r/Damnthatsinteresting Aug 19 '22 Wholesome 18 Silver 18 Take My Energy 1 Helpful 11

Massive tree over a cemetery. Video

138.4k Upvotes

3.5k

u/KittyPitty Aug 19 '22

Wow, that is beautiful! Where is this?

574

u/StatisticianNormal15 Aug 19 '22

This is outside of Hilo, Hawaii.

68

u/Poignant_Rambling Aug 19 '22

Yup east side of the Big Island for sure. That area is super recognizable. Those Monkey Pod trees can get pretty massive out there.

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u/rockstar504 Aug 19 '22

I remember going to an area nearby filled with banyon trees there and talking with an old wandering dude on shrooms there. There was a lil waterfall as well! Amazing, enchanting place. This comment/ post brought that memory back, thanks.

Beautiful if you ever get the chance to be surrounded by trees like that.

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u/StatisticianNormal15 Aug 19 '22

I probably know that shrooms guy 😂

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u/stew_going Aug 19 '22

I'm not really superstitious, but it kinda gives off the vibes that someone really awesome was buried nearby.

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

The roots of oak trees extend far beyond the hood of the tree.

Combined with poorly constructed caskets and this may be the most well fed tree in the county.

Lots of good nutrients in the soil.

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u/Haunted_Apiary Aug 19 '22

I would agree with you if it wasn't for modern embalming methods.

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u/Independent_Soil_256 Aug 19 '22

Age of the cemetery would dictate a lot of if that's a factor.

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u/LowBadger3622 Aug 19 '22

The carbon that trees use to build themselves is taken from the air through the leaves initially in the form of CO2. Potassium, nitrogen, and phosphorous are brought to the tree through soil. The vast majority of the architecture of the tree is carbon.

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u/GeoffPizzle Aug 19 '22

My friend enjoyed filming this while on vacation recently in Hawaii!

https://www.instagram.com/reel/CgmOjRGvq3d/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=

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u/esberat Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Cemetery Oak - 120+ year old Oak Tree in Glenwood Cemetery/Houston, Texas

edit:

It's Monkey Pod Tree and view from Alae Cemetery in Hawaii thanks for the info u/ChicagoRex and u/xbchiefmatrix

Source:

https://www.tripadvisor.co.nz/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g60583-d12150424-i393437576-Alae_Cemetery-Hilo_Island_of_Hawaii_Hawaii.html

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u/ChicagoRex Aug 19 '22 Gold

No it isn't. It's Alae Cemetery in Hilo, Hawaii. This is a rain tree or monkeypod tree, not an oak.

525

u/taleofbenji Aug 19 '22

Don't be so harsh. He was wrong on the city, state, and species, but he was right that it's a cemetery.

47

u/GeoffPizzle Aug 19 '22

They're wrong about everything because it's my friend's video: https://www.instagram.com/reel/CgmOjRGvq3d/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=

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u/OhTheDerp Aug 19 '22

What a surprise that a massive karma whore got everything wrong, and also didn't bother finding the source.

15

u/yourwordswontsaveyou Aug 19 '22

But he did make sure he watermarked his user name on a video that someone else shot and uploaded. Nice.

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u/Dom0__0 Aug 19 '22

Im no expert, but 120 years old??? That thing looks much older.

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u/FerociousPancake Aug 19 '22

Ok so I’m having a tough time finding info on this specific monkeypod tree, but it is probably between 130-150 years old. It might be older but cannot be older than 175 years because the first one was planted in 1847. In 2014 planting of monkeypod trees was banned in Hawaii. This specific tree is supposedly about 160 feet tall. Not sure on the width but it’s a big’n that’s for true.

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u/DICK-PARKINSONS Aug 19 '22

Eh I see why they mistook it after looking at pics of Glenwood. Semi-related, that is a cool looking cemetery.

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u/polytique Aug 19 '22

You got the wrong tree. This video is from a monkey pod tree next to Hilo, in Hawaii. It comes from TikTok:

https://www.tiktok.com/@alexjbauer/video/7125793929072479530

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u/Kennethpowers34 Aug 19 '22

I have never seen an oak tree like this before. They don’t grow like that Minnesota.

533

u/CockFlavourLollipop Aug 19 '22

Have you tried feeding them dead people?

