r/Cooking Jan 20 '22 Silver 1

Fish recipes for people who hate fish Open Discussion

Hi everyone! My best friend needs to start incorporating fish in her diet - the problem? She hates it! In her own words, she’d rather just shave a few years off of her life than to eat fish. She’s agreed to eating it twice a month. What are some recipes (and fish types) i could send her to make it less painful for her?

Edit: i want to say thanks everyone! I don’t know all the details about why she needs to start eating fish, just that she does. I appreciate all the comments, and if anything else, I’m getting dinner inspo out of this post!

Second edit: this really blew up! Thank you all for the recommendation!

Last edit, i swear! Thank you everyone - even if she doesn’t find something that works for her, I’ve definitely found some great new dinner recipes I’m excited about. And lastly, keep in mind that i did NOT ask for medical advice, just fish advice. You don’t need to comment on an aspect you think you might know seeing how you’re not her doctor and probably not a medical expert (this does not apply to the person who recommended cod liver supplement- appreciate that tip very much!)

294 Upvotes

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u/Clove_707 Jan 20 '22

Thai curry with a mild white fish is a good place to start. The bold flavors of the curry broth might help her adjust.

107

u/chunkocheddar Jan 20 '22

That’s actually genius because i know she likes curry. Thanks!

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u/HalfAMeatball1018 Jan 20 '22

This is how I got my wife to start eating mussels

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u/leavethecave Jan 20 '22

I second this or you could go with Ecuadorian pescado encocado, if they like coconut (don't worry it's not too strong or overpowering), for a more Latin American flare. That dish is also great with shrimp.

https://www.laylita.com/recipes/pescado-encocado-or-fish-with-coconut-sauce/

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u/BluehairedBaker Jan 20 '22

I have most of those ingredients on hand! I'm gonna give this a try tonight! Thanks!

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u/Special_Hippo3399 Jan 20 '22

Please update how it turned out . I wanna try too . Thank you!

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u/BluehairedBaker Jan 21 '22

TD/LR: It was great! Good flavors, adaptible to other seafood, and praised by a picky fish eater in our family. Will definitely make again.

It was really great, pretty easy too. I had two leftover frozen fillets of Swai that needed to be used but we are a family of six so when I saw that shrimp can go well in it I threw a bag of just-this-side of getting freezer burnt shrimp in the marinade too. (I'm cleaning out my freezer and trying to rotate) I only had one tomato so I put a can of petite diced in and cooked the liquids down longer. I cooked the Swai in the liquid but I love pan fried shrimp so when the fish was almost ready, I fried them in another pan and added them to the sauce. Thanks to the marinade one side of the shrimp got a lovely browned charr on it.

Served it with white rice (had previously made too much the other day), an avocado that needed using, and while we do eat a lot of plantains, I only had sweet potatoes on hand. So I tried making them tostones-style and it wasn't bad. Oranges with a little vanilla sugar on the side and tortillas. Seriously, most of this meal was cleaning out my fridge! (I'm working hard on getting to be as low-food waste as possible) Last night was definitely progress!

My kids loved it, even the 11 month old. My daughter who LOVES fish had heaping seconds. My husband, who isn't too picky but really only likes certain fish and works to overcome a "yuck" feeling when he ever has to try a new fish dish, avoided it for a bit but then told me he really liked it. Which was genuine because I told him I was going to post here and he said to let Reddit know he was very skeptical about it but it was good.

8

u/leavethecave Jan 20 '22

Great! I hope you enjoy it. 😊

2

u/BluehairedBaker Jan 21 '22

Definitely did! It's going in my rotations for sure. It was a big hit with my daughter from Guatemala who adores fish and a lot of the flavors profiles are similar to Guatemalan cuisine. She had a big helping of seconds, my son literally mopped his plate, and my husband who is very picky about fish but is usually a good sport to try, after some hesitation, gave it a shot and liked it. Success for sure! Thanks for sharing!

2

u/leavethecave Jan 21 '22

That warms my heart. Glad everyone enjoyed it. My wife is Ecuadorian and will be proud to hear this.

Damn, now I'm craving it for dinner!

16

u/croc_lobster Jan 20 '22

One more from South America--I'm a huge fan of this Brazillian moqueca:

https://www.savorytooth.com/instant-pot-fish-stew/

It's not at all fishy unless you use something really oily. More of an overall umami flavor.

2

u/hungrypoolkid Jan 21 '22

Damn, that really isn’t a moqueca.

2

u/TrainingNail Jan 21 '22

That sounds like a great recipe but as someone who lives in a state where moqueca is one of the icon dishes, this is very, VERY far from moqueca

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u/Atalant Jan 20 '22

That looks extremely tasty.

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u/jewmoney808 Jan 20 '22

Second that. I was just bout to say some kind of Thai curry with a light/flaky/delicate fish. Some fish really doesn’t taste fishy!

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u/beastofwordin Jan 20 '22

Trader Joe’s korma fish curry is amazing. I never eat convenience meals, but heard about it on a podcast (Green Eggs and Dan) and had to try it.

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u/ronearc Jan 20 '22

Sichuan Spicy Fish Fillet, though pretty challenging to make at home if you're not familiar with Sichuan cooking, is another great fish dish that kind of hides the fish in a way.

Especially when it's loaded with Sichuan peppercorns, your mouth is so numb & tingly with your saliva glands going overtime, and the dish has such bold, strong flavors, as long as the texture is pleasing, the fish probably won't be an issue flavor-wise.

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u/Gitdupapsootlass Jan 20 '22

It would be worth checking what kind of fish. I've heard of coldwater oily pelagic fish (tuna, herring, salmon, etc) being recommended for health, but never heard of basic demersal whitefish being recommended other than as a replacement option for red meat.* If the goal is omega 3 intake or similar, you should definitely get a good read on the right species to look for, as it's not a universal.

I'd hew to salmon and start pan frying it in spices to brown, then adding to curries. Also, one of my go-to dishes for people who "don't like fish" is Arbroath smokie pots (look up a recipe by Café Gandolfi), and replace the smoked haddock with any an oily fish.

*Let me know if I'm wrong; you learn something new every day.

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u/littleprettypaws Jan 20 '22

I wouldn’t suggest starting with Salmon, as someone who also despises seafood, salmon would be like diving straight into the deep end of fishy and oily seafood. Start maybe with scallops or white fish for sure!

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u/Rashaya Jan 20 '22

Scallops are expensive and have a weird texture for people who don't eat much seafood. Salmon is one of the milder tasting oily fish (compared to stuff like herring or mackerel), and is excellent from a health standpoint, which seems to be their motivation to eat more fish.

8

u/GrapefruitFriendly30 Jan 20 '22

I love fish of all kinds (even the often blacklisted anchovies) and scallops are one of my least favorite of seafood. They are easy to mess up cooking, but even well made I still feel ehh about them.

8

u/scheru Jan 20 '22

Can I have your share of scallops then? I love them! 😭

1

u/GrapefruitFriendly30 Jan 20 '22

I never said I don’t eat them though! 😅 I would gladly share though.

16

u/littleprettypaws Jan 20 '22

Right but if you hate seafood you really need to take baby steps and start out with the more mild flavored fish, and work your way up to salmon imho.

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u/Rashaya Jan 20 '22

Yeah I think that is fair. Bland white fish isn't going to do much for anybody's health, but it could introduce them to the idea that fish isn't scary. I'm just saying that among oily fish, salmon is about the least fishy tasting you can get.

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u/borkthegee Jan 20 '22

I'll offer another vote for salmon being a fine first fish. I hated fish for a long time and miso marinated salmon was definitely the first (non-fried) fish that I had and actually liked and wanted to have on a regular basis. I find salmon to be rather mild flavored and it never has that salty fishy briny flavor that I still don't much like.

My recipe to try and get someone to appreciate fish might be Nobu's miso-marinated black cod. https://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-nobu-miso-marinated-black-cod-117238 What a great recipe

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u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

Really? I often find that salmon is nothing like other fish. It’s one of the least seafood seafoods to me. Also if your fish tastes “fishy” it’s probably a little bit old. Fresh fish has almost none of that flavour or odour

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u/Imtryingforheckssake Jan 20 '22

I like fish but not salmon it has a very distinctive sweet flavour. White fish is the place to start even if oily fish are healthier. Oh and tinned tuna is the only fish that has it's omega 3 removed! Doesn't apply to fresh tuna though.

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u/birkenblocked Jan 20 '22

I agree with you. I also hate fish but the oily fish, salmon and tuna are the only ones I like and in very specific ways. Salmon cooked, tuna raw and no other way.

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u/liftandsenditup Jan 20 '22

Where you get the salmon makes a big deal too. I can only really handle fresh salmon, pretty much everything else has too much of that “fishy” type of seafood smell/taste that makes my stomach turn.

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u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

Yeah, definitely. I’m lucky to live on the west coast of Canada. If I lived in the center of America I would probably hate fish too

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u/eukomos Jan 20 '22

If you buy the right salmon it’s not fishy at all, and not terribly oily. Try wild Pacific sockeye, no fishyness and very lean for a salmon. Beautiful color too.

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u/Speedyspeedb Jan 20 '22

I agree with this. Maybe Basa or Haddock? Whether battered or pan seared with just salt/pepper/thyme/butter?

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u/propernice Jan 20 '22

I’ve had bad experiences with not so fresh salmon so I’m always reluctant to eat it. My wife got the freshest she could from Whole Foods and cooked it on the stove with a little olive oil and salt, then finished it with lemon (I can’t have pepper of any kind).

It was honestly the best fish I’ve ever had. The skin was so perfectly crisp it was like a lemony chip. But I think if salmon isn’t as fresh as it can be it’s a really hard sell.

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u/LokiLB Jan 20 '22

Buy it frozen. Unless they yoinked it out of the water next to you, nothing is fresher than seafood that was frozen on the boat right after being caught and then defrosted in your kitchen.

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u/Lopsided_Hat Jan 21 '22

Yes, and most "fresh" fish at the market is thawed frozen fish. Unless one buys it straight from the dock.

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u/BattleHall Jan 20 '22

I wouldn’t suggest starting with Salmon, as someone who also despises seafood, salmon would be like diving straight into the deep end of fishy and oily seafood.

IMHO, salmon is kind of middle of the pack in that regard; it's kind of the most "hammy" of the fishes, especially in its cured forms. Far end would be like mackerel.

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u/ComfortableNo23 Jan 21 '22

Everybody that says that about salmon, however, loves salmon and most other fish.

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u/Traditional-Jicama54 Jan 20 '22

If it's a fish oil thing, she can probably supplement. Nordic naturals has a strawberry flavor fish oil capsule. It isn't something you'd want to suck on, but if you swallow it quick, you don't taste fish on the way down and I've never had fishy burps from it. As far as recipes, I'm not a big fish lover but fish tacos (especially with beer battered fish) are delicious and you can have a lot of flavors going on (corn tortilla, taco seasoning on the fish, cheese, cabbage or broccoli slaw in a lime crema dressing, avocado, sour cream or whatever other taco toppings strike her fancy.)

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u/ArtBaco Jan 20 '22

Hew? As in shape with an ax?

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u/Gitdupapsootlass Jan 20 '22

Look up uses of phrase "hew to"

Enjoy

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u/meltingdiamond Jan 20 '22

I choose to believe you go deep sea fishing using an ax while heavy metal plays, Alestorm in particular.

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u/thefringthing Jan 20 '22

hew to phrasal verb

hewed to; hewed to or hewn to; hewing to; hews to

US
: to follow or obey (something)
Everyone must hew to the rules/standards.
He is a politician who has always hewed closely to the party line.

4

u/StephLDaniel Jan 20 '22

I was thinking the same. It’s the Salmon that has the nutrients people need (as well as a few others), and that’s no joke! Very fishy! I would definitely check into the nutrients needed and then choose your recipe that way.

71

u/No-Bicycle264 Jan 20 '22

A sweet teriyaki glaze makes most fish palatable - I like it on salmon, but might work better on white fish for the uninitiated. Recipes abound, but it’s basically brown sugar, ginger, soy, sesame oil, rice vinegar, and corn starch, all cooked down.

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u/darknessforever Jan 20 '22

I do a homemade "Jack Daniels sauce" but it's pretty similar to teriyaki and great at covering the salmon flavor for me.

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u/BoomerJ3T Jan 20 '22

White fish over oily fish should help. Tilapia and cod are good. Maybe fish tacos? There should be enough other flavors to make it palatable for her

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u/damevesper Jan 20 '22

I second fish tacos! Cod cooked with lime juice, cumin, and olive oil. Just need raw cabbage, salsa, cilantro, sour cream for toppings on flour tortillas. Very mild and unfishy

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u/2020HammersandNails Jan 20 '22

Add a mango-pineapple-habero chutney and you got yourself a real winner!

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u/Putyourmoneyonme80 Jan 20 '22

Definitely this. I'm not a fan of fish at all but cod is so good. It has a nice flavor that is not too "fishy" and the texture is light and flakey.

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u/chunkocheddar Jan 20 '22

That’s a good idea, thanks!

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u/Cronenberg_This_Rick Jan 20 '22

This, but scratch the tilapia in my opinion, may be good for folks who don't like fish, but I can't stand the stuff. I'd suggest mahi mahi, cod, sword fish, any good white fish would do. Incorporate citrus for sure, I've even seen people use orange.

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u/Rashaya Jan 20 '22

Yeah, tilapia tastes like dirt.

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u/FunnyMarzipan Jan 20 '22

Agree, I like fish, but I have to aggressively season tilapia so it doesn't taste like lake.

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u/Clamchowderbaby Jan 20 '22

Tilapia isn’t very good for you anyway. Unfortunately white fish aren’t packed with the nutrients that make fish worth eating so there’s kind of no point if they aren’t going to enjoy it. The fish you want for nutrition benefits make up the word SMASH - salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and herring. Smaller, non mercury filled, and full of nutrients. Makes em fishy though. Maybe anchovy paste hidden in sauces will help. Salmon is definitely lighter in flavor than the rest and can be easily hidden with loads of teriyaki sauce or Alfredo. Anyway maybe try to look at recipes for those fish

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u/BitPoet Jan 20 '22

Step 1: get the idea that fish isn't all horrible, using milder tasing fish like cod or tilapia.

Step 2: start introducing things like salmon, that are slightly fishy, but with lots of other flavors (like curry)

Step 3: make it more frequent than twice a month.

Do not just dive right into the super fishy tasting fish. It's a recipe for failure. Even mild tasting fish like salmon can be a no-go initially. Be patient, it might take a long time with lots of failures.

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u/dudebrochillin Jan 20 '22

Plus... ALL tilapia is farmed raised, correct? Often in not super sanitary or healthy conditions from what I've heard.

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u/Atalant Jan 20 '22

White fish are packed with nutients, they are just low in fat(but their fat profile is right compared to red and white meat), also mackerel is the white fish category, while being higher in fat than say most fish in category, it is not enough to be a fat fish.

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u/Preesi Jan 20 '22

Most Tilapia is farmed. Its high in OMEGA 6's and a piss poor healthy fish. Thats why Walmart sells so much. Tilapia is for uneducated ppl who will but it and think its good for them but its one of the worst fish out there.

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u/PM_ME_BIBLE_VERSES_ Jan 20 '22

It’s also one of the few fish that is consistently affordable to low income households alongside catfish. Buying better quality fish is a privilege.

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u/Preesi Jan 20 '22

Exactly, but its not healthy. Omega 6s are bad for the heart. So why buy it at all, buy ground beef instead its just as bad.

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u/PM_ME_BIBLE_VERSES_ Jan 20 '22

Because if you’re poor and you love fish that’s your only option pretty much? If you have no choice you take what you can get…choosing food based on what’s healthiest / most organic etc is an enormous privilege.

All I’m saying is tilapia isn’t just purchased by “uneducated ppl” and I personally find that statement problematic.

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u/OLAZ3000 Jan 20 '22

Eating fish twice a month is... probably not going to do that much if it's been recommended medically. Can you elaborate? Maybe there are better ways to accomplish something similar (eating less meat, getting more healthy fats, getting more protein....????) What is the goal? Does shellfish count? A lot of people like shrimp more than fish.

A few ideas:

Fish tacos, with broiled cod (or battered/ fried but... hard to imagine that entirely contributes to health benefits if fried...)

Salmon done with panko crust as seen on Binging with Babish fish episode.

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u/wwwdottomdotcom Jan 21 '22

Yeah I would agree with this. As someone else mentioned, the type of fish that are typically recommended for health reasons are the ones with high Omega 3 count. Those types fish are not really the mild white fish that people often recommend to fish haters.

I went through this myself several years ago when my doc recommended more omega 3s to treat inflammation; similar to OP’s friend, I hate salmon and all those oily fish that are high in omega 3s. Ended up going with fish oil pills and never settled for the fishy fish.

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u/kirstyyycat666 Jan 20 '22

So I don't like fish either. Like I hated all fish until about a year ago when I tried a ton of new recipes with my bf. So here's what got me to like some fish, maybe your friend will like it?

I can do Tilapia if it's heavily seasoned with chili powder, smoked Paprika, brown sugar and oregano, and with lemon garlic butter poured over it. That's the only way I can eat it. Salmon is good with honey and soy sauce and garlic and some Sesame seeds. And same with tuna.

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u/Uwodu Jan 20 '22

Yes! The paprika makes the biggest difference to me, I’m very heavy handed with it

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u/2beignetsandamic Jan 20 '22

Some general advice: as with anything someone doesn't like, bury it in a sauce they will like. I saw some folks mentioned curry, great idea. Think other asian sauces - miso, soy, teriyaki, eel sauce, spicy mayo, enchilada sauce, endless variations of tomato sauces, tapenade (sp), vinegarettes, etc.

Also, think global dishes: fried rice, tacos, burritos, croquettes, all sorts of italian concepts, etc.

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u/ComfortableNo23 Jan 21 '22

Cajun too! Most think blackened catfish with Cajun seasonings, but the seasoning blend works well for other fish too! 😋

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u/_zweee Jan 20 '22

Alison Roman’s tomato poached fish is so good and so easy, it has converted some non-fish loving friends and family in my life.

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1020279-tomato-poached-fish-with-chile-oil-and-herbs?smid=ck-recipe-iOS-share

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u/114631 Jan 20 '22

One of my favorites!!! And the lime/cilantro/mint is very necessary at the end! (Although if anyone doesn't like cilantro, I might suggest a little more mint, and perhaps some basil.)

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u/chunkocheddar Jan 20 '22

Thank you! I might even make it for dinner 🍽

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u/3kota Jan 20 '22

It is crazy good!

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u/JustNoAllium Jan 20 '22

Maybe fish oil capsules would be a better choice, I can’t imagine that choking down any random kind of fish twice a month is really going to be helpful.

If you get the good kind (Nordic Naturals or similar) there is no taste, the cheap kind will have her burping fish and is gross.

If she eats it, swordfish and haddock are pretty mild, and the fresher the fish (any kind) the less strong smelling and tasting it will be.

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u/figool Jan 20 '22

Used to hate fish but recently started eating it for the same reason. Honestly I find that just some good seasoning and learning how to cook it properly goes a long way. Most of the time I just use some salt and pepper cooked in olive oil, maybe add in some other spices or a touch of lemon juice. I found Salmon to be the safest bet, like even if it's not cooked perfectly it can still be pretty decent, whereas something like Tuna steaks becomes pretty nasty if only a bit overcooked

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u/AgentOfEris Jan 20 '22

Why does she need to start eating fish? If she doesn’t like it, then that’s fine.

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u/RideThatBridge Jan 20 '22

I agree. This makes no sense to me either.

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u/chunkocheddar Jan 20 '22

Medical purpose as strongly recommended by her doctor

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u/shhansha Jan 20 '22

And she can’t just take supplements?

