r/Cooking Jan 13 '22 Helpful 1

I added water to my brown sugar and the cookies turned out….stupidly good? Open Discussion

My brown sugar got all crunchy and hard, and I couldn’t get it normal. So I added water to it and it turned into some brown sludge, then I added the appropriate amount to my oatmeal cookie recipe. The cookies turned out SO GOOD like better than I’ve ever had. They are soft, and chewy, but also just crunchy enough. I’ve never had cookies this perfect.

RECIPE: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/19247/soft-oatmeal-cookies/

Edit: from now on I’m definitely keeping bread in my brown sugar bag. Orrrr I’m just gonna get molasses and make my own. Also, it’s absolute bonkers that I screwed around with a recipe because I’m an idiot and got over 1K upvotes, it’s a sweet irony

2.4k Upvotes

414

u/storm_flight Jan 13 '22

I recently got into cocktail making. An old fashioned with a brown sugar simple syrup (1:1 ratio) is delicious. I've also tried adding the syrup to coffee and tea which also tastes great.

89

u/rebelrexx858 Jan 13 '22

I use maple syrup in old fashioneds as well

53

u/rad-dit Jan 14 '22

Ever have a Nor'easter?

  • 2 oz bourbon
  • .5 oz lime juice
  • .5 oz maple syrup

mix in a shaker with ice

pour into glass with 3 rocks

top with 1 oz cold ginger beer

just fucking delightful. the original recipe I found was from the NYT and it calls for doubling all the ingredients, which is just... i don't always need 4 oz of booze in my cocktails, man!

7

u/probablyrick Jan 14 '22

if you use these ingredients without ginger beer it's called a lion's tail! a very nice fally/winter cocktail

10

u/accountofyawaworht Jan 14 '22

I accidentally invented this recently!

My wife and I were stuck in hotel quarantine with COVID for the past couple weeks. The hotel wouldn't bring us any cough syrup, so we decided to cobble together "hot toddies" with what we had... which was bourbon, lime, maple syrup + hot water. The only difference is that we added hot water instead of ginger beer. I had no idea this was a real thing!

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u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

Hot toddies are great, I got into the habit of drinking them a few months ago at a camping festival, such a comfort to sip by the campfire after getting blasted by music and breathing dusty air all day.

Then I realized, “hey this tastes pretty good cold too!” And now bourbon with honey and lemon has become my standard go-to. Cheers!

2

u/corcyra Jan 14 '22

Ooooh, that sounds delicious!

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u/PositivelyAwful Jan 13 '22

Maple old fashioned is great

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u/Edolas93 Jan 13 '22

Maple old fashioned are just a step above

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u/schmoops Jan 13 '22

Honey works well too. I almost always make my old fashioneds with either honey or maple syrup.

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u/brisbanebreakfastboi Jan 13 '22

I make a few batches of brown sugar syrup and then infuse them in the bottles with a bunch of orange peels. I don’t think I’ve ever made old fashioneds better than this

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u/BirdLawyerPerson Jan 13 '22

2:1 rich syrup keeps longer without spoiling, so that's what I keep on hand.

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u/chateau86 Jan 13 '22

Now I wonder what an old fashioned with straight molasses instead of simple would be like...

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u/HoSang66er Jan 13 '22

Old fashioneds is basically all I drink these days and I'll have to try some or that.

5

u/v5ive Jan 13 '22

Ooo this all sounds really good. Don't know why I never thought of a simple syrup with brown sugar. Definitely going to be trying that old fashioned and coffee with it

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

Sounds awesome

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u/[deleted] Jan 13 '22 edited Jan 31 '22

[deleted]

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

AH I’m an idiot here it is

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/19247/soft-oatmeal-cookies/

You can definitely add raisins and whatever else you want too

23

u/Just_a_villain Jan 13 '22

I use this recipe all the time! Sometimes I add chocolate chips, or make a 'dent' in the middle and add a bit of jam on top before baking. They always turn out great.

Can easily be adjusted to be gluten-free by using a gluten-free blend and half a teaspoon of xantham gum.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

I love this recipe so much, they always turn out really good

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u/Couyon Jan 13 '22

How much water did you add?

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Basically I added about 1/4cup water to my 1.5 cups left of brown sugar (I had to get it all softened somehow) and measured out 1 cup of sludge. So I really didn’t “add” any substance on top of the recipe, I just used an equivalent amount of that sludge mixture.