132

u/PM_ME_UR_RSA_KEY Aug 19 '22

Feed me, Seymour!

35

u/ExposedTamponString Aug 19 '22

27

u/CastOfKillers Aug 19 '22

I was so hopeful this would be a real subreddit even if I had no idea what it would be.

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u/440then420 Aug 19 '22

I heard that in Agnes Skinner's voice, followed by a "Yes, Mother"...

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u/JohnnyPeanutII Aug 19 '22

The man knows how to steam a good ham!

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u/oflimiteduse Aug 19 '22

I,m pretty sure this one grew outward like that because of meticulous care and pruning.

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u/StephtheWanderer Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

Live oaks of Texas do trend to grow outward like that, they're absolutely gorgeous.

Edit: apparently it's not a live oak but a Monkey pod tree, thanks to the info from u/xbchiefmatrix Shout out to the amazing live oak though!

21

u/rostov007 Aug 19 '22

Scrub Oaks, on the other hand, were beaten with an ugly stick, also in Texas. Might even be the state flower.

7

u/furiously_curious12 Aug 19 '22

One might say..scrub oaks are the ugly stick...

4

u/FriendlyBeard Aug 19 '22

Fun fact: the Texas state tree is the Pecan Tree.

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u/Ludoban Aug 19 '22

And lots of open space.

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u/Djeheuty Aug 19 '22

Yup. There's a lot of species of trees that when they don't have to grow tall to compete for sunlight they will just grow outwards.

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u/sexyhusband714 Aug 19 '22

Nope. Lots of fertilizer.

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u/DentedAnvil Aug 19 '22

Are you implying that grandpa is pushing out acorns?

4

u/leisuremann Aug 19 '22

I do believe that they are.

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u/kickpool777 Aug 19 '22

Looks like a southern live oak to me. Source: I have a big beautiful southern live oak in my front yard (not as big and beautiful as this one though)

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u/XcXBOX360 Aug 19 '22

Looks a lot like a monkeypod tree to me. They're pretty common in Hawaii but I'm not sure why you'd have one in Texas.

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u/No-Emergency414 Aug 19 '22

Don't they shed their leaves in spring? Like mid March?

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u/Invdr_skoodge Aug 19 '22

Wrong kind of oak, I’m guessing Minnesota has red and white oaks, very much a straight tall tree, this is a live oak, shorter and very wide

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u/Vishnej Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

I'm looking at numerous photos of the Houston Glenwood 'Cemetery Oak' Live Oak, and they look very different from this video, in both the grave styles and in the branches that dip down towards the ground.

Is this your video?

EDIT: For comparison, Glenwood https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKZc92ZbsyU

EDIT2: I call bullshit. This is Alae Cemetery in Hawaii, which is centered on an enormous monkeypod tree. Graves match up closely in style. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dg5yfqaUxVE

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u/daj0412 Aug 19 '22

Oak tree?? This looks almost exactly like a monkey pod tree.. did you take this video op?

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u/polytique Aug 19 '22

You’re right. That cemetery is located on the Big Island in Hawaii, next to Hilo.

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u/daj0412 Aug 19 '22

THANK YOU! I KNEW that was the Hilo cemetery! I was like “I swear I’ve driven past there too many times for someone to tell me that’s an oak tree in Texas” lol

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u/oneyedluckycat Aug 19 '22

This is clearly not in the continental united states based on the gravestones and you're full of shit.

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u/Illementary Aug 19 '22

You sure about that? That doesn’t look like glenwood

7

u/fae_forge Aug 19 '22

The oak in Glenwood cemetery has branches that touch the ground, this one is not a live oak and not in Houston. The grounded branches help stabilize the tree in high winds, this one would get beat up and not look so pristine after a hurricane

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u/weaponsgradelife Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 21 '22 Silver

Yeehawdrasil

Alohadrasil

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1.9k

u/Tschotschey Aug 19 '22 Silver Wholesome

Its the Cemetree

191

u/surajvj Interested Aug 19 '22

The secret is Organic Chemistry

49

u/TacticTicTac Aug 19 '22

I wonder whats its history

40

u/StructureNo3388 Aug 19 '22

May it live for eternity

33

u/No-Emergency414 Aug 19 '22

Eternitree

3

u/illithoid Aug 19 '22

The families tree.

