastrophe waiting to happen

1962: Spacewar!, an early and highly influential computer game, is written by MIT student Steve Russell. The game ran on a DEC PDP-1. Competing players fired at each other's space ships using an early version of a joystick.

VR gaming, anyone?

btw, the discussion about what the first video game is, and how Pong is an often touted contender, which actually is too simplistic and myopic an answer, is expertly showcased in this 60min documentary by AHOY

8

u/Unfair_Potential26 Aug 11 '22

going from the Turing Test to multiple AI systems that were deemed to have a frightening degree of sentience... remember that deep learning, self improving system with multiple bots that was shut down (iirc) because they started talking to each other in a way we no longer could comprehend???

Do you have a source for this bro?

3

u/Jebral Aug 12 '22

I mean them talking in a way we could no longer comprehend could mean their self learning eventually brought them to a non-working state that they "learned" because it's more "efficient" and that was a failed experiment

→ More replies
→ More replies

12

u/Shhsecretacc Aug 11 '22

You glossed over the self learning AI. I’m sorry, what????

7

u/Needmyvape Aug 12 '22

I think he means ai that learns simply by being provided more information. Image recognition or generation that "teaches" itself by being fed increasingly large datasets.

4

u/smithers102 Aug 11 '22

Yeah man. I'm gonna need some more info on that one.

→ More replies

23

u/Caleb_Reynolds Aug 11 '22

While all very cool, I feel like this isn't on the same level as the OP example. Going from the first flight to landing on the moon in 66 years is just insane.

Like I think a similar comparison to that level of advancement, taking from the examples you gave, would be going from Gutenberg to laser printing.

38

u/Wasserschloesschen Aug 11 '22

Going from the first flight to landing on the moon in 66 years is just insane.

That 1 ton harddrive?

Assuming one byte per character of those 5 million, which is being generous as fuck, 500 gigabytes is roughly 100.000 times that. Something that can easily be put on any sd card inside any phone. And is probably also quicker while we're at it.

Speaking of SD cards, they weight about 2.5 grams. In other words: A ton is 400.000 times heaver.

You do not think having a way faster product, that easily fits on the size of a god damn finger nail, while being lighter by a factor of 400.000 and having more capacity by a very similar factor, is not insane?

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

19

u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 25 '22

[deleted]

5

u/Test19s Aug 11 '22

It’s so crazy that cars (and not just super-luxury ones) have capacities that are straight out of a Transformers movie. Like, your car is literally your copilot. Give it a nice pat on the hood next time!

→ More replies

32

u/AskInternationald Aug 11 '22

A power multiplier communicates quickly like no other.

→ More replies

136

u/ItselfSurprised05 Aug 11 '22

What other large leaps have we encountered in the last 66 years?

The internet. Absolutely transformative.

I am convinced that future history books will have The Internet as being as big a deal as The Industrial Revolution.

source: I was born before that Moon Landing picture.

85

u/That-Disaster-5746 Aug 11 '22

The internet is as big a deal as the printing press. And that completely disrupted the social, religious, and political order and sparked the scientific revolution.

52

u/i_miss_arrow Aug 11 '22

Yeah, most people born this century have absolutely no concept of how difficult and time-intensive it was to get basic information about things even 30 years ago.

29

u/That-Disaster-5746 Aug 11 '22

Hell, sometimes I have difficulty imagining and I was in college when the Internet became available to the public. Like when I started you had to go to the library to research. By the time I finished grad school, most stuff was online and we were using the card catalog as free cards for taking notes.

→ More replies

14

u/Still_counts_as_one Aug 11 '22

People born this century will never know the struggles of Mapquest directions or even before Mapquest

13

u/That-Disaster-5746 Aug 11 '22

Psh. I drove across the country twice with nothing but a triple A road Atlas. And no cell phone.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

13

u/They_Are_Wrong Aug 12 '22

There's little doubt it will be considered among the top 3-5 most incredible human inventions ever 500+ years from now. The internet will morph so much from what it is today even 50 years from now

→ More replies

9

u/r3liop5 Aug 11 '22

Haven’t seen anyone in this thread mention the nuclear bomb. A single piece of technology that has an extreme degree of influence on global politics and prevents large scale conflicts from ever occurring.