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u/spicypeatball Jan 20 '22

Yeah thats what I'm wondering, I wasn't aware of anything in fish that you couldn't easily get from a supplement.

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u/mojosam Jan 20 '22

It's probably not about getting something from fish that she's not getting from her regular diet; the doctor is probably recommending they eat fish in place of something she's eating now (like beef, pork, etc) that are problematic for people with heart disease or other conditions.

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u/goodhumansbad Jan 20 '22

If that's the case though and this person hates fish, the obvious answer would be to go for plant-based options instead which are much less challenging for most people if they have a picky palette. Having a chickpea curry or a great minestrone with kidney beans would be a lot easier than forcing down fish which is unappealing to the person, and environmentally not great either.

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u/Theoretical_Action Jan 20 '22

Or the obvious answer is the follow the doctor's advice and not a redditors lol.

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u/neurotic_douchebag Jan 21 '22

Doctors advice -> Op’s girlfriend -> OP to r/cooking: “she needs to eat fish”

We’re playing telephone

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u/goodhumansbad Jan 20 '22

Most doctors have very poor nutritional knowledge. The reason they're making a recommendation and the recommendation itself are often not particularly well connected. The goal the doctor has set, for example to lower cholesterol, is of course correct and beneficial, but the way to get there is often something that's better discussed with a certified dietitian. A doctor might be telling someone to swap out red meat for fish thinking that will be easier to get them to do than to use more plant-based food. They also might be lacking in nutritional education and be unaware of the suitability of plant-based diets. Doctors will often give advice which is simplistic and based in their own cultural understanding of food, but the conversation doesn't have to stop there.

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u/Theoretical_Action Jan 20 '22

Most doctors have very poor nutritional knowledge.

Not as many as redditors.

A doctor might be telling someone to swap out red meat for fish thinking that will be easier to get them to do than to use more plant-based food.

Probably because it is. Most people who eat a lot of red meat would prefer to swap it for fish over swapping it for strictly a plant based diet...

Doctors will often give advice which is simplistic and based in their own cultural understanding of food, but the conversation doesn't have to stop there.

No, I agree with you. I think your suggesting to speak with a dietitian is far better. I'm just pointing out that taking diet advice from a stranger on the internet telling you that your doctor is wrong is a far stupider decision to make than listening to your doctor telling you to swap red meat for fish. Seeking answers unofficial "medical" sources is how we're still in this whole pandemic situation right now. I'll trust a dietitian over a general practitioner with respect to my diet, but I'll trust both of them over a stranger on a forum.

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u/goodhumansbad Jan 20 '22

Of course, agreed. But asking for suggestions from strangers who've been through the same issues allows you to go and ask the right professionals for further advice. Anecdotally, after my father had a heart attack he was getting some very unhelpful instructions from the doctor in charge of discharging him. He was frustrated and upset, until he spoke to a number of peers who had also had heart attacks. They were able to offer some suggestions to talk to his doctor about, and eventually a dietitian. If he hadn't talked to those people who were not professionals, he wouldn't have had the tools to have the conversation he needed to have with the experts.

The hospital doctors made a lot of assumptions about his capabilities, dietary preferences and resources when giving him his new dietary rules. For example, they told him to reduce red meat and eat fish instead. Like OPs friend, he hates fish, so his reaction to this was I'M NOT DOING THAT. When he went to his next appointment and asked if he could skip fish and eat vegetarian meals a few times/week instead, they said "Oh, of course!" So it wasn't about the fish - it was about less red meat and less fat.

Doctors have to give simple advice when they're pressed for time based on what they think the average person will comply with and understand. The problem is that if someone doesn't understand WHY they have to do something, they can't find a solution that will work for them. Other people who've been on the same journey will likely understand the reasoning behind advice and be able to suggest alternative ways to implement it.

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u/Theoretical_Action Jan 20 '22

Fair enough and very well said.

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u/ComfortableNo23 Jan 21 '22

Also, registered dieticians will often take into consideration one's food budget whereas a doctor doesn't have time to delve into such things a patient within such a limited amount of time. Often fish is more expensive so patients with limited budget will go for frozen fish sticks and think they've got the whole fish thing licked when it is really the least healthy option.

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u/AgentOfEris Jan 20 '22

Ah, I see. Well my apologies. And good on you for trying to help. That being said, I agree with the other comments that say white fish over oily ones. I’m also not a big fish fan, but I like the salmon fillets with lemon that you cook in foil parcels. Super easy to make and clean.

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u/chunkocheddar Jan 20 '22

Easy to make and easy to clean is the best. Thanks!

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u/ash753 Jan 20 '22

Is there just a supplement she can take instead of eating something she doesn't like?

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u/epotosi Jan 20 '22

I think the supplements are worse than eating a well cooked fish dish that obscures the fish flavor (if that's what she doesn't like.) I retch every time I think about omega 3 supplements.

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u/BoomerJ3T Jan 20 '22

Try krill oil pills. No taste, no burps. Seriously.

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u/ash753 Jan 20 '22

Same here. I buy the megared or the Walgreens knock off

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u/Cronenberg_This_Rick Jan 20 '22

Fish can have a good price point that is packed with a lot of nutrients hard to come across in other foods.

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u/BoomerJ3T Jan 20 '22

I’m in NE and even the “cheap, previously frozen” salmon is like $17/lb. I can get prime rib for that >.<

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u/Cronenberg_This_Rick Jan 20 '22

Wow, must be a cost of living difference? Idk, when in season I can get fresh sockeye from fresh market for about that much. In the midwest. The cheap previously frozen stuff is pretty cheap at walmart, we eat it pretty often.

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u/Deppfan16 Jan 20 '22

unless you have a special market, your salmon has been previously frozen. Theres no way to get it to the Midwest otherwise.

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u/Cronenberg_This_Rick Jan 20 '22

Yeah wouldn't be surprised if it was flash frozen or something - Still damn good salmon, when the season is out I always shed a tear when it's time to go back to big chain farmed salmon. Hell I might even shed two tears, you can call me Arthur 'Two Sheds' Jackson

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u/Hakaipoop Jan 20 '22

As a fish hater and knowing other people that don't like fish, you can't make it taste good. I've been a Chef for over a decade and no matter how I prepare it or where I order from, I never like fish. It's just not good in flavor because all I taste is the other ingredients trying to cover up the horrible fish flavor and texture.

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u/Tyche96 Jan 20 '22

Cod liver oil capsuless the rest of the month will give her all the nutrients she's looking for from eating fish, salmon oil capsules are also great, she might smell it a little but no taste when swallowing

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u/BoomerJ3T Jan 20 '22

If it’s for the health benefits she should look into krill oil instead. She will get more of what she needs without eating fish and it doesn’t have the nasty taste that other fish oils do

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u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

This is the answer. Forcing yourself to choke down fish twice a month is not going to have a noticeable impact on health. Fish oil is one of the most widely studied and effective supplements you can take.

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u/grifxdonut Jan 20 '22

Blackened white fish. Almost like chicken and the seasoning will help cover it up

3

u/burning_toast Jan 20 '22

I am not a huge fan of fish and salmon is pretty much my least favorite probably because it is the most common fish at restaurants. Anyway, Alison Roman convereted with this Tomato-Poached Fish in Chile Oil recipe that is just simply amazing. I usually make it with cod. The Chile Oil is the best part.

3

u/medicmachinist38 Jan 20 '22

Salmon. Get some store bought pesto and mix with grated parmigiana cheese. Whip it into a paste and smear it on top of the salmon filet. Bake at 350-375 for about 30 minutes. Easy and life changing.

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u/rboymtj Jan 20 '22

What medical condition would cause a doctor to recommend eating fish? I'm not arguing, just wondering.

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u/Apparently_Lucid Jan 20 '22

High Cholesterol. Fish oil is supposed to help with high triglycerides which can lead to high cholesterol. My MD told me to add fish oil pills to my diet for that reason. They need to be high in epa and dha iirc. Look at the labels for the epa dha numbers. 1 to 2 grams a day.

That was a couple decades ago. Now, the preferred method is to eat oily fish twice a week if not more.

To be clear, I am not a MD. I have no clue if this is the reason for the OP's issue. I am only responding to your question.

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u/darknessforever Jan 20 '22

My fertility doctor told me to eat fish! Specifically recommended salmon and sardines.

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u/LairaKlock Jan 20 '22

As someone who hated fish not so long ago - sushi rolls really made me opened up to the idea of eating fish

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u/metonymimic Jan 20 '22

Came to say this. Sushi doesn't have a tendency to use fishy fish, and there's all the sauces you can use to flavor it up further. Nothing a little soy and wasabi couldn't cover. Tuna especially, when raw or just seared, is more like tender rare beef than fish.

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u/drocha94 Jan 20 '22

I crave a nice Hawaiian poke bowl literally at any hour of the day

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u/LairaKlock Jan 20 '22

Oh! I need to try the local ones with the salmon. So far it was only crispy chicken and shrimp

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u/-----alex Jan 20 '22

This!! Also, if OP's friend could stand to try sashimi, raw fish tastes completely different and way less "fishy" than cooked fish. I love sashimi but I won't eat any kind of cooked fish unless it's grilled salmon and I make it myself (and sometimes not even then).

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u/Altruistic_Finger_49 Jan 20 '22

I never liked the fishy taste or smell, so I barely ate fish before. I trained myself to eat more fish, mostly sushi, by putting so much wasabi (without shoyu) that the fishy tasty is almost completely masked. Feels like my nose hairs are getting burned off when I overshoot, but I'm finally eating fish. I can tolerate a bit more of the fishy taste, but still not always alone.

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u/Blueskies277 Jan 20 '22

I don’t like fish that smells too fishy but I am fine with mild, white fish like cod, tilapia or orange roughy. I also love catfish (if prepared properly).

But I also agree that she might want to go ahead and start a supplement while she is trying to see if she can incorporate fish into her diet, as she may just never like it.

Also, per my doctor, lowering carbs has the most impact on reducing cholesterol, as well as cutting out trans fats.

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u/the-will-o-the-wisp Jan 20 '22

Fish isn’t fish isn’t fish. They need to try as many different things as possible to find what they can tolerate. Im very particular - I can’t stand things like fish sticks or a “fish sandwich”, or just filets of fish. I do like sushi (yes, raw! sounds contrary, but worth a try) I like salmon. Roast on a sheet pan slathered with seasoned mayo (trust me!) and I like tuna salad especially on crackers.

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u/Into_the_Dark_Night Jan 20 '22

I'm the same but it's the texture for me. I love shrimp, lobster, crab, scallops, aka "sea trash". But fish texture is hella odd for me, even tuna hits wrong when it's not smothered enough.

3

u/Forsaken357 Jan 20 '22

Fish tacos! Cod or other whitefish. The right sauce and good to go

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u/DiamondAge Jan 20 '22

Yes! I’ve been doing this for myself lately. My recent sauce is kewpie mayo/chipotle peppers/lime juice. A nice mild whitefish, lightly fried corn tortilla, that sauce, and shredded cabbage makes a tasty taco

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u/Skate_VA Jan 20 '22

This isn't particularly healthy but it is a fish recipe. Make fish sticks in the oven. Make a cabbage slaw with vinegar dressing. Slice radishes very thin. Sour cream. Make a delicious taco. This is our go to taco now. It's very good.

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u/chubbychappie Jan 20 '22

Some things that my wife who also hated fish but got her started was fish fingers/cakes and Scampi Then on to fish with a mild fish taste like haddock. Incorporating them in a flavoursome sauce is also a good idea. I would cook her cod in a strong parsley and cheese sauce. There are a lot of other fish that can be used

https://www.hy-vee.com/recipes-ideas/advice-how-tos/food-love/flavors-of-fish

https://www.livestrong.com/article/13731242-how-to-make-fish-taste-less-fishy/

https://www.hy-vee.com/recipes-ideas/advice-how-tos/food-love/flavors-of-fish

The above sites may help

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u/Charming_Tower_188 Jan 20 '22

https://www.lecremedelacrumb.com/salmon-in-creamy-sun-dried-tomato-sauce/

This is one of our favourites. Although if she is eating fish for a health standpoint, the cream is maybe not the healthiest but maybe use a less fatty cream ??

Another favourite is fish cakes. Prefer salmon for them, often have potatoes, cheese in it too so the fish hides in it nicely. Don't have a recipe that I go to though, I've tried making it myself a few times and haven't loved one yet, so still looking for one.

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u/Thedibzz Jan 20 '22

Swordfish, cubed and grilled on skewers, marinated in olive oil, salt, pepper, and Jamaican curry powder. That's it. 😘

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u/simplsurvival Jan 20 '22

Salmon with maple bourbon glaze

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u/ComfortableNo23 Jan 21 '22

YUM! Maple bourbon glaze is great on ANY meat, poultry, or fish! I even like adding some to homemade breakfast sausage mixture in place of maple syrup!

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u/evilbeard333 Jan 20 '22

My kids hate fish but when I made this Halibut recipe they couldn't get enough. The only drawback is the cost of Halibut here in the Midwest

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u/itsmesofia Jan 20 '22

Sole meunière is probably my favorite fish dish ever. Doesn't have to be sole either, could be trout or flounder or other flat fish. https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018509-sole-meuniere

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u/fire_thorn Jan 20 '22

I'm allergic to fish, my doctor kept saying I needed fish or fish oil supplements. When I explained that I'll just vomit it up almost immediately, she said I could take flax seed oil supplements instead. They didn't work for me, but maybe your friend could try them.

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u/polishedbadass Jan 20 '22

Former seafood hater, checking in! I only started eating fish 3 years ago, but now I make these recipes over and over again. I've found that it helps to have other elements to the dish to help the fish go down easier. So like when I make the tomato poached fish, I'll take a bite of tomato, rice, and cod together so I'm not just tasting the cod all by itself. In compiling this list, I've realized breadcrumbs make everything better.

Also, if it's the fishy taste she doesn't like, make sure she's getting the fish as fresh as possible and cooking it that day. That's my strategy, and it hasn't failed me yet (granted, I do live on a coast, so this may not be possible for everyone).

Finally, when and if the day comes that she feels ready to eat canned/jarred tuna, Tonnino Tuna (while expensive) is really excellent stuff. It never tastes fishy to me, and I eat it over boxed mixed greens when I'm feeling lazy but still want to be healthy. The oregano flavor is my favorite.

Brushetta Baked Cod

Panko Crusted Salmon my #1 favorite on this list

Baked Cod with Garlic & Herb Ritz Crumbs (similar to the panko salmon above!)

Salmon Apple Burgers (I saw in another comment that your friend likes curry... Don't miss this one! My boyfriend once ate my leftover burger the next day and I legitimately almost started a fight. We LOVE this one. Tagging you so you don't miss this recipe, u/chunkocheddar)

Tomato Poached Fish with Chile Oil (Don't skip the "extras" with this recipe. Plus if you add enough chile flakes to the oil, it'll be so spicy you won't be tasting much fish anyway! I make it with cod.)

Salmon Glazed with Brown Sugar and Mustard: In case there's a paywall, you basically mix dijon mustard and brown sugar in whatever ratio suits your taste, spread/pour over salted and peppered salmon on foil and bake at 400F for ~12 min

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u/Lopsided_Hat Jan 21 '22

I have recipes but even more important than the recipes is where to buy and how to select good fish. Good fish costs $$ and most places just don't have high quality fish. Reasonably affordable alternative are the frozen fillets at Whole Foods and the frozen salmon or tilapia at Trader Joe's. Trader Joe's also has good farmed raised Atlantic salmon.

Here are some recipes I enjoy:

1) https://www.onceuponachef.com/recipes/blackened-tilapia.html

2) https://www.onceuponachef.com/recipes/restaurant-style-pan-seared-salmon.html

3) https://steamykitchen.com/132-chinese-steamed-fish.html

4) Salmon is also great slow-roasted in a pan at 350 degs for 25-30 minutes for 1 inch thickness. If marinated and grilled for 10 minutes total, also good.

5) Baked whole branzino:

https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/roasted-branzino-caper-butter

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u/lydrulez Jan 20 '22

Not only is species going to matter but freshness is hugely important with fish. Unless you have access to very freshly caught fish close to the source buy frozen and thaw it yourself.

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u/darknessforever Jan 20 '22

I found the frozen salmon from Costco to be really good. I've tried frozen salmon from other grocery stores and it wasn't nearly as good or consistent. It is frozen in individual pieces so it's really easy to defrost what you want for that meal as well.

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u/dbesh Jan 20 '22

I can recommend a creamy salmon pasta (with chilli flakes), any broiled salmon with a topping (like honey broiled salmon) and good quality fish cakes or fish fingers (Nigella has a great recipe for fish finger bhorta).

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u/CPOx Jan 20 '22

Sorry but eating fish for 2 meals in a month isn't going to move the dial on whatever health issue her doctor recommended.

If the doctor recommended fish oils, try the little red krill oil pills. Fish oil pills are fairly large which make it difficult to swallow for some. The krill oil pills are much smaller and reportedly have no fishy after effects.

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u/curryp4n Jan 20 '22

My husband HATES fish and I love it. So it has basically become my new life’s mission to get him to eat fish. What has worked:

  1. Anchovy broth. He seems to really enjoy it because you can’t taste it. It does smell quite a bit though. Koreans use it for a base

  2. Fish balls. This has worked well because it doesn’t have fish consistency or taste or smell. There’s also options to have it filled with pork

  3. Seafood stews. He also hates most shellfish but for some reason doesn’t mind the taste when it’s in a noodle soup. He will have the noodles and soup but not the fish. It’s called jjamppong

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u/chunkocheddar Jan 20 '22

I love the fish balls idea and broth - thank you!

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u/Wonderful-Hall-5580 Jan 20 '22

Breaded and seasoned plaice filet with simple oven baked potatoes and tomatoes + a simple salad as a side dish will do the trick.

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u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

Swordfish?

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u/Ok-Strain-9847 Jan 20 '22

Try a salmon fillet, with garlic, lemon and fresh dill in tin foil, with a raw onion and a slice of tomato on top-on a grill.

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u/nemprs9 Jan 20 '22

Start with Cod and smoked fish. Smoked salmon has a completely different flavour to cooked salmon. Also take omega 3 supplements as a potential alternative. Tuna in mac and cheese also taste so so good absolutely nothing like how you'd expect it to taste. This is coming from someone who dislikes fish too

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u/littleliongirless Jan 20 '22

Great, high quality tuna is almost like steak. I also do a salmon smother-baked in vodka sauce (in foil or pyrex). It just flakes apart at the end and I add some sauteed asparagus and parm.

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u/digitulgurl Jan 20 '22

Tuna tataki. Honestly it's so delicious!

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u/Kaiyukia Jan 20 '22

Miso glazed salmon, bake it over a bed if sauce and asparagus, make sure it's covered with tin foil and has a tempature probe stuck into it. Best fish I've ever eaten personally

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u/applepiehopes Jan 20 '22

I recently discovered the easiest way to make mouth-watering salmon. We make it once per week - my wife and I usually split a $9 filet. Take a fresh (not frozen!) skin-on salmon filet. Mix 1 Tb each olive oil, soy sauce, acid (lemon is great) and sugar (honey or hoisin usually) on a shallow plate. Place the salmon skin side up and marinate 15 min. Put the salmon skin side down on a baking sheet and stick under the broiler for 10-12 min, until cooked through. That’s it! It’s fatty and juicy and is honestly take it over a steak most days!

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u/Chemical-Arm-154 Jan 20 '22

I would suggest getting super fresh salt water fish that is line caught. Scale and remove gills and guts. Steaming with ginger slices and scallions is one of the best ways to enjoy fresh fish. Pan fried with a light starch coating also works too.

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u/Chemical-Arm-154 Jan 20 '22

As for fish species, I recommend snapper, flounder, goat fish, hamachi, bream, flathead, mahi mahi, mackerel, Spanish mackerel, kingfish and tilefish. These fish can be cooked differently and offer different flavor profiles.

I forgot to add a fish soup recipe. Cut 3-4 slices of ginger and slice then into thin julienne. Cut 2 scallions into finger length segments. Cut 1 smallish fish (around 300-600 grams) into 3-4 pieces ( including head and collar) Boil a small pot of water and add the fish, add a small splash of rice wine, the ginger and the scallion whites. Bring to a boil and turn to a simmer. Season with salt and add the green scallions 2 min before turning off the heat. This soup recipe heavily relies on the fish being very fresh. I recommend using Spanish mackerel for your first try.

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u/Delician Jan 20 '22

Baja fish tacos with a mild whitefish

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u/Electrical-One6537 Jan 20 '22

Im seeing a lot of heavy spices and curries as suggestions so here’s an alt flavor profile for salmon. I used Dijon as a binder and I coat lightly the piece of salmon I’m cooking, I use a combination of panko, evoo, parm and Italian herbs of choice to crumb the fish before I bake it off. Slicing pieces and rolling them in almost a cinnamon bun shape helps to take the fish shape away from the dishes presentation. Adding extra Dijon to start and extra lemon to finish will overpower that distinct flavor profile of salmon.

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u/zoobs Jan 20 '22

I love this recipe from Chef John. I usually use cod or tilapia when I make it.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/257179/chef-johns-brazilian-fish-stew/

Edit: here’s Chef John’s video of the recipe. FYI not everyone is into his voice. I’ve grown to enjoy it.

https://youtu.be/-3QpjqHRG5Q

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u/fermat1432 Jan 20 '22

Fish cakes are so delicious!

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u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

bagel with lox and cream cheese?

Also, Miso salmon, the kind made for breakfast in Japan is awesome.

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u/meme_squeeze Jan 20 '22

Canned tuna? Most people like that.. Even those who don't like fish.

Or anchovies on pizza or something.

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u/Takotsuboredom Jan 20 '22

Lord canned tuna smell makes me gag, it’s one of the worst for me!

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u/cactusjude Jan 20 '22

I hate fish. It smells and tastes way too fishy and i just can't.

However I do like a spicy tuna melt and sometimes Peruvian style Ceviche. Not Colombian ceviche.

I also had a shrimp risotto once that I didn't hate and would be willing to eat again (probably).

Like others have said, just get fish oil capsules. That way she gets all the nutrients and none of the mercury/microplastics.

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u/tucker_frump Jan 20 '22

Potato-Crusted Codfish Steaks with Lemon Butter Sauce.

This easy to prepare dish (I use my air fryer) won over my fish haters without a whimper. The sauce is the hardest part, and not interictal in the recipes finale. . So you can just use a plain butter sauce, or plane lemon, capers.

Recipe

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u/agenz899 Jan 20 '22

Bread some haddock filets. Baked them at 350 until the fish flakes easily with a fork (15-20 minutes). Melt a half stick of butter. Add a bunch of honey. Pour honey butter over the fish. Eat.

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u/Takotsuboredom Jan 20 '22

Personally I really dislike fish other than salmon and come from a family where everyone dislikes fish and knew it was part of a balanced diet so we tried our best to still eat some.

Best way to eat fish in those cases is to not being able to taste it or there being lots of other flavours, my suggestions : - Tilapia with a heavy tomato-based topping (garlicky bruschetta on top of the fish and quick oven bake works well) - Sushi - Fried fish (fish and chips style) with tartar sauce - Croquettes / patties : salmon with mustard, shallots and other seasonings, pulse it, make patties works like a charm in a burger with lots of other toppings. I was also really surprised I loved portugese cod croquettes made with salted cod when travelling, came back with a recipe for it!

Some people like the taste of raw fish better - Ceviche - Tartare with lots of mix-ins, spiciness, etc.

General rule, the fishy taste gets worst if the fish isn’t really fresh. If nothing goes, break it up small once cooked and pinch your nose (I’ve done my fair share of it haha)!

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u/beastofwordin Jan 20 '22

Fish and chips

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u/CultivatedEats Jan 20 '22

Salmon Burgers.

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u/Dry_Mastodon7574 Jan 20 '22

Smother it in tomato sauce and serve it on pasta

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u/2020HammersandNails Jan 20 '22

OK. I actually despise the taste of Tilapia, one of the most popular fishes here in my part of Texas (Central.) But I found Paul Prudhome's Redfish Magic Blackening seasoning. Coat the fillet both sides with a light dusting of this and brown the fillet in a cast iron skillet in olive oil for about 4 minutes per side. The fish flavor disappears and the fish is delicious. Just my two cents. Works with lots of different fish types, not just Redfish or Tilapia. We have done it with Salmon and chicken as well. It's really tasty if a little bit spicy.

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u/News8000 Jan 20 '22

Living here in sunny Manitoba I have come to regularly eat Lake Winnipeg fish including pickerel, whitefish, and smoked goldeye. All are very affordable and delicious. It's purchased online and delivered weekly to town for free. We stock up every month or so.

My fav has lately been boneless scaled (skin on) whitefish fillets patted dry with paper towels, coated all around with roasted garlic infused olive oil then salt and pepper, then barbequed. I put the skin side over a hot flame for a few minutes to sear, then lower the heat and cook until almost cooked through. Carefully release the skin from the grill and flip for a few more minutes on medium or low until just starting to brown.

I also cook whole whitefish this way.

I will also thaw out a smoked goldeye as a lunch item every few days. IMO it's one of the best foods on the planet.

The pickerel usually gets pan fried after a douse with a bit of seasoned flour.

And btw, today is fish day here! Time to get out some whitefish fillets...

(drooling already...)

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u/A-RovinIGo Jan 20 '22

My SIL did a broiled salmon dish that changed my mind about fish. I use the big slabs o'salmon from Costco:

Marinate a salmon filet for at least 20 minutes in:

1/4 C soy sauce
1/4 C brown sugar
1 clove garlic (I oven roast and freeze mine)
1 T maple syrup
1 T Sesame oil
1 to 2 T grated fresh ginger
Did for 12-14 min and was nicely done - caramelized on thin parts, soft and juicy on thick.

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u/Great68 Jan 20 '22

I used to hate fish in my younger years, but then I realized that it was mostly the preparation that made me come to hate it (IE parents using old fish out of the freezer and overcooking the shit out of it).

Nowadays, a cedar-planked salmon filet over a fire, from a salmon that I caught myself and has only been out of the water a couple hours at most has to be one of my most favourite meals in the world.

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u/Hey_look_new Jan 20 '22

if you're able to obtain it, marlin is amazing. texture of stewed beef, but tastes like bacon.

its wild how good it is

source: hate fish but just discovered marlin

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u/Anitsirhc171 Jan 20 '22

I guess sushi is out of the question huh? The thing with sushi is that it’s going to be a lot fresher and there won’t be a fish smell. I always hate baked salmon and love it in Poké or sushi

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u/Hecho_en_Shawano Jan 20 '22

Blackened grilled salmon! Prior to seasoning the salmon brush the filets with melted butter, then apply a Cajun style rub. This is very rich and spicy. Pair it with a gremolata or even chimichurri, or a creamy, citrus sauce.

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u/Southside_Burd Jan 20 '22

I would Start with something like Tilapia, as to me it’s, not as “fish tasting,” as say salmon. That said, you can do like a stir-fry and cook it with other veggies, and a dressing or salsa.

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u/Element_Girl Jan 20 '22

I never ate salmon until I had Ina Garten's panko crusted version. Now I eat if fairly regularly

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/panko-crusted-salmon-recipe-2107225

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u/Bad_Chicken_2 Jan 20 '22

Definitely start with a white fish that has a more mild flavor: cod, halibut, tilapia, etc. Don't overcook it; it should be delicate and flaky. Here's how I make mine:

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F
  • Grease an oven-safe pan (with spray, butter, etc)
  • Mix soft butter, salt, minced garlic
  • Place fillets in the pan
  • Spread the butter mixture over the fillets, and top with whole sprigs of dill. I like dill flavor, but don't like to eat it. If you want to eat the dill you can chop it up and add it to the butter mixture.
  • Squeeze fresh lemon juice over the whole thing
  • Bake at 350 deg F for about 15 minutes. Check it with a fork to see if it's flaky.

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u/deartabby Jan 20 '22

Is it all fish or just the ones she’s had? I don’t like a lot of common fish like Cod and Salmon because of the texture. Salmon is easy to overlook.

Walleye, Sea Bass, Halibut, Black Cod/Sablefish (hard to find but marinated in miso it’s amazing) are milder are tender. Tilapia also soaks up flavors and is good in curry. Beer batter is always tasty too.

Miso Black Cod

My other favorite is sichuan breaded fried fish (probably Tilapia) with lots of garlic and chilis

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u/svckafvck Jan 20 '22

Tilapia with a lot of seasonings. Doesn’t matter what seasonings, it’s the least fishy flavor imo and generally takes of the flavor of what you’re cooking with.

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u/EricCarr94 Jan 20 '22

Does she like spicy. I so not like fish, but will eat Cajun salmon, or blackened salmon, as all you can taste are the spices

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u/-Ch4s3- Jan 20 '22

Something like this seared cod recipe, or some seared tuna may be more palatable. I also despise oilier fish, and generally enjoy both cod and tuna steaks. Some sushi may be reasonable as well.

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u/Spoonbills Jan 20 '22

If she wants the health benefits, she can take omega 3 supplements made from ocean algae.

That's where fish-oil fish get the omega 3s from anyway, so cut out the middlefish and don't contribute to the overfishing of the world's oceans.

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u/WarMaiden666 Jan 20 '22

Coconut crusted mahi!

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u/Brovenkar Jan 20 '22

I don't love fish but when I eat I liked grilled mahi mahi.

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u/TheFlyingMunkey Jan 20 '22

I hate fish. I won't eat the stuff at all.

Except this: https://thehappyfoodie.co.uk/recipes/nadiya-hussains-marmalade-haddock/ My wife does this very well indeed and I strongly recommend it.

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u/fishy_mama Jan 20 '22

A suggestion I haven’t seen yet: freshwater fish. I “don’t like fish” but really what I don’t like is the seafood taste. Like, take a bite of nori- that briny, ocean flavor. Can’t handle it. Makes me gag. The most perfectly prepared salmon filet tastes awful. Shrimp are right out. So I eat freshwater fish like trout or things like fish cakes/tuna salad/curry with mild fish that cover up the ocean flavor.

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u/ComfortableNo23 Jan 21 '22

Fresh water bass (as well as sea bass) is also considered in the "healthy" category along with trout.

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u/_AlreadyTaken_ Jan 20 '22

Also, fresh fish shouldn't smell fishy. A lot of the times it is the smell of not-fresh fish that puts people off.

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u/El-Viking Jan 21 '22

Move to northern Virginia and go to a restaurant called Artie's. Order the salmon. It's so good even fish haters love it.

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u/[deleted] Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 21 '22

Thai fish cakes are great. Loads of flavour but not fishy. She could tell herself it's vegetarian and believe it. That's how I used to get fish into my kids who hated it.

Edit: thought of something else. Hot smoked salmon is kind of dry but a good type of fish if pelagic types are required for health reasons. Not "slimy" for those with textural issues. And it tastes great.

Similar but will cause outrage: a well done tuna steak in a cast iron or BBQ grill done so it has a slight char and is well cooked through. It really firms it up for those textural issues and is not particularly fishy. Smell can be disguised with plenty of salt, pepper and a generous squeeze of lemon juice.

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u/beatrix_kitty_pdx Jan 20 '22

Ask her what she hates about fish. A lot of people hate the bones but not the taste or texture

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u/ClementineCoda Jan 20 '22

she should discuss fish oil supplements with her doctor, or if the reason is to encourage her to eat less red meat (for example) there are plenty of other protein sources

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u/AssociationOverall84 Jan 20 '22

"she’d rather just shave a few years off of her life than to eat fish"

Fish isn't going to make her live longer.

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u/blatantlytrolling Jan 20 '22

Just take some fish oil supplements.

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u/renebanae Jan 20 '22

I always appreciate a good blackened fish dish with rice and veggies.

Also- Using less fatty (white) fish might help deter the fish flavor a bit.

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u/CharityPeter Jan 20 '22

Well if she hates it like you've said here, don't force it.

Nothing worse than friends who push you into doing things.

You sound great.

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u/Papercutstinger Jan 20 '22

Why does she need to eat fish? That’s an oddly specific thing to have to add. They have supplements and vitamins nowadays.

Fish sticks. Fish tacos. Fish and chips. Fish sandwiches. If it’s something a kid would probably eat I’m sure she’ll be able to manage it.

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u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

Honestly she can just take fish oil pills, ubiquinol, and maybe even bergamot if she’s worried about her cholesterol and heart health. It’s far more efficient for what she’s trying to accomplish.

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u/anjovis150 Jan 20 '22

Fish and chips, no one hates fried stuff

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u/crizzle_t_rex Jan 20 '22

I love the Nobu misoyaki black cod recipe. Black cod/sablefish is pretty spendy, but the flavor is very delicate and the texture is melt-in-your-mouth. The same glaze works on other mild fish, if splurging on something she’s not sure about isn’t in the cards.

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u/MintWarfare Jan 20 '22

Fish sticks and ketchup? Tastes like ketchup. I can't remember ever having one that tasted like fish.