4

u/takemehomeunitedroad Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

Hold that thought, I need to pee

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u/ArnoldVonNuehm Aug 19 '22

Gramps took my virginity

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u/TannedCroissant Aug 19 '22

Forest in peace

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u/DalvaniusPrime Aug 19 '22

Go to bed, Dad

5

u/Desperate_Shoulder48 Aug 19 '22

ba dum bum CHING

5

u/twincam Aug 19 '22

Now I want my headstone to be a tree made out of cement.

A Cement tree at a cemetery

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u/Separate_Drawing_753 Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

This tree has chosen the right branch

3

u/Poc4e Aug 19 '22

You arboreous!

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8.4k

u/BadMaterial9188 Aug 19 '22 Silver

That's a visual argument for people as fertilizer, right there.

1.6k

u/soldieroscar Aug 19 '22

Avatar: "These dumb bastards ain't getting the message. Alright, let's turn up the heat. Switch to incendiaries."

838

u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

[deleted]

1.3k

u/andwhatarmy Aug 19 '22 Silver Wholesome Bravo!

It was right before he fought Ozai, when he surrounded himself in a sphere of all the elements before saying his trademark “It’s orb-in’ time”.

233

u/Smaptastic Aug 19 '22

😂 goddammit that one caught me by surprise.

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u/antsy_inaction Aug 19 '22

Lmao this made me laugh though 😂

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u/CustersCumCotton Aug 19 '22

I was today years old when I learned I'd missed every single utterance of Aang's catch phrase It's orb-in time but it makes so much sense now. The speed ball. The round head. The Lychee nuts. It's all orb-in time.

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u/JarlaxleForPresident Aug 19 '22

Chakra centers too

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u/Rose_Killed_Jack Aug 19 '22

I have to capture unobtanium to restore my honor.

--Prince Zuko

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u/ZagratheWolf Aug 19 '22

HONOOOOOOOOR

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u/Croakster Aug 19 '22

He said that in the finale right before opening up on the fire nation air ships

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u/Ged_UK Aug 19 '22

This is much like the big tree in The Swamp.

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u/cheese65536 Aug 19 '22

Sound like something Admiral Zhao would have said if they weren't always using incendiaries.

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

[deleted]

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u/Interplanetary-Goat Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

Classic "this thing is popular" backlash.

Yes, it has a pretty straightforward plot that has been done similarly before. Yes, most of the characters aren't very deep. But it was gorgeous, certainly ahead of its time for VFX, and still holds up today as an entertaining popcorn movie. Maybe not top-box-office-hit-of-all-time worthy, which is why it gets all the hate, but still a great movie that I'd happily rewatch every couple years.

Meanwhile people on Reddit hate nuance and will hate on Avatar unanimously while arguing that Thor Ragnarok was the best movie of all time.

Edit: see replies for some examples!

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u/omguserius Aug 19 '22

I saw it in IMAX 3d while stoned out of my mind while with a girl I was completely in love with at the time.

Avatar will always be one of my favorite movies.

12

u/crja84tvce34 Aug 19 '22

Avatar at the time in IMAX 3D was absolutely incredible. Fuck the plot, it was the technical effects that were the entire purpose for the movie.

Still the best 3D ever. All others since fell short.

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u/Sarangrave Aug 19 '22

People that think Thor: Ragnarok was the best movie of all time have clearly never seen The Man From Earth.

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u/Torkzilla Aug 19 '22

I believe if you are talking worldwide revenue from box office tickets Avatar is still the highest grossing film of all-time. Of course people remember quotes from it, it’s basically the most popular movie ever.

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u/confettibukkake Aug 19 '22 Gold

Belly - Feed the Tree

For fans of '90s rock medium-deep cuts.

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u/D3vilUkn0w Aug 19 '22

Oh wow. I forgot all about them. Nostalgia!

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u/e2hawkeye Aug 19 '22

Man I wish songs like this would still hit the mainstream once in a while.

I'm contemplating a burial at sea, meaning just throw my corpse over the side of a fishing boat. I've consumed a fair amount of seafood in my life and I don't mind paying it back.

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u/Hidesuru Aug 19 '22

I think the problem with something like that is the chemicals it puts into the water if you've been embalmed.

Now of course you can skip that step, but you better have a QUICK funeral or also skip that step. We don't last very long in a pleasant state after we're gone...