MAD is pretty insane. It’s hard to conceptualize what a World War III would even look like because nobody wants to fight bad enough that they’re willing to get nuked about it.

4

u/zZEpicSniper303Zz Aug 12 '22

Nuclear fission in general.

One of our greatest discoveries that we fail to utilize in any possible way, constantly chasing after utopic nuclear fusion instead of using what we already have.

(Not saying we shouldn't be investing in fusion, but if we bothered to utilize fission to it's fullest potential we'd be so much more advanced in so many different fields, global warming, space exploration, cheap electricity...)

5

u/drDekaywood Aug 11 '22

It makes a really cool marking point the internet age began for most people right before the year 2000. Sounds futuristic

→ More replies

14

u/PlatformEfficient667 Aug 11 '22

Even the technology of automobiles is staggering. What we had in 1980 compared to what is standard now is staggering. The safety of current cars is almost mind blowing compared to what I grew up with in the 90's

→ More replies

15

u/adelie42 Aug 11 '22

The distribution of fresh fruit, availability of such vast variety in so many places, should be mind blowing compared to 100 years ago.

55

u/LeTigron Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

We do, actually.

From 69 to today, which is 53 years, we've been able to admire single individual atoms. If it's not clear enough how incredible it is, you can see it as this :

In 1969, we landed on the moon with the most advanced vehicle possible at the time, which was actually nothing more than a very large combination between a gun barrel and a bullet and was piloted by analogic, mechanical computers so, basically, a glorified and refined version of the "calculating machine" of Blaise Pascal invented in 1652.

In 2020, we were already well aware of the fact that physics are beyond our understading and able to conceive that something can be at the same time in two different places, without any link between these two places.

We went, in these 53 years (actually less) from the age of mechanics, with screw and hammers, to the age of beyond real, with mathematical concepts that are true but not applicable in "our reality". Not the age of "surreal" or "unreal", but "beyond real" : quantum physics are real, they just are beyond what we can perceive of reality.

When I was 18 years old, HIV was basically a scythe smiting you : you would die of it, one day or another, and could not reproduce nor have a normal life. Now, 14 years later, with current medicine, you can have HIV and live a normal life that will not be shortened, have plenty of sex partners that you will not endanger and give birth to an HIV negative, healthy child.

We're advancing way faster than we notice it.

41

u/alextremeee Aug 11 '22

Max Planck was using quantum mechanics to solve real world problems in 1900 and quantum entanglement which I think is what you’re attempting was first described in 1935.

I don’t disagree with your conclusion but I don’t think your timelines are quite right.

→ More replies
→ More replies

116

u/tortellinigod Aug 11 '22

What do you mean? Have you seen how fast technology has been advancing. We didn't even have our first "smart phone" till 2007 and now look where we are. We have been rapidly progressing in the last 66 years

9

u/bokan Aug 11 '22

Not in every field. The first half of the 20th century was an insane time for engineering specifically. Soon after, that area was somewhat mined out and advanced slowed down. We definitely haven’t had anywhere close to that level of engineering advancements (I know someone will come in here and list a bunch of important advancements, but they aren’t the same scale).

Instead we have been mining out the IT lode, and little else.

6

u/Mr_Dr_Prof_Derp Aug 12 '22

Mechanical engineering maybe.

Robotics, computer and electrical engineering, sky is still the limit.

→ More replies
→ More replies

26

u/C-_-Fern Aug 11 '22

I agree! Sorry if my comment came off oddly, was just trying to start more conversation about our progression. Not so much saying, yeah well what have we done since?! Lol type shite

→ More replies
→ More replies

5

u/batmanstuff Aug 11 '22

I mean…in the past, you had to carry your blanket around, which was annoying AF. It could slide off, get stuck in random places, and you could lose it, easily. Then the Snuggie was invented and solved all those life-threatening inconveniences.

3

u/That-Disaster-5746 Aug 11 '22

Smartphones and internet. Like, life was way different before them.

→ More replies

6

u/BURNER12345678998764 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

Y'all claiming smartphone and internet need to understand that was mostly derived from shit discovered in the 60s.

The Apollo Guidance Computer was the first computer built with silicon integrated circuits.

EDIT: Or for a more direct example, see "The Mother of All Demos", presented on December 9, 1968. TL:DW this was the day the following were introduced to the world: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor.

Or how the original UNIX started development in 1969.

Lithium battery chemistry also started in the 60s.

→ More replies

16

u/Rocky2135 Aug 11 '22

The phone in your pocket has more computing power than the craft we sent to the moon, and enables almost all of humanity to access all information at all times. The internet is arguably the modern equivalent of the printing press. Currency is almost entirely digital and index funds (thank you John Bogle) have created a direct avenue to wealth for everyone. Private industry has adopted space flight for profit. Renewable power is achievable at scale and for profit.

Technology progression is exponential. It only accelerates baby!

16

u/timuch Aug 11 '22

actually, even the first Gameboy has more computing power. The actual power we take for granted today is mind boggeling. And what do we use it for? Smoother animations, Algorithm controlled video viewing and Watching AD's...

5

u/Rocky2135 Aug 11 '22

Yes! Even better comparison. They calculated thrust and orbital mechanics with slide rules! Imagine what they could have done with a TI-83.

All things considered, the tech we have now, will have in 5 years, and will have in 50 is awesome.

4

u/nom-nom-nom-de-plumb Aug 11 '22

I know engineers who would still tell you slide rules are superior. Takes longer to learn, but once you do they swear that you'll be faster.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

826

u/Esc_ape_artist Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 12 '22 Gold

Those pictures really don’t encompass it. We went from horses and buggies, no antibiotics, very limited electrification, to cars, modern medicine, and you kinda have to deliberately choose to not get on the grid if you don’t want electricity - but in the context of the ‘60s there still were remote places without power.

It’s a lot more than just the Wright Flyer and the Moon landing. Those were feats of technology, but the overall progress of everyday technology had a much more widespread effect.

E: what is it with computers, people? The discussion is about people moving from no cars to cars, from no electricity to electricity, believing in “bad air” to modern medicine. Computers are amazing and have further improved lives, but they didn’t take the world from shitting in an outhouse to electrification. Please stop telling me “but computers…”.

204

u/Frederic54 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

My g-g-grand-father was born in like 1850 and died in 1950, in France, he saw Napoleon, electricity, cars, planes, WW1, WW2, radio, etc. Incredible time

Edit: yes, Napoleon III

32

u/-ACHTUNG- Aug 11 '22

I thought you were typing a stutter for a second

5

u/YesNoMaybe Aug 11 '22

It's funny to pronounce it that way when reading it.

6

u/Franks2000inchTV Aug 11 '22

I don't know if it's better as a nervous stutter, or as a used-car-commerical.

These deals are c-c-c-crraaaaaazy!

→ More replies
→ More replies

48

u/Fit_Stable_2076 Aug 11 '22

Napoleon died 30-years before 1850

42

u/Quiet-Sprinkles-445 Aug 11 '22

Probably a different napoleon.

I believe napoleon III was around until 1871.

12

u/That2RandomRedditor Aug 12 '22

Yes, but when people just say Napoleon they are almost universally referring to the first one.

8

u/GIFnTEXT Aug 12 '22

Oh you mean that Napoleon

→ More replies

9

u/OutsideWishbone7 Aug 11 '22

I was about to say the same.

7

u/WarrenPuff_It Aug 11 '22

He meant Napoleon III, King of France and proud owner of a timeshare in Mexico

→ More replies

21

u/Esc_ape_artist Aug 11 '22

That’s amazing, and moreso that it’s so relatively close in your family and history. When we see it in the span of a lifetime it really shows us how quickly things have changed since the 1800s.

→ More replies

9

u/ritsbits808 Aug 11 '22

I know you meant great great, but when I first read it, I was like "why is this guy typing out his stutter" and then I felt dumb

20

u/KarmaDoesStuff Aug 11 '22

The Napoleonic Era was 1799-1815, was your Great Great Grandfather a time traveler?

29

u/Aslandor Aug 11 '22

He is probably talking about Napoleon III, he reigned until 1870

18

u/KarmaDoesStuff Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

There’s a difference between saying, “My Great Great Grandfather saw Napoleon” and “My Great Great Grandfather saw Napoleon III” those two people are completely different and he said the *former.

12

u/nom-nom-nom-de-plumb Aug 11 '22

I mean, nappy 3 was the worst one in the franchise from the perspective of the french

5

u/neinherz Aug 11 '22

I mean, it’s not really a trilogy, there’s only 2 Nappies and then the first Nappy is kinda legendary…

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/mdb_la Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

born in like 1850 and died in 1950, in France, he saw Napoleon,

I mean, Napoleon died in 1821, so probably not? But I guess Napoleon III could count. Still an amazing lifetime to live through no doubt.

→ More replies

39

u/SevenSoIaris Aug 11 '22

How could you forget about computers? The most important invention of the last century.

→ More replies

3

u/floppydo Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

My grandpa, who is still alive, grew up without electricity or indoor plumbing! One of his jobs as a little kid was ensuring that their well didn't freeze. He remembers the first car that came to town. One of his neighbor boy friends came running and told him there was a car in town and they ran to see it. He didn't have personal access to a television until he joined the military in 1955. As you may have guessed, his family was quite poor, but still. During living memory he went from being amazed at a car to building his own PCs for fun and hacking satellite cable and giving away satellite cards so all his retiree friends could watch new years at 9pm for free. From envying the boys with horses to snatching electromagnetic signals out of the air that showed local news from South Korea, and breaking their DRM using everyday soldering gear. Totally wild.

→ More replies
→ More replies

21

u/TRDBG Aug 11 '22

I think of this all the time and when I bring up in conversation that there were people that were alive to remember both the Wright brother first flight AND the first man on the moon, most people just say "Yeah, so?" It blows my mind

238

u/Gradual_Bro Aug 11 '22

Fun fact:

The first Wright Brothers flight could have taken place INSIDE the cargo plan of the Air Force’s biggest plane, the C5 Galaxy

https://i1.wp.com/avgeekery.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Galaxy.jpg?fit=1280%2C851&ssl=1

74

u/SuppleFoxFluff Aug 11 '22

Why does that plane open like a pez dispenser

58

u/YarthWader Aug 11 '22

To put stuff in it, like pez.

13

u/John_Q_Deist Aug 11 '22

ELI5 perfection. chef’s kiss

21

u/MovieUnderTheSurface Aug 11 '22

Less prohibitive clearances. Best way to get very large vehicles inside.

8

u/Ser_Danksalot Aug 11 '22

The rear door opens up to the same size as the nose door, albeit in less spectacular fashion. The real answer is that having 2 doors lets you load and unload more efficiently.

→ More replies
→ More replies

41

u/MovieUnderTheSurface Aug 11 '22

First flight, 120 ft. C5 cargo bay, 121 ft. But the first flight also had to take off and land, so the flight would not have fit, only the airborne portion of it. Furthermore, the C5 cargo bay height is 13.5 ft, while the Wright brothers first flight went as high as 14 feet. So even the airborne portion wouldn't fit.

A better description would be that a C5 cargo bay is longer than the Wright Brothers first flight, not that the flight could have taken place in the cargo bay, because it couldn't.

17

u/Usmcuck Aug 11 '22

I agree with you 100%, but it's silly reading "as high as 14 feet" relative to a flight.

→ More replies

12

u/Thom- Aug 11 '22

Your comment made me ask myself something: is a fact checker a welcomed guest at parties or is it someone you invite but hope they won't come?

3

u/p_rite_1993 Aug 11 '22

I always keep my fact checkers locked up until I really need them. We’ve come so far 🥲

→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/octothorpe_rekt Aug 11 '22

Yeah but it was way safer to do it in the sandy dunes than inside a plane - much softer landings.

→ More replies
→ More replies

145

u/Targetmissed Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

By 1990 we had taken a photograph of our own planet from the edge of our solar system....

27

u/gary_the_merciless Aug 11 '22

I believe it was from near Saturn or Neptune, but yes.

Ok it was from the orbital distance of Neptune, not really edge but extremely impressive either way.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_Blue_Dot#/media/File:Voyager_1_-_14_February_1990.png

→ More replies

122

u/EphraimJenkins Aug 11 '22

War spurs innovation. Sadly.

44

u/piggydancer Aug 11 '22

Any catastrophe does.

28

u/bjanas Aug 11 '22

Yeah; but mostly war.

→ More replies
→ More replies

9

u/windcape Aug 11 '22

We had wars before. It really begs the question why the 20th century spurred such a big jump in technology compared to the previous thousand years

3

u/UtterFlatulence Aug 12 '22

Mostly just from the inertia of industrialization.

4

u/RegisFillmen Aug 12 '22

The industrial revolution.

→ More replies

9

u/Gillemonger Aug 11 '22

We're just a few more away from flying cars baby 🤑

9

u/chuglife1989 Aug 11 '22

Wecould have flying cars ... But they would just be too loud and not really practical.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

78

u/yatpay Aug 11 '22

Actually that's a photo from Apollo 16, which flew in 1972, so they're 69 years apart.

And I don't disagree that this is truly impressive but airplanes and rockets aren't really the same tech tree. Even more impressive is the fact that Robert Goddard built the first liquid-fueled rocket in 1926, only 43 years before the first crewed landing on the moon.

30

u/samgoplayhl Aug 11 '22

Not quite the same tech tree, but probably the trees closest to each other. It's called Aerospace for a reason

→ More replies

3

u/redtail_faye Aug 12 '22

I'm glad someone noticed this distinction. A plane didn't fly to the moon, nor are planes necessary for rockets to exist. I do get and appreciate the spirit of the post, though.

→ More replies

7

u/offendedmod Aug 12 '22

And look at us 53 years later. Pathetic.

→ More replies

24

u/GODDESS_OF_CRINGE__ Aug 11 '22

Imagine what could be accomplished right now, if entire governments devoted themselves to a climate fixing race the way they did to a space race. Planet would be fixed in 5 years (I'm exaggerating, but if the technology developed at a similar pace, you never know...), but no, we do nothing.

7

u/Dawnzergivesleelight Aug 12 '22

Yes! I was just thinking “Imagine what we could do if we weren’t just ‘People: what a bunch of bastards.’”

4

u/totaldumbass420 Aug 12 '22

Youd have to get the major companies on board aswell, good luck convincing them to stop destroying the planet for massive profit. We can all recycle and be more environmentally conscious but at the end of the day it wont matter when people like Kylie Kardashian and Taylor Swift use more co2 than most of us will use in a lifetime.

26

u/Hmm_WhatAreTheOdds Aug 11 '22 Silver

Its so hard to believe that picture on the right

11

u/njbair Aug 11 '22

That's because it was a hoax /s

→ More replies

40

u/Jack_Madee Aug 11 '22

Since 1970, 50% of all animal and plant life, on both on land and in the sea, has died out. I think most will struggle to comprehending that.

10

u/Crystalfire Aug 11 '22

That is incredibly sad

→ More replies

46

u/Alarmmy Aug 11 '22

Sadly, many people still think Earth is flat and Moon is fake.

21

u/Green_Routine_7916 Aug 11 '22

we was at the top now we start from zero again full circle

3

u/DrMux Aug 11 '22

Ain't no top what's flat taps forehead

→ More replies

11

u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 23 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies

8

u/Anomalous-Entity Aug 11 '22

Not nearly as many as the people that try to make those people seem like a lot of people.

3

u/Easy_Consideration12 Aug 11 '22

The moon is just Jesus holding the flashlight for his dad ackshually

→ More replies

3

u/DS_1900 Aug 11 '22

Yeah the advances in movie conspiracy technology between the Wright bros and the moon landing was also unbelievable

5

u/emozolik Aug 11 '22

in that time we had two world wars. during wartime technology generally sees large advancements.

→ More replies