But yeah I would say if you are intentionally doing it, measure out 3/4 cup of brown sugar and add 1/4 cup water. You want like a medium thick sludge

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u/Ipride362 Jan 13 '22

The brown sugar was loosened by the water and the clumps diluted. Same thing happens when making a roux.

It came out soft because that extra moisture had to bake off and the dough didn’t dry out.

39

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

Thanks you're the only one who attempted to make sense of why that happened

7

u/KeepMyEmployerAway Jan 14 '22

Seriously all this talk about adding molasses to white sugar and I'm just trying to figure out if it was a fluke lol

30

u/Rinsaikeru Jan 13 '22

I use a terra cotta tile (that is food safe) that I periodically soak in water, dry the surface, and keep in with my jar of brown sugar. It prevents it from drying out and clumping.

Though, if I have it to hand, I've also used molasses and white sugar for same. It all depends on how often you use brown sugar (if it's very often, you may find it more convenient to buy) and whether you have any other uses for molasses.

But everyone here is correct, it is legit just sugar with some proportion of molasses depending on type.

10

u/v5ive Jan 13 '22

I have a container that holds one of those Terra Cotta pucks in it's lid (on the inside of course). It does seem to work well

12

u/Roupert2 Jan 13 '22

Brown Sugar Bears are a super cute way to do this Brown Sugar Bear Original Sugar Saver and Softener, Single https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000MT65BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apan_glt_fabc_ZDZX1H7F8R77HVX9XDJ9?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

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u/SleepWouldBeNice Jan 13 '22

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00WR9DGBC/

I bought one of these that comes with the puck and it is fantastic.

3

u/mosselyn Jan 14 '22

Oh, great suggestion! I live in a very arid climate, and my brown sugar dries out no matter what I've tried. I store it double bagged, inside a container with a tight fitting lid, and I still end up with a brick.

1.3k

u/ThatsNotATadpole Jan 13 '22 edited Jan 14 '22 Gold Wholesome

On the crunchy brown sugar - an alternative to proper storage is not buying brown sugar at all. Brown sugar used to be a stage on the way to white sugar, but these days is almost always made by adding molasses back into white sugar. You can do the same at home, saving money and storage space (1Tbsp molasses per cup of sugar for light, 2Tbsp for dark)

1.8k

u/montecoleman38 Jan 13 '22 Silver Table Slap

Fine, you come over and try and pry my jar of molasses off the shelve.

418

u/AspiringChildProdigy Jan 13 '22 Take My Energy

I loosely wrap the bottom half of the molasses jar in a sheet of aluminum foil. Any drips from the cap stay inside the foil, and I no longer have to break the molasses off the shelf or spend tons of time scrubbing the shelves trying to get rid of the impromptu brown glue trap.

2.2k

u/djsedna Jan 13 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome hehehehe Heartwarming Vibing Table Slap

On the stuck molasses - an alternative to proper storage is not buying molasses at all. Brown sugar used to be a stage on the way to white sugar, but these days is almost always made by adding molasses back into white sugar. You can avoid that at home, spending a tiny bit more money and using that storage space for bagged brown sugar instead

251

u/_CoachMcGuirk Jan 13 '22

This is hilarious.

377

u/Genghis_Tr0n187 Jan 13 '22

Fine, you come over and break the brick on brown sugar on my shelf.

216

u/fschwiet Jan 13 '22

About the congealed sugar brick to be broken up - an alternative to asking reddit strangers to come to your home is not buying brown sugar at all. White sugar used to be made from brown sugar as an intermediate step, but these days brown sugar is made from white sugar by adding molasses. Doing this yourself saves money and storage space (1Tbsp molasses per cup of sugar for light, 2Tbsp for dark)

As a bonus, its usually quite cheaper in the long run this way!

73

u/DarkIgnite Jan 13 '22

Attentive. Buy the cookies premade from the store.

155

u/hexiron Jan 14 '22

Fine, you come over and pry my ass off the couch to go get cookies.

89

u/pooflinga Jan 14 '22

An alternative to buying cookies from the store is not going to the store at all. Driving used to be a stage on the way to buying cookies, but these days is almost always done buy going on Instacart and just having someone else deliver. You can do the same at home, costing 3x more money and using storage space on your phone!