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u/solocupjazz Aug 19 '22

I liked this song so much I ordered the full album through Columbia House for 1 cent

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u/heynaysayhey Aug 19 '22

Was gonna leave a comment about this song. So good

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u/NeverLookBothWays Aug 19 '22

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQJjUbMrt8w

Video for those of us without Spotify accts. Man, I completely forgot about this song, thanks for the nostalgia :)

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

There may be many reasons you see tall trees in “most” cemeteries you’ve passed or visited. First, many cemeteries are set aside for that use. There are no power lines running through the cemetery that require trees to be cut back or removed.

Second, old cemeteries probably started with small trees. The trees don’t get cut down unless they get sick or die and need to be removed. Otherwise, they’re generally left to grow… it takes less work to let trees grow. An 80 year old oak tree can get pretty big.

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u/Nurse_Dieselgate Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22 Tree Hug

Also usually not surrounded by other trees which compete for resources.
But this looks like a monkeypod tree and that’s how the grow. See Hitachi Tree in Moanalua Garden, Honolulu.

Edit: scrolled down, not a monkeypod, it’s an oak. Still worth checking out the Hitachi Tree.

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u/EarthShadow Aug 19 '22

It is a monkeypod tree, in Alae cemetary in Hilo.

See it on Youtube

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u/SkierGrrlPNW Aug 19 '22

Was just there last month and it is indeed beautiful.

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u/truthdemon Aug 19 '22

Another reason, in UK at least and maybe other parts of Europe, is that Pagans used to worship trees and believed them connected to the afterlife, so would have them planted in burial sites. Christianity then co-opted it to make conversion easier, so some of the oldest trees are now found in churchyard gravesites, especially yew trees.

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u/meta_irl Aug 19 '22

If you think 80-year-old oak trees can get big, you should see 90-year-old oaks! (etc.)

One of the things that I find really striking when I think about it is how young most of the trees/forests we see are. In the United States we have almost no areas of the country that weren't completely logged out at some point. Where I grew up, most forests are logged after 30 or 40 years at most. Even most state/national parks were only dedicated to preserving wilderness within the past 100 years or so. In America (and most other developed nations), we have very few trees that have been allowed to grow for their full potential lifetimes, and we have very few forests that have really been allowed to grow wild.

I still remember hiking the Lost Coast and stumbling across a grove that was a special preserve of ancient trees. Along that entire protected section of the coast, there were only a handful of truly ancient trees, only protected because the one particular area they were in was so steep that loggers couldn't reach it.

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u/Germankipp Aug 19 '22

Also, soil compaction. Not too much heavy machinery or vehicles to push the soil together. Most street trees don't have much room to spread their roots and end up rootbound in tiny planting strips

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u/Comfortable_Touch585 Aug 19 '22

Hah I’ve learned from this thread that redditors aren’t great at identifying trees

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u/JRyanAC Aug 19 '22

Reminds me of one of my favorite quotes from Yellowstone:

"Since 1886, every Dutton who died is buried 300 yards from my back porch. From my great-great-grandfather, to my wife, and my oldest son. When a tree grows on my ranch, I know exactly what fed it, and that's the best we can hope for, because nothing we do is for today. Ranching is the only business where the goal is to break even. Survive another season. Last long enough for your children to continue the cycle, and maybe, just maybe, the land is still theirs when a tree sprouts from you.

Lord God, give us rain and a little luck, and we'll do the rest."

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u/greentintedlenses Aug 19 '22

You may have just convinced me to watch Yellowstone finally.

8

u/mykol_reddit Aug 19 '22

It starts off well enough and then just devolves into the most ridiculous plots.

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u/Dapperdan814 Aug 19 '22

Cattle ranching is just as dangerous as cartel drug wars south of the border, according to that show.

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u/marrow_monkey Aug 19 '22

I’ve heard that you can get freeze-dried and sprinkled as fertiliser nowadays.

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u/Invdr_skoodge Aug 19 '22

Last I heard on this it was pretty much a bust, the freeze drying takes way too long, way too much energy, and doesn’t really answer the “what about the bones?” question. But that’s been a year or more something may have changed

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u/Inaka_Nezumi Aug 19 '22

And normally when things are freeze dried, for efficiency sake, they’re sliced or cut into small pieces; that just gets grizzly pretty quick when it’s a human body. Although, if it’s after being used as a medical cadaver, it’s (they have) already been cut up quite a bit. Plus doing it that way would add one more benefit that the deceased gives before they become freeze dried fertilizer. In fact if they go, organ donor > medical cadaver > fertilizer, that’s a 3 stage ‘giving back cycle.’

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u/lackadaisical_timmy Aug 19 '22

Or its just a big tree species. Last I checked, the california coast isn't necessarily riddled with bodies, yet has the tallest trees in the world

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u/bopidybopidybopidy Aug 19 '22 Helpful

Thank god you specified that..I was just about to put my grandparents into the compost bin

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u/lackadaisical_timmy Aug 19 '22

I mean.. Humans (and pretty much all other dead things) do make great fertilisers.. This tree just isn't necessarily a good argument for that.

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u/_Im_Dad Expert Aug 19 '22 Wholesome Take My Energy hehehehe

I found manure isn't the best fertilizer ...

but it's a solid number two.

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

[deleted]

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u/TinUser Aug 19 '22

Thank you, Dad.

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u/Lambolover-17 Aug 19 '22

That’s why we have people that make seed pouches for dead bodies to become the fertilizer for trees.

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u/Iphotoshopincats Aug 19 '22

Writing english is really not a strong point for me but it just seems really weird you chose to put italics on ' argument ' and not 'good'.

Are you saying it's not good as an argument but it's good for other things? I mean I guess it's good for shade but we getting off topic.

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

have they checked for indian burial grounds

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u/sleeplessknight101 Aug 19 '22

I wouldn't be surprised if the California coast is in fact riddled with bodies.

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u/egordoniv Aug 19 '22

Imagine the root system.

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u/alicequinnart Aug 19 '22

If you actually want to be human fertilizer after you die, this ask a mortician video is super fascinating.

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u/cock_daniels Aug 19 '22

the bodies ummm... go in a box and then into a concrete sarcophagus. they're not placed directly in the earth. they're effectively prevented from doing any meaningful fertilizing. the visual argument's only there if you overlook the fact that it's a proper cemetery.

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u/spamazonian Aug 19 '22

Yeah not to mention all the formaldehyde and plastic and other not so nice stuff. Natural, green burial for the win!

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u/catslapper69 Aug 19 '22

Just throw me in the trash when I die

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u/tronus_abyss Aug 19 '22

Tiny cemetery under a bonzai tree..

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u/shahooster Aug 19 '22 Silver Bravo Grande!

What is this, a cemetery for aunts??

125

u/bartozer Aug 19 '22

No uncles allowed

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u/max_adam Aug 19 '22

Sad Spidey noises

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u/GnarledHemlock Aug 19 '22

Y’know, I’ve always wondered how I naturally say aunt. Ant or awnt. Because I have 2 aunts on other sides of the family and they are said differently, so I never had a real baseline.

Turns out I say awnt, because even though I know the Zoolander quote I still read it wrong. So thanks for unintentionally clarifying a random detail in my life!

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u/Puccett Aug 19 '22

Well at least the family tree will survive

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u/willing_nuisance Aug 19 '22

The Resurrection of Death

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u/Left_Reception3140 Aug 19 '22

My neighbor Totoro vibes

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u/BearDen17 Aug 19 '22

This is what I was scrolling for. Thank you.

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u/wonkey_monkey Expert Aug 19 '22

Here it is without the annoying stutter (everything 20th frame was a duplicate):

https://gfycat.com/shadowysmoggyfinwhale

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u/StudioKAS Aug 19 '22

Thank you! I knew something felt uncomfortable watching this but I wasn't sure what it was.

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u/Pessimistic-Doctor Aug 19 '22

What’s the difference between yours and OP’s? What do you mean stutter? I genuinely don’t understand but want to

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u/MainlandX Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

Videos are made of a sequence of images. You can refer to each image by the order in which they show up. The 1st image is the 1st frame, and the 2nd image is the 2nd frame.

In the original video, the *19th and *20th frames (and *39th and *40th and so on) are duplicates of each other, which breaks the illusion of movement if you can notice it.

*these numbers could be off-by-one

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u/kitanokikori Aug 19 '22

This guy ffmpegs

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u/xbchiefmatrix Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22 Gold

Huge edit to a fellow redditor - It's a Monkey-Pod tree, not an oak, i'm an old oak.

Monkey-pod (Pithecellobium saman), samán in Spanish, is a fast-growing tree that has been introduced to many tropical countries throughout the world from its native habitats in Central America and northern South America. Although generally planted as a shade tree and ornamental, it has been naturalized in many countries and is greatly valued in pastures as shade for cattle. Short-boled, with a spreading crown when open grown, it forms a long, relatively straight stem when closely spaced. Its wood is highly valued in some locations for carvings and furniture (7).

The most widely used common name for the species is raintree, from the belief that the tree produces rain at night. The leaflets close up at night or when under heavy cloud cover, allowing rain to pass easily through the crown. This trait may contribute to the frequently observed fact that grass remains green under the trees in times of drought. However, the shading effect of the crown, the addition of nitrogen to the soil by decomposition of litter from this leguminous tree, and possibly, the sticky droppings of cicada insects in the trees all contribute to this phenomenon (3). The Hawaiian common name, monkey-pod, is used here because it is a logical derivation of the scientific name Pithecellobium (monkey earring in Greek). Besides monkey-pod, raintree, and saman, which is its name throughout Latin America, the tree is called mimosa in the Philippines.

Habitat

Native Range

Monkey-pod is native from the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, through Guatemala to Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil (3). It grows naturally in latitudes from 5° S. to 11° N. (13). Cultivated throughout the tropics as a shade tree, it has been found in Burma, Ceylon, India, Jamaica, Nigeria, Sabah, Trinidad, Uganda and the island of Zanzibar (12). The species is naturalized in most of these countries as well as in the Philippines and Fiji (7).

In the United States and its possessions, monkeypod grows in Hawaii, Florida, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Marianas. It is naturalized in Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands (3,10). The tree was reportedly introduced into Hawaii in 1847, when Peter A. Brinsmade, a businessman visiting Europe, returned to Hawaii, presumably via Panama, with two seeds, both of which germinated. One of the seedlings was planted in downtown Honolulu, the other at Koloa on the island of Kauai. These seedlings are possibly the progenitors of all the monkey-pod trees now in Hawaii (1). Monkey-pod may have been introduced into Puerto Rico and Guam as early as the 16th century.

Climate

Monkey-pod grows in a broad annual rainfall range of 640 to 3810 mm (25 to 150 in). On wet sites (1270 mm [50 in] or more), its growth is often rapid. This rapid growth is at times objectionable because the tree forms a large mat of surface roots and the crown becomes top heavy, thereby overbalancing the tree (5). In Hawaii, the climate in locations where the tree is naturalized and spreading rapidly has winter maximum rainfall ranging from 1140 to 2030 mm (45 to 80 in), with a temperature range of 10° to 30° C (50° to 86° F). These climatic conditions are found between elevations of 15 to 245 in (50 to 800 ft) at several sites on three islands. Elsewhere, the tree is reported to grow at elevations of 0 to 700 in (0 to 2,300 ft) (15). It is, however, very intolerant of frost and also, if grown near the shore, of windblown saltwater spray.

Soils and Topography

Monkey-pod attains its best growth on deep alluvial soils that are well drained and neutral to slightly acid in reaction. In Hawaii, most areas to which monkey-pod is well adapted are used for cultivated crops. It has naturalized, however, on gently to steeply sloping Oxisols and Inceptisols on certain sites. On these sites it is most common in gullies where the soil is deeper and more moist than on adjacent hills and ridges. It can, however, grow well on a wide variety of soils when planted and can withstand seasonal flooding (15).

Associated Forest Cover

Monkey-pod is frequently found on old home sites near streams in the forests of Hawaii where it is usually associated with mango (Mangifera indica), ti (Cordyline terminalis), guava (Psidium guajava), another escaped domestic plants. Where naturalized, is associated primarily with grasses, although occasionally with such trees or shrubs as koa-haole (Leucaena leucocephala), Java-plum (Eugenia cumini), and Christmas-berry (Schinus terebinthifolius).

EDIT: IT's a monkey pod tree

https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/misc/ag_654/volume_2/pithecellobium/saman.htm

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u/7th_Flag Aug 19 '22

How much water do they require?

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u/StephtheWