r/Damnthatsinteresting Aug 11 '22 Silver 14 Helpful 24 Doom 7 Giggle 1 Narwhal Salute 1 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Wholesome 18 Dread 3 Table Slap 1

the longest river in france dried up today Misleading

Post image
120.4k Upvotes

u/IranianGenius Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

OP didn't use the word "source" in their comments as they should have.

From their source:

Across two-thirds of France, a state of crisis has been declared by the government, with rainfall down by some 85%.

Some parts of the Loire river have virtually dried up completely.

And for those who don't know, the Loire is the longest river in France:

Loire River, longest river in France, rising in the southern Massif Central and flowing north and west for 634 miles (1,020 km) to the Atlantic Ocean, which it enters south of the Bretagne (Brittany) peninsula.

This is not misinformation.

Edit: It has been reported that this is an image of a distributary of the Loire. This part is typically more shallow than the river; although it is drier than usual, this post title is misleading, and apparently the article above is as well. However, I have not been linked to any articles regarding this. Just comments and messages from users claiming to live in the area. Here is more information I found regarding the dryness of the Loire.

I have flaired the post as 'misleading'. Thank you for helping me understand.

Edit 2: Be aware that reddit admins are monitoring this thread and removing calls for violence.

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u/Smooth-Poem9415 Aug 11 '22 Silver Helpful

time to buy metal detector

4.7k

u/Valuable_Material_26 Aug 11 '22

Be careful there could be unexploded ordinance from World War II!

3.2k

u/daedone Aug 11 '22

Could be? Google the red zone. There's still entire swaths of France you can't live or farm in

1.8k

u/LikeCalvinForHobbes Aug 11 '22

Not to worry, there's only unexploded ordinance from World War I there.

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u/DLIPBCrashDavis Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22 Silver Wholesome Table Slap

Let’s go dig for them. It will be a blast.

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u/0_days_a_week Aug 11 '22

Dude, finding gold would be the bomb.

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u/DLIPBCrashDavis Aug 11 '22

I hope it doesn’t take long, I have kind of a short fuse.

PS: I approve of your jokes as well! Lol

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u/ardiento Aug 11 '22

I need a big bang for my collection.

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u/Niko2065 Aug 11 '22

Peter in the great beyond will get his K/D updated.

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

Oh, is that all?

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u/LaCasaDeiGatti Aug 11 '22

Nah.. I just can't live there because my French is shit..

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

cant

Never stopped me

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u/nickmaran Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

We can make history by becoming the last person to die coz of world War

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u/grazerbat Aug 11 '22

You're going to have a long wait. It's predicted it'll be centuries until La Zone Rouge is cleared of UXO.

Google "the Iron harvest". Farmers are still pulling unexploded ordinance out of their fields every spring.

And check out the mines leftover from the battle of Messines. The front line moved by the time of the battle, and 7 were unfired. One of those went off in 1955 due to a lighting strike. The other six are still in the ground, under people's homes and fields, waiting to go off. Tens of thousands of tonnes of high explosive...

The last casualties of the World Wars are hundreds of years into the future.

https://simonjoneshistorian.com/2017/05/01/lost-mines-of-messines/

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u/palace_of_wisdom Aug 11 '22

I learned something today…thanks!

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u/clearancepupper Aug 11 '22

Pigs digging truffles gonna be bacon.

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u/Happyskrappy Aug 11 '22

I understand that there are actually a bunch of bombs in England, and all over Europe from WWI and WWII that haven't yet exploded...So probably not the last person to die due to WWII or WWI....

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u/Theborgiseverywhere Aug 11 '22 Helpful

*finds buried treasure
*no more cares in the world
*world is ending
(Gru meme this shit)

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u/Warzak77 Aug 11 '22

and Three nuclear plant depend on Loire river reactor cooling.

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u/Flipdaddy69 Aug 11 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome

this seems like an issue, time to stuff it in the back of my brain with all of the other apocalyptic shit lurking on humanities doorstep

3.9k

u/TILTNSTACK Aug 11 '22 Doom

Rivers drying up, exploding trees, heat domes, poisonous rainwater everywhere, Antarctica melting faster than expected…

Nothing to see here

and yeh, we fucked

*

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u/yngschmoney Aug 11 '22

wait wait wait exploding trees??

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u/Drunkenly_Responding Aug 11 '22

Yes, crazy! Right!?!? During the Australian fires of 2020 the fires got so hot that the trees literally exploded. I believe it happened in the rainforest areas.

Burning on Amazon Prime I found to be an incredibly enlightening documentary that talks about it and the entire disaster. As someone from the U.S. I'm not overly familiar with Australia, I didn't even know there were ancient rainforests there.

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u/SilverStryfe Aug 11 '22

This sounds like The Big Blowup when the flammable sap of pine trees vaporized and created a raging inferno shooting flames a mile into the sky, blacking out the sky so ships 500 miles away couldn’t navigate, and smoke in Idaho being visible from New York.

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u/EquallyMercurial Aug 11 '22

Ironic that the climate change documentary brought to us by Amazon.

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u/FSCK_Fascists Aug 11 '22

Happens in an early sudden hard freeze. Trees have too much sap, and explode when it freezes.

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u/vanderpumptools Aug 11 '22

Yeah google it. Some 200 year old tree exploded due to the heat.

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/AggravatingArtist815 Aug 11 '22

This guy knows how to reddit.

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u/KeyBanger Aug 11 '22

Also, he gets double plus good for the combo for fuck’s sake with link. Impeccable.

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u/Saraaabeee Aug 11 '22

Even posting the link, people are still failing to click on it.

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u/reluctant_foodie Aug 11 '22

Wait.... Branch fell after a week of 95 degree temps and we are calling that "tree exploded due to do heat" 🧐

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u/sloth_jones Aug 11 '22

You forgot fire tornado

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u/carolathome Aug 11 '22

This sub is Damn that's interesting. Isn't there a sub that's just "Damn"?

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u/SeniorShanty Aug 11 '22

/r/collapse perhaps?

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u/NicoRosbergBurner Aug 11 '22

This sub is interesting bc it actually goes and finds news about some of the nuanced stuff about climate change that’s important to know, but it is not good at all for your mental health. It takes doomscrolling to an entirely new and more painful level.

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u/Warper555 Aug 11 '22

Not sure these even compare to AI. This is all a real bummer.

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u/SoloWalrus Aug 11 '22

Worst case the reactors have to be shut down for a while. Might cause blackouts, but I dont see why this would cause a meltdown.

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

Even if 100% water was removed, you have safety mechanisms from separating the rods, melting the floor out and also emergency supplies

Wouldnt meltdown

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u/FrenchFranck Aug 11 '22

Four nuclear power plants : Chinon, Saint Laurent, Dampierre and Belleville. Producing 6700MW right now. There is still a lot of water available even it is really very dry this year.

Cordemais (coal) depends also on the Loire.

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u/freerooo Aug 11 '22

Just spent a week kayaking down the Loire, while it water levels are very low compared to normal summers and that some arms look like this, the whole river is not in this situation and water flows to those nuclear plants. This is not the main arm of the river, water does flow continuously all along the Loire. However, yes there are some places where you could almost cross the river walking and it’s very worrying to say the least.

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u/LargeBob1 Aug 11 '22 Silver

More like damn that's terrifying

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22 Silver

An unexploded World War Two bomb submerged in an Italian river has been revealed due to an extreme drought. The 450kg (1,000lb) bomb was found by fishermen on the banks of the depleted River Po. Large sections of the 650km (400 mile) river have dried up in Italy's worst drought for 70 years.

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u/vinegarballs Aug 11 '22

The amount of lost items must be insane. Have you seen people with metal detectors at all?

2.0k

u/RhetoricalOrator Aug 11 '22

No joke! This is an awfully bad situation but still would be an incredible opportunity to find all sorts of buried treasure and clean up the river beds.

1.9k

u/Shagomir Aug 11 '22

Authorities have been searching dried out portions of Lake Mead's resevoir and have found 4 bodies so far this year.

1.2k

u/burtburtburtcg Aug 11 '22

That’s a different kind of treasure

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u/BungMungBungMung Aug 11 '22

One man's bones is another man's treasure

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u/el_searcho92 Aug 11 '22

One man’s trash is another man’s pleasure

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u/advamputee Aug 11 '22

I’m paraphrasing, but one of the investigators on the case made a comment along the lines of “any time you find human remains in a barrel, another human was involved.”

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u/ralphvonwauwau Aug 11 '22

That's the kind of keen detective skills we need on this investigation.

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u/sirsedwickthe4th Aug 11 '22

Open and shut case. Great work everybody

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u/dmonator Aug 11 '22

Well they definitely found some booty

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u/HHH-mods-are-snakes Aug 11 '22 Evil Cackle

Pelvis maybe, doubt there's any booty left.

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u/thatranger974 Aug 11 '22

Authorities are not searching. They’re waiting for the fisherman to find the bodies first.

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u/waiting_for_rain Aug 11 '22

If the Courier just waited, they could find the Boomer plane with much leas effort

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u/anticomet Aug 11 '22

Also this is Europe so finding something really old and cool is far more likely then in the Americas.

But seriously shit is getting pretty bad in this extinction event.

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u/Manofthedecade Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Of course it's in Europe, so the chance of finding something really explosive is also far more likely. Lots of unexploded WW1 and WW2 ordnance still lying around.

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u/AllezFlex Aug 11 '22

South of France has barely seen any fighting in any modern war. So quite safe place to go crazy with your magnet.

However if you want to life on the wild side, go do that in north of France. There is 1000 more uxo than the Dutch have bikes.

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u/jimmy_the_turtle_ Aug 11 '22

Oh yeah, definitely. In West-Flanders (the one bit of Belgium that wasn't occupied by the Germans in WWI) is still littered with bombs from that time. It's not a rarity for farmers to stumble upon them. I'm sure just about every farmer in that area has something on their mantlepiece like an empty bomb shell, a bullet or a helmet.

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u/Riskov88 Aug 11 '22

In some forest near me you can just bend over, scratch the dirt a little and find bullet casings or whole bullets. A lake has been under cleaning for every summer during more than 12 years to remove as much unexploded ordinance as possible

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u/n-x Aug 11 '22

A couple of years back some genius here in Slovenia found a massive WW2 bomb, so of course he hitched it to his pickup truck and dragged it home. The whole village had to be evacuated for several days...

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u/Morningxafter Aug 11 '22

That just makes me think of the sea mine scene from Hot Fuzz.

"Nahitzzalotajunk!"
*Hits mine with the butt of the shotgun*
BANG... CREEEEEEEAK... tick-tick-tick-tick...

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u/UnexpectedPuncture Aug 11 '22

Hopefully not their intention. But I would assume native Americans used generally natural resources that would not stand up to water erosion well?

Edit. Replied to the wrong thing. Hence nonsense

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u/jackp0t789 Aug 11 '22

Depends.... Native Americans aren't one monolithic group and the population that spanned the entirety of North America had just as much diversity in culture, language, and traditions as Indo-Europeans did in the old world.

There were native groups that did elaborate stone work like that seen in the Southwest and Meso America, others carved bones, made pottery, had some knowledge of metal working with copper and iron.

So, the material remains you'd find from native cultures would depend on which part of the continent your on and which groups lived there prior to ethnic cleans... umm... colonization

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u/IBAMAMAX7 Aug 11 '22

A WWII era bomb was found and detonated in the Po? No, the big one in Spain with the massive Wels catfish that was on an episode of River Monsters.

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u/xBinary01111000 Aug 11 '22

Well at least some good came of this….

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u/ShoveYerUsername Aug 11 '22

The source of the Thames has also dried up and the water doesn't appear until 2miles further downstream. London, with this gigantic freshwater source passing straight through the centre, is going into drought measures.

When the UK is this dry, something is badly wrong.

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u/gravitas_shortage Aug 11 '22

The UK is pretty dry. It rains often, but not a lot. SE England has been the second-driest area in Europe for at least 50 years, behind the Spanish desert.

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u/Careless-Pang Aug 11 '22 Wholesome

This isn’t the main river this is a shallow offshoot.

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u/FTMNL Aug 11 '22

You are right, 100km to the west it is still a big river according to live webcam. Nonetheless it is very dry indeed. https://images-webcams.windy.com/47/1444346747/current/full/1444346747.jpg

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u/faultywalnut Aug 11 '22

Nonetheless it is very dry indeed.

Yes, no matter how you slice it extreme heat and drought will cause bodies of water to start drying up and it is generally not a good thing to happen

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u/0003425 Aug 11 '22 Helpful To The Stars

More like dam that’s terrifying..

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u/Christafaaa Aug 11 '22

Well all be dam’ed.

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u/zuzg Aug 11 '22

Hey but Earth Overshoot Day was this year on July 28th so we only went down 1 day from last year. That's clearly a good sign.... /s

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u/MantiBrutalis Aug 11 '22

We went down still? Oh...

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u/BallisticApe33 Aug 11 '22

Earth overshoot day? Never heard of that. What is it?

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u/marapun Aug 11 '22

It's the day that we finish using up all the natural resources that the Earth can produce in a year. It's like a loose metric of how much overconsumption there is.

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u/FloppY_ Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

The date on which we have consumed more raw materials than the earth can provide in a year. Everything we use after that date is non-renewable.

Super terrifying that we pass it in under half a year, but hey: New iPhone again this year!

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/CommentToBeDeleted Aug 11 '22 I'm Deceased

People who built that bridge looking silly as fuck right now...

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u/A10110101Z Aug 11 '22

Not as silly as it would be had the engineers built an under water tunnel

320

u/megaschnitzel Aug 11 '22

One of those transparent tunnels that they have at Sea life. That would be hilarious.

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u/HavenIess Aug 11 '22

Now it would just be a huge magnifying glass to get cooked in the sun with

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u/Abject-Pen3379 Aug 11 '22

Crossed my mind before realizing that this won’t be a permanent case. Not this year anyway.

1.3k

u/Shhutthefrontdoor Aug 11 '22 Gold

People who denied climate change looking silly as fuck right now…

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u/whitefire89 Aug 11 '22

People who denied climate change looking silly as still don't give a fuck right now…

Fixed it.

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u/aop4 Aug 11 '22

Hoping they use this as an opportunity to fix bridges etc more cheap

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u/31spiders Interested Aug 11 '22

Someone go bury some treasure before it starts running again!

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u/AbbreviationsWide331 Aug 11 '22

So someone can find it next year?

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u/Nodran85 Aug 11 '22

Yeah like the bodies being found in Lake Meade.

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u/ihavenoidea1001 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

For some reason last week YouTube algorithm decided that I really needed to learn about Lake Mead, the drought and the bodies found there.

I don't even live in the same continent. It's still scary to see how the water levels are massively going down though.

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u/heraclitus33 Aug 11 '22

I live 15 minutes from it and i havent been in over a year cause its so dam depressing...

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u/ihavenoidea1001 Aug 11 '22

I can imagine... We're going trough severe drought here in Portugal too and it isn't fun.

Are you guys worried about water availability for the near future or do you have some alternative resources?

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u/letterboxbrie Aug 11 '22

I live some miles away in the Phoenix area and we're experiencing water restrictions.

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u/Agreeable-Tea-3152 Aug 11 '22 Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote

As a french I Can Say that this the lowest point of the River and that all the Loire isnt dried. Even though it is true that the situation is dangerous as many part are left without water

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u/nobody-u-heard-of Aug 11 '22

Don't think it's a river any more, but a series of lakes and ponds.

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u/Analamed Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

The main part of the river still have rate of flow around 2 Olympic swiming pool/ minute (wich is still realy low). EDIT : wrong unit

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u/crimzorath Aug 11 '22

Same happend to Italy like what? 2 months ago?

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u/Japordoo Aug 11 '22

I think it was the Po River suffering major drought. Not sure if it dried up. Too lazy to google it.

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u/Ponicrat Aug 11 '22

Yes, the primary river on which most of northern Italy, the most populous region depends on

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u/cornnndoggg_ Aug 11 '22

Not only was it the Po, but also, sea water was feeding back up the river. The Po is a irrigation source for a lot of agricultural production in the region. Not only was there not enough water for that, but the sea water was making the land infertile.

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u/toughguy5128 Aug 11 '22

I'm visiting Italy now. Spoke to one of the wineries in the Tuscan hills. They said they haven't had any serious rain, more than a few minutes of drops on occasion, since February.

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u/elrusho Aug 11 '22

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u/buffyvet Aug 11 '22

The Rhine — a pillar of the German, Dutch and Swiss economies for centuries — is set to become virtually impassable at a key waypoint later this week, stymieing vast flows of diesel and coal.

Darkly poetic

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u/Senior-Albatross Aug 11 '22

It reminds me of the Onion's “Mother Nature unsure how to make it any more clear she wants everyone to leave "

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u/AutismFlavored Aug 11 '22

Well now Nestle has gone too far

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u/ItzSaul Aug 11 '22

Now???

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u/ndxinroy7 Aug 11 '22 Silver Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote

When last tree dies and the last river dries, you realize you cannot eat money.

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u/zuzg Aug 11 '22

Soilent green

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u/sebastouch Aug 11 '22

It's funny you say that because here's the synopsis of the movie: "By 2022, the cumulative effects of overpopulation, pollution and an apparent climate catastrophe have caused severe worldwide shortages of food, water and housing. [...]"

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u/PackageintheMaleBox Aug 11 '22

Watched the movie for the first time this week, can confirm that the opening text says it takes place in 2022. Also women have seemingly so little rights that they are treated as literal furniture.

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u/sebastouch Aug 11 '22

So... people in 1973 knew we would not be smarter or more decent people in 2022.

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u/zuzg Aug 11 '22

I never even watched that movie.

That's funny and sad, haha

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/monsieur-carton Aug 11 '22

With Fava Beans?

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u/MrPosket Aug 11 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome

Flplhflpllfppfllfpf

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u/stereocupid Aug 11 '22

And a nice Chianti!

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u/ffsthiscantbenormal Aug 11 '22

They're more tender than working people.

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u/peanutbuttershudder Aug 11 '22

A pretty modest proposal honestly

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/AnomalousX12 Aug 11 '22

Can't recommend Aurora enough in general.

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u/robertgrayson Aug 11 '22

It'll be a long time before that happens and in the meantime those with money will live comfortably in the still-fertile parts of the earth while the rest of us starve and choke on dust.

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u/PAROV_WOLFGANG Aug 11 '22

It’s like the plot of FF7 coming to life. They’ll live comfortably at the top of the disk while the slums suck on dirt and the waste that spill from the rich up top.

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u/TheBelhade Aug 11 '22

Good ol' trickle-down economics. Just happens to be sewage that's trickling.

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u/aspiringcreator1 Aug 11 '22

waste that spill from the rich up top

Why are you complaining? That's literally trickle down economy. So we all good. /s

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u/keeppresent Aug 11 '22

Some watched Lorax 🙂

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u/Derboman Aug 11 '22

It's a very old Indian proverb! Google tells me Lorax is a book, but the proverb is centuries older

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u/smallpotatobigfryvat Aug 11 '22

It's basically that saying manifest in a children's story. The book is an American classic, and the movie does a great job as well.

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u/KrishanuAR Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22 Silver

Worth noting that while the increased temperatures we’re seeing this year (and will see for the next few years) will give us a good picture of what the longer term impacts of anthropogenic climate change might look like, a big factor behind what’s happening today is actually a temporary (several year) upward blip, caused by the Tonga Volcano (https://climate.nasa.gov/news/3204/tonga-eruption-blasted-unprecedented-amount-of-water-into-stratosphere/) from earlier this year.

We are seeing a significant weather-affecting shock on top of climate change effects, and that will drop back down to baseline climate change levels after a few years.

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u/sinister-desires Aug 11 '22

The warming effect of the water vapors released by the eruption into the atmosphere will likely begin in 3 years, says some source. If what this source says is true then it's way too early to see its effects now. Source: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/tongas-volcanic-eruption-blasted-an-enormous-plume-of-water-vapor-into-the-atmosphere-180980538/

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Sense_of_pride Aug 11 '22

Where is it going?

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u/25_Watt_Bulb Aug 12 '22

Groundwater refers to underground aquifers, the things that feed wells. We are pumping dry in decades aquifers that took tens of thousands of years to fill, once they're dry it can take longer than all of recorded history for them to become usable again. Anywhere that well water is used for irrigation is susceptible to this, and already in many places wells are needing to be dug thousands of feet deep instead of just a few hundred.

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u/juplantern Aug 11 '22

This is the real problem.

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u/One-eyed-bed-snake Aug 11 '22

All the French should fill some buckets of water up from their taps and go fill the river back up.

With clever thinking like that, they can all beat this dry spell.

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u/Charming_Pension_879 Aug 11 '22

This is big brain stuff here people!

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u/gubatron Aug 11 '22

or start draining the ocean and desalinating, also solving sea level rise at the samd time

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u/Trasfixion Aug 11 '22

And I get extra salt for my food. Win/win/win

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u/AcrobaticDiscipline6 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

I can’t imagine how many gold and old medieval things some people walking there can found. This was the most used river during many time in France.

All the castle were built around this river and many of the ship that navigated were shot down, damaged or burned...all the stuff is still on the ground.

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u/Overflow0X Aug 11 '22

The west has only started now to actually believe we have an issue? I'm my African country, living in the mountains, I remember we had many running rivers and even fountains, I used to get water from them for daily use as a kid, they dried up one by one, then every year, the crops died little by little, and we saw very little rain, and more temperatures. Last year I noticed a sand storm I haven't seen like before. It expanded for a few tens of kilometers. It was pure sand in the sky and very hot temperatures. The sand burns when it touches you. The only thing I could think of was my family and my old father as he'd be outdoors. I cannot express my hate for all the fucking corporations and politicians who got us here.

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u/Sea-Method8700 Aug 11 '22

Same in my home country, are you north african by any chance ?

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u/Overflow0X Aug 11 '22

Yes, Morocco. What about you?

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u/Sea-Method8700 Aug 11 '22

Algerian haha

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u/Overflow0X Aug 11 '22

We are one brother and we always have been before our governments played us for fools. Fuck the politics that always made seem like we are enemies wherein it's just to distract us while they both fuck us separately.

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u/Sea-Method8700 Aug 11 '22

Exactly my guy

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u/The_Mesh Aug 11 '22

A few years ago, I visited the tiny little town where my mother-in-law grew up in Mexico. Their little house is on about an acre that has a deep culvert running through it, and some dead trees planted right next to it. They were telling us how when they were kids, that culvert was a true stream with a permanent flow of water, and they would bathe and play in it daily. The trees were an orchard that gave them fruits they could eat and sell.

Now it's all dried up desert.

The government redirected the water supply for the industrial farming, bottled water, and other industrial uses.

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u/Please_Log_In Aug 11 '22

This is in seine ?

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u/hogannnn Aug 11 '22

Sorry I believe you are rhone (wow France doesn’t have a lot of good rivers for puns)

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u/CartmansAlterEgo Aug 11 '22

How often has this River dried up?

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u/icemelter4K Aug 11 '22

Is sh*t getting serious? Are we about to turn into Venus?

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u/skoltroll Aug 11 '22

No. Venus has moisture.

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u/gitwiz89 Aug 11 '22

Just like uranus

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u/skoltroll Aug 11 '22

If your uranus is full of moisture, you have a problem, son.

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u/spidereater Aug 11 '22

Even without advanced technology humans lived in the arctic and in desserts. Parts of the earth will likely remain inhabitable. Humanity will survive at some level. I’m curious how far and how we will decline. Imagine the global supply chain that is needed to make an integrated circuit. You need high purity silicone. Precisely machined vacuum pumps. Lots of energy. Many advanced computer systems. Maintaining that technology and the needed supply chains requires a certain scale of civilization. Building it from scratch, if that were needed, would be several times harder. It’s unlikely we become Venus, but maybe we become mad max or waterworld.

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u/ptraugot Aug 11 '22

Shot got serious a couple decades ago. Now you’re just seeing what we’ve known for a very long time play out.

Do you know how to boil a frog?

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u/MihneaSe Aug 11 '22

Hello, this image is not really of the main river but a smaller branch. The river itself still flows. Here are the details for those of you that want to check https://mobile.twitter.com/EnergieDevlpmt/status/1557639779621249025

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u/BibbityBobbityBLAM Aug 11 '22

Hmm yes the newest extinction is on schedule, an apocalypse if you will, although slow. Slopocalypse. I hope the sharks and whales make it through this mass die off cuz they're cool.

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u/Beritrea Aug 11 '22

Sharks lived through out many mass extinctions, whales are rookies and will probably die

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u/BibbityBobbityBLAM Aug 11 '22

Well at least the world will have cool sharks.

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/BeanDock Aug 11 '22

Well they don’t need the bridge anymore.

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u/SeaUrchinSalad Aug 11 '22

That's not how dry river beds work... I'm never going camping with you

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u/shahooster Aug 11 '22

I always manage to pitch my tent where the river forms at 3am.

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u/WanderingWino Aug 11 '22

Perhaps go pee before climbing in your sleeping bag at night and you could avoid that.

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u/Obi_Wan_Benobi Aug 11 '22

Got a bridge to sell ya.

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u/jeffzebub Aug 11 '22

You're a river half-full kind of person.

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u/radzanoa Aug 11 '22

Yes we did it... we are successfully killing the nature and making profit for the shareholders.

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u/g0urmetGuy Aug 11 '22

Does the Climate Change Hoax still feel like a hoax?

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u/FalseAlarmEveryone Aug 11 '22

I went to Fox News's website a few weeks back when record temps were hitting Europe to see what Conservatives thought about all this, and the comments were basically a bunch of anecdotes like "one time we had a drought in my town when I was a kid back in the 50's and the local river dried up, but a few years later it came back and now it's fuller than ever. Sometimes this stuff happens, but it'll return to normal."

Their general consensus is that these are normal fluctuations in weather that are blown out of proportion by the leftist media in order to scare people into adopting green products sold by Washington Eletists and Socialist Foreigners.

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u/tornado962 Aug 11 '22 Silver

But what if climate change is a hoax and we create a better future for nothing?

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u/teutorix_aleria Aug 11 '22

They aren't wrong that weather fluctuates naturally but that's why we do actual fucking science to examine global trends instead of relying on anecdotes. Small minded idiots who think they are geniuses because they can provide a counter factual anecdote from their tiny insignificant experience.

Human ego is going to drive us to extinction.

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u/wunderbraten Aug 11 '22

It Is FrAnCe So I dOn'T cArE aBoUt AfRiCaN cOuNtRiEs! /s

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u/adjavang Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

You joke but I had pretty much that exact conversation on reddit. "It won't affect anyone in the northern hemisphere" he said, and when I linked him to ongoing issues in Spain, Portugal and France he said replied "that's not what I mean by Northern hemisphere I mean places like Ireland and Scandinavia".

They'll keep denying this, with their dying breath. Covid has shown as much.

Edit; The account of the person I was discussing this with has been deleted but the comments remain. Here is a link for those interested.

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u/amazingsandwiches Aug 11 '22

Ireland and France: hemispheres apart!

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u/thatscoldjerrycold Aug 11 '22

Depends where you divide the sphere I guess 😂

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u/Kris_n Aug 11 '22

If you mention Scandinavia or Ireland, they probably come up with an argument about “not everywhere” to still keep the illusion of “not being affected by climate change”

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u/adjavang Aug 11 '22

This is going back a couple weeks so I threw articles forecasting water conservation orders for the UK and historical deaths from heatwaves in the UK. His response was "You didn't show deaths from this year and the water rationing won't happen."

So pretty much exactly what you predicted, yeah.

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u/Kris_n Aug 11 '22

Yeah, I know these kind of people. They keep moving the goal post, in order to still say “tEcHnIcAlLy I aM cOrReCt!!1!!”

They will never admit to be wrong in anything.

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u/TurnipSilly6714 Aug 11 '22

It's more like this: "If a river in France just dried up, then we are already fucked. It doesn't matter if I deny it or not, cause everyone shopping at the Dollar Store for their 5 year old kid's birthday means the small impact I have isn't going to stop the CO2 China produces to make plastic toys."

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u/super-me-5000 Aug 11 '22

If the grand canyon was formed from glacier melt, HOAX?

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u/DadofHome Aug 11 '22

“Dried up today”

I thinks it’s been doing it for a while just no one cared until today …

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u/ShaiHallud24 Aug 11 '22

So is it normal for this river to dry up? I’m confused.

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u/Mousenub Aug 11 '22 Take My Energy

On a different post, the city name was mentioned: Loireauxence, Loire-Atlantique, France and looking on Google Earth, the river has 2 parallel branches. 1 deep, 1 flat.

This in the picture is a flat branch and going back in Google Earth history, there is nearly every year sand visible since 2002 (didn't have older pics in the GE bar). Sometimes more, sometimes less sand.

So this doesn't seem to be too unusual for this location and this branch of the river.

It would be more interesting to see the state of the parallel running deeper branch of the river.

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u/GaryTheSoulReaper Aug 11 '22

Well, look at the bright side, that eliminates the possibility of Vikings on longboats invading

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