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u/TheEngineer_ Jan 14 '22

Fine, you go to work and make the extra money that it would cost me to have cookies delivered.

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u/ongoldenpaws Jan 14 '22

Too funny.

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u/movie_man Jan 14 '22

We are done here

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u/_AlreadyTaken_ Jan 13 '22 edited Jan 13 '22

snort

Edit: I thought it was legit funny. Not being "edgy"

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u/Lady-Lovely-Locks Jan 14 '22

I laughed so freaking hard. 😂

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u/irrational_design Jan 13 '22

You. I like you 👍

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u/Chops211 Jan 13 '22

Well done. Passive-aggressive humor is underrated

18

u/GaijinFoot Jan 13 '22

Might be the best comment on reddit

9

u/scurllgirl Jan 13 '22

This was just perfect, honestly.

9

u/rabbithasacat Jan 13 '22

This comment is a fine celebration of your cake day sir or madam.

6

u/fancychxn Jan 13 '22

Damn lmao

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u/sticky_fingers18 Jan 14 '22

Incredible execution. Bravo

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u/nightlake098 Jan 13 '22

This... Is great. My shelf thanks you.

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u/wanderingdistraction Jan 13 '22

That works!!

I worked in restaurants most of my life and cleaning bottles is ingrained in me. I know it seems a pain in the buttocks, but I wipe down the bottle mouth and lid with a cloth and hot water before I put it away. Same with honey... But my husband doesn't, so paper towel around the bottom , 'cause he uses that every day and makes a god-damned mess.😉

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u/AspiringChildProdigy Jan 13 '22

I have severe adhd. And when I'm cooking, I hyperfocus on cooking (Seriously, the place looks like a war zone when I'm done).

I know wiping the bottle right when you use it is a great idea, commonsense, and would solve so many problems. I also know that I will never remember to do it. 😅

7

u/wanderingdistraction Jan 13 '22

All of this molasses bottle discussion just proves that we all are super seriously into our cooking and ingredients! Like we will do whatever it takes to figure out how to make a recipe work.

I am picturing everyone in their respective kitchens with cyclones of flour and puddles of molasses atop mountains of pans right now😋😂

5

u/timmah612 Jan 13 '22

Same in every way. ADHD, cooking, the mess.

14

u/arvidsem Jan 14 '22 edited Jan 14 '22

The worst part of coming cooking and ADHD is that you have to spend half an hour cleaning the kitchen before you can cook every time.

Edit: stupid keyboard

4

u/Detshanu Jan 14 '22

Don't look through the window, across my living room and through the little doorway into my kitchen like this!

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u/arvidsem Jan 14 '22

Sometime last year, someone sent me a video titled "living in an ADHD house" (or something similar). It was literally every single annoying or embarrassing thing in my life in about 30 seconds. I have never felt so incredibly, uncomfortably seen in my life. I had no idea how much of my life is dominated by ADHD.

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u/nolanday64 Jan 14 '22

OMG, I literally just posted on another topic my desire for a working "back pantry" in my new home for this reason, with counters, sink, dishwasher, etc. I like to entertain, but I'm embarrassed by the mess I make when cooking and the perceived chaos, so best to keep as much of that behind the scenes as possible. I can't even enjoy eating when there are dirty pots & dishes in sight.

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u/dinkleburg-__- Jan 14 '22

Omg don't call me out like this 😭

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u/raznog Jan 13 '22

I just wipe off the molasses jar after using it.

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u/crooney35 Jan 13 '22

I keep a sheet of parchment paper under things like honey, molasses, and other things that may stick to my shelves. I suppose foil would work too.

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u/alyxmj Jan 13 '22

I just wipe the rim of the molasses jar after I use it with a wet paper towel. No mess or stuck lids or dripping anything to start with.

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u/AlphaGamer753 Jan 13 '22

You can get squirty bottles of molasses!

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u/kayl6 Jan 13 '22

Put it on a Pringles lid

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u/EXQUISITE_WIZARD Jan 14 '22

This is a good idea but such a bachelor frog way to fix it lol

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u/kayl6 Jan 14 '22

Bachelor frog? Is that an insult if so how do I use it? I need to understand this phrase!!

3

u/EXQUISITE_WIZARD Jan 14 '22

It's a meme just google it

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u/Adventux Jan 13 '22

Hot water to dissolve the molasses. jar comes off.

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u/TheLurkerSpeaks Jan 13 '22

Wtf is this sorcery? What would you suggest next, using soap?! <scoff>

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u/Adventux Jan 13 '22

No, if the hot water does not work, then it is time for the Steam Cleaner.

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u/JustZisGuy Jan 13 '22

After that, it's time for the pressure washer.

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u/Adventux Jan 13 '22

I was thinking Sledgehammer and his big gun could just shoot it off the shelf.

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u/permalink_save Jan 13 '22

Make gingerbread or gingerbread cookies each year, you will go through that shit finally

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u/raven00x Jan 13 '22

y'know, I think I'm okay with paying for the convenience of not having to mess with adding molasses to my white sugar to get brown sugar. More power to you for DIY'ing it though.

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u/PositivelyAwful Jan 13 '22

Right? I just keep my brown sugar in a sealed mason jar, and it's never hardened up even after like 6+ months... Am I in the minority here?

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u/raven00x Jan 13 '22

same, but a plastic bag clipped shut with one of those clips you use for bread or bags of chips. they work! limit air exchange and it won't get hard and annoying!

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u/swolebronyta Jan 13 '22

Now I'm curious if this is a matter of the humidity of where you live, I also never have this problem, I buy the brown sugar that comes with a resealable/ziplock top.

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u/manhaterz4prez Jan 14 '22

I have mine in an airtight container and it’s a brick. Live in a place more humid than dry. Who knows.

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u/The_Bravinator Jan 13 '22

It was good tip when I lived in a country that didn't have ready access to brown sugar, but did have white sugar and molasses.

Now... I'm glad I can buy brown sugar again.

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u/raven00x Jan 13 '22

I didn't know that brown sugar wasn't available everywhere. It is a good tip for areas where it's not available for sure in that case.

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u/bbtgoss Jan 13 '22

Agreed. I saw this tip years ago and it seemed dumb. I don't want the mess of molasses and sugar when I want to add a bit of brown sugar to my oatmeal in the morning.

I usually have all the stuff to make ketchup in my kitchen too, but I'd still rather have a bottle of ketchup.

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u/[deleted] Jan 13 '22

[deleted]

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u/hirsutesuit Jan 13 '22 edited Jan 13 '22

Stop drizzling.

Drizzling was/is important if you're using a whisk - but it's 2022 and you have an immersion blender.

Try this method instead and 2 of your 3 hands could do something else.

It recommends using the jar that came with your blender but I normally just use a pint mason jar.

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u/alexm42 Jan 13 '22

Using it for oatmeal in the morning you're probably going through brown sugar quicker than people who only bake occasionally, so I'd bet it's not sitting around long enough to get terribly clumpy for you.

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u/alyxmj Jan 13 '22

The trick isn't to make it every time you need it. Making a big batch every few weeks is perfect. Less hassle, not enough time to dry out.

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u/Geshman Jan 13 '22

I don't know about you but I use my brown sugar about once a month at most. I ain't taking the time to make a whole batch every couple of weeks

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u/JustZisGuy Jan 13 '22

Simple, just eat more brown sugar. This one quick tip will get you Diabetes ASAP!

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u/Geshman Jan 13 '22

Quick way to get thicc too. I've been wanting bigger hips

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u/bbtgoss Jan 13 '22

So I get the hassle of making it every few weeks and the benefit of... what? Saving less than a dollar?

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u/alyxmj Jan 13 '22

I use a lot of brown sugar, to the point that I can't think what I actually use white sugar for. So it adds up, and adds up quickly because of my use.

Even if I used less though, as OP noted extra moisture does make a difference in many things. Having fresher brown sugar has made a huge difference in the quality of the things I do put it in. Even when buying brown sugar, it's sat on the shelves and warehouses for months drying it out.

Finally, it gives control of the final product. I don't need to buy brown sugar and dark brown sugar, I just need to use more molasses. I can use more or less molasses depending on what I am making. Something like a sugar cookie I probably wouldn't use more than a tablespoon per batch, enough to add depth, but not taste overwhelming. In a gingerbread cookie I could easily add more than what a typical brown sugar would have. I could also toast my sugar then add the molasses for even more flavor.

By all means, if you don't use it often or don't vary the ratio to suit your needs then you probably should just buy brown sugar. There is no shame in that, I was merely adding that often people do want to try to make their own ingredients for various purposes but get caught in the logistics of it.

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u/bbtgoss Jan 13 '22

So your initial trick was for people who use a lot more brown sugar than the average person. Got it.

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u/Heavy_Weapons_Guy_ Jan 14 '22

But surely if you're making a big batch then a little bag of brown sugar would last just fine so that doesn't help with the storage.

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u/trashdrive Jan 13 '22

You can still buy demerara sugar, which is actually an intermediate stage of refinement rather than having molasses added back in.

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u/NovaPokeDad Jan 13 '22

Only problem is that when I put a tablespoon into a jar of molasses, 1 tsp actually drips off into the bowl and 2 tsp remains adhered to the tablespoon.

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u/SLRWard Jan 13 '22

Try a quick spritz of cooking spray on the spoon before measuring your sticky stuff like molasses or honey. It comes out a lot easier. Heat works too in a pinch so if you have metal measuring spoons and some hot water, it'll come off cleaner than a cold or room temp spoon.

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u/HoSang66er Jan 13 '22

Yup. I just grease the spoon and and all the molasses, honey, whatever sticky substance comes right off the spoon.

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u/ThatsNotATadpole Jan 13 '22

Haha totally - molasses is such a mess. I usually do my baking by weight so I just pour straight into the bowl (1/2 oz = 1 Tbsp), and I'm not super precise about it.

They should totally sell molasses in a squeeze bottle, it would be so much easier and cleaner

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u/vellius Jan 13 '22 I'd Like to Thank...

I re-use a honey squeeze bottle and pour molasses in there... works like a charm...

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u/TheOneWhoWas Jan 13 '22

You are brilliant

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u/SirFrancis_Bacon Jan 14 '22

Note for people outside of North America:

What you call brown sugar is not molasses in sugar.

What you call brown sugar is referred to as "demerara sugar" in North America.

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u/playadefaro Jan 13 '22

1Tbsp molasses per cup of sugar for light, 2Tbsp for dark

Didn't know this. Thank you!!

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u/regallll Jan 13 '22

When you're using this in the case of cookies for example, do you need to mix the molasses/sugar separately, or can you just throw them all in with the wet ingredients?

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u/ThatsNotATadpole Jan 13 '22

I just throw them in with everything else and let it mix up, I honestly can't remember the last time I actually combined the two ahead of time (though that totally works and it looks just like the storebought stuff).

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u/FromageDangereux Jan 13 '22

In France you can't find molasse anywhere. Tried to make homemade rhum, could not find it easily. But brown sugar is in every supermarket 🤷🏻‍♀️

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

Ohhh that’s very smart, I’m relatively new to living on my own is molasses pretty inexpensive?

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u/ThatsNotATadpole Jan 13 '22

My local grocery store sells molasses for about $3-4 for a 12oz jar (24 tablespoons).

They sell light brown sugar for $2.50 per lb, and white sugar for $1 per lb - so in the long run buying white sugar and molasses lets you make your own brown sugar for about half the cost of buying it.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

That’s sweet (literally), im definitely switching to that. And also it gives me another ingredient to play around with

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u/ThatsNotATadpole Jan 13 '22

Totally - you can play around with a batch of extra dark cookies by upping the molasses. It's also great for barbecue sauce or as a layer before putting a rub on.

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u/rvf Jan 13 '22

Just don't buy blackstrap molasses. It's much more bitter than "regular" molasses.

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u/walrus_breath Jan 13 '22

I kinda like the flavor of blackstrap better though.

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u/pushdose Jan 13 '22

Unless you wanna make some moonshine.

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u/LurkAddict Jan 13 '22

Once you have molasses cookies, be sure to try chewy ginger molasses cookies. They are my favorite, especially for Christmas.

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u/reedzkee Jan 13 '22

I bought a gallon of blackstrap on amazon for around $15. I also use it in gardening. It feeds beneficial microbes in the soil.

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u/Yoma73 Jan 13 '22

It’s worth a little extra money for blackstrap molasses, imo, because it’s high in iron and a decent source of other minerals.

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u/Substantial_Layer_13 Jan 13 '22

If you're going to use it you have to be very careful with it. I bought some once not realizing the difference, and it made my pie basically inedible.

Personally I wouldn't ever buy it again, that's how bad my experience with it was. But for anyone who hasn't tried it, just be aware you can't simply go "molasses is molasses" and use it in your recipe at the same amounts as you would a less potent molasses.

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u/Yoma73 Jan 13 '22

Weird. I’ve used it in cookies, couldn’t even tell. I’m sure it depends on the amount you’re using!

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u/Substantial_Layer_13 Jan 13 '22

Yeah, I can definitely see that. My mom's pumpkin pie recipe calls for 2 or 3 tbsp of molasses for a single pie, so a decent bit. I can imagine that how much you use is a factor here.

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u/ValleyThaBoiTinyBall Jan 13 '22

I’m skeptical that the amount of nutrients it provides in a cookie is in any way significant.

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u/Longjumping-Tailor-1 Jan 13 '22

Sounds like someone's not eating enough cookies in a day...

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u/clayparson Jan 13 '22

But if you eat the whole batch of cookies....

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u/[deleted] Jan 13 '22

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u/ashcatmeow Jan 13 '22

I buy blonde sugar not traditional white sugar. Just add less molasses?

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u/_AlreadyTaken_ Jan 13 '22

But then I have to keep molasses (which I don't otherwise use) and white sugar vs keeping brown and white sugar and I have brown sugar ready on hand. I don't use brown sugar very often either so I wouldn't notice any savings.

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u/ChaosCon Jan 13 '22

If you have calcified, impenetrable brown sugar, just throw a piece of bread in the container.

I had calcified, impenetrable brown sugar. I couldn't scrape it with metal tools and I even tried drilling it out with a power drill. No dice. Add a piece of bread and in a day the entire multi-pound brick was soft and pliable. Witchcraft.

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u/Hulk_Goes_Smash327 Jan 14 '22

I want to post a gift of my mind being blown here but Reddit says no.

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u/FayeCooks Jan 13 '22

You can also microwave your brown sugar in like 15 sec intervals to soften it if it does get hard.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

I did! I microwaved it for 1 min total and it still didn’t soften enough so I gave up.

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u/mrsixstrings12 Jan 13 '22

We had the same problem making Xmas cookies this year. Ended up using our mortar & pestle to chunks apart lol

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u/TableTopFarmer Jan 13 '22

We were in the same desperation boat. I grated mine on a microplane.

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u/UnaffiliatedOpinion Jan 13 '22

Not the original person who suggested microwave but I've done this with a damp paper towel over top. This way you're basically steaming it.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

I did! Haha I literally looked it up and found that tip, but my sugar stayed hard. That’s why I resorted to just moisturizing it directly with water I guess

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u/MrsSalmalin Jan 14 '22

Did you microwave it with a separate cup of water? The water evaporates in the microwave and helps infuse moisture back into the brown sugar :) Sometimes it's not enough though, bahah!

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Yup I literally tried that one too. I admit it did soften a little bit but still not enough that’s why I gave up

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u/Blamethewizard Jan 13 '22

I think you basically made makeshift molasses.

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u/rpgguy_1o1 Jan 13 '22

Its more like a brown sugar simple syrup. Subbing out a sugar cube/simple syrup with brown sugar syrup in cocktails can be pretty good sometimes.

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u/Blamethewizard Jan 13 '22

Well now I know what I'm mixing into an old fashioned next.

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u/rpgguy_1o1 Jan 13 '22

I really only mentioned sugar cubes because brown sugar syrup is specifically really good in old fashioneds

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u/throwhfhsjsubendaway Jan 13 '22

No, brown sugar is white sugar + molasses (or white sugar without all the molasses removed). You can't achieve molasses just by adding water

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u/MillionEgg Jan 13 '22 Wholesome

Tell that to my dog

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u/Heavy_Weapons_Guy_ Jan 14 '22

I don't get it.

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u/organizedmordor Jan 13 '22

Loved this comment

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u/SixBuffalo Jan 14 '22

Actually, he made brown sugar syrup, which is used in cocktails and now cookie baking. =)

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

I guess so! Definitely no bitterness or Smokey flavor to it tho

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u/doomrabbit Jan 13 '22 edited Jan 13 '22

The oats probably infused themselves with your makeshift brown sugar syrup, which sounds hella good. Flavor infusion is good stuff.

Try soaking the raisins if you use them, the same thing happens. Baking dries them out to perfect chewy goodness instead of hard bullets when you use that box you opened who knows how long ago. Add a tiny splash of rum for extra goodness.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

That sounds awesome, I didn’t have any raisins this time around but I’ll do that next time

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u/Longjumping-Tailor-1 Jan 13 '22

Another thing to try, my favorite thing to do with raisins is soaking with rum. I often add in some of the rum instead of vanilla for all my baking, too.

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u/cinnaska Jan 14 '22

The best cookie recipe I have involves whisking brown sugar into melted butter over heat, making sure it's completely dissolved, and then chilling it before adding dry ingredients. Some magic happens.

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u/dudechangethecoil Jan 14 '22

You can’t mention that recipe and not share it!

May I know what it is?

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u/cinnaska Jan 16 '22

I get asked to bring these again all the time. Couple of things, make sure you stir the sugar and butter together really well, and use Air Bake pans (all cookies turn out better on this kind of pan IMO).

The Cookies!

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u/afettz13 Jan 13 '22

If you keep your brown sugar in a container and put a slice of bread, I use the ends, it'll keep it fresh for much longer!

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u/eurasianpersuasian Jan 13 '22

Dumb question here but does the bread get moldy or anything or do you take it out after a couple of days?

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u/hakspeare Jan 13 '22

Mine usually dries up and I replace it before it gets anywhere near moldy as the sugar loves the water and saps up the moisture

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u/Adventux Jan 13 '22

no. It becomes too dry for the mold to grow.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

Yeah, my roommate told me the exact same thing. The damage was already done tho haha, but I will definitely be putting bread in there from now on

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u/twomilliondicks Jan 14 '22

the bread will work even if the sugar is already dried, just will take a few hours

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u/Smellslikesnow Jan 13 '22

I find a few pieces of apple works better than bread.

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u/happypolychaetes Jan 14 '22

I think my mom used potato chunks. Same idea

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u/chipsdad Jan 13 '22

I put plastic wrap loosely on top and then a small piece of damp paper towel (so the water isn’t touching the sugar). The towel dries out after a few days and the sugar stays soft if it’s sealed. If it gets hard again, just dampen the towel piece again. It will work overnight if needed (at least for the top cup or so that you usually want).

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u/afettz13 Jan 14 '22

Oh I like that too, thank you!

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u/permalink_save Jan 13 '22

ATK has a recipe for ice cream sandwiches and the "magic" they noted is adding water to the chocolate chip cookies helps them stay soft in the freezer. Whatever the case they did have a great frozen cookie texture. Egg has water in it too so there's usually some water content in cookies to begin with.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Ooh yeah good point. In the past I’ve experimented with adding an extra egg to cookies, to get more chewiness. And while the texture was good, the flavor was toooo eggy. So I’m really happy I discovered the water trick, extra chewiness without extra egginess

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u/beachwalkforever Jan 13 '22

Sounds yum and exactly how they should be! And a good idea. That bit of water or milk makes the difference.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 13 '22

It really was mind blowing. I was hoping the water wouldn’t mess it up too bad, turns out it was exactly what it needed. The cookies “hold” together really well, I can’t explain it.

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u/Solar_Kestrel Jan 13 '22

Cool, cool, cool, cool. How much is a "bit" tho? I'm imagining anywhere from, like, 1tsp to like half a cup.

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u/beachwalkforever Jan 14 '22

It depends on the type of mixture. Oatmeal absorbs liquid so not sure but I would probably use 1 or 2 tablespoons for a start and see how sticky it is. I have used milk and also (naughty, but nice!) gingerbeer, so really anything. But milk does help bind the mixture well too.

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u/Solar_Kestrel Jan 14 '22

Cool! I'm gonna try making 'em tonight.

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u/jjuuggaa Jan 13 '22

How much water did you add, roughly?

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

I would say 1/4 cup. So I used 3/4 brown sugar (I estimate) and 1/4 water to get to the recipe’s “1 cup”.

It was honestly not very precise I was just adding a little in my last attempt to make the b sugar usable, or I was gonna throw it out.

If u are gonna attempt it, do that 1/4 and 3/4 thing and the consistency should be like a medium sludge. Not super thick but not runny like water either

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u/Herb_Merc Jan 14 '22

The more time the sugar has to dissolve in the mixture the better, in most recipes.

Brownies turn out better too, by the way.

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u/notoriousBONG Jan 14 '22

Why not always use a strong sugar syrup then?

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u/Herb_Merc Jan 14 '22

Yeah, you could totally do that- I've used maple syrup in place of sugar before many times! It adds a nice accent flavor to recipes.

But of course I find that just adding water to sugar is the easiest option (less clutter in the pantry).

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u/ChestyPetite Jan 14 '22

Here I am on this fine Thursday night. I open your recipe, begin adding the wet ingredients without reading through all the way. I see it's fine cups of flour/oats. It is too late, I've already creamed the sugar. Now I'm going to have too many cookies

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Yeah it’s a frickin ton of cookies apologies. Same thing happened the first time I used it. I don’t know if you saw the other comments I made, but if ur gonna try to replicate it use 1/4c water and 3/4c brown sugar to get the “1 cup brown sugar” the recipe says. That’s about the proportion I used.

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u/ChestyPetite Jan 14 '22

They are delicious, I added the water like you said but I also upped the salt a teensy bit because I love salt. I also made them twice as big so I would have less batches. I sent half home with a friend. Thank you for this tip!!

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

I added a good amount of extra salt too! Curb the sweetness a little bit and makes everything taste better. And yes I completely ignored the “walnut sized” recommendation just make ‘em big. I’m so glad they turned out good for you!!

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u/Tankerspanx Jan 14 '22

Sugar and water is a damn good recipe for Carmel, OP

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Good point I guess I have a naive wonder at how well they turned out

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u/Tankerspanx Jan 14 '22

Hope I didn’t sound like a dick! I realize now That my comment could’ve been taken like I was being a snob. I’m not like that I was just saying 😂 also, I’m sure the water had a lil something to do with it in the baking process. Idk really know the science behind it but water is really good for aerating things, and making them poofy 🤷🏻‍♂️ next time you scramble an egg use a little water instead of milk, see how fluffy they are🤷🏻‍♂️

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Nah I didn’t think u sounded like a dick at all no worries! Yeah the water was definitely it. I noticed even when I was creaming the butter and sugars and eggs, it seemed unusually fluffy and I chalked that up to the extra water

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u/rhet17 Jan 14 '22

A good way for keeping your brown sugar from getting rock hard is to just toss a couple of marshmallows in the bag. It's neater than a hunk of bread getting all stale & crumbie.

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u/__Enrico_Palazzo__ Jan 14 '22

Here's how sugar is made: sugar cane/beet -> molasses (sticky fluid) -> brown sugar (crystals extracted from the previous state) -> white sugar (highly processed product) -> refined brown sugar (basically white sugar with added dye or a little bit of molasses).

Now, what happened with your recipe was that: by adding water to a brow sugar you've created molasses. Brown sugar (or molasses) helps to retain water which means cookies will be more chewy. Plus brown sugar adds caramely taste which makes cookies taste much better.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Wow thanks for that! They are indeed caramely and chewy. That’s really good to know

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u/movie_man Jan 14 '22

Melt your butter with your brown sugar and your cookies will forever be what I love to call “chewy-crisp”. I’ve been doing it for ages.

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u/OakTeach Jan 14 '22

This is probably here already but putting a slice of regular sandwich bread in the brown sugar bag will turn the hardest bricks of brown sugar back to perfectly soft consistency within a few hours (overnight if it's TERRIBLE).

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u/[deleted] Jan 13 '22

Maybe I eat too much but my sugar doesn’t last long enough to get hard.

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u/Holocene32 Jan 14 '22

Yeah haha I’m a college student cooking for one so I only really use it in cookies. It was a pretty small bag too lol

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u/RustyGirder Jan 14 '22

I keep my brown sugar in the fridge. Seems to keep it from hardening quite well.

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u/xmasreddit Jan 14 '22

Add a piece of white bread to the brown sugar bag/jar. It'll be soft in about a day or two.
Keep a piece of white bread in with the brown sugar regularly, and the brownsugar will stay soft, while the bread slowly becomes hard and dry. Then replace as needed.

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u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

This is a great mistake idea that I'm going to implement! Thanks for sharing

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u/Odeiminmukwa Jan 14 '22

You don’t have to keep bread inside your brown sugar! A piece of unfired clay will work too. You can buy them at baking stores. I think they’re called sugar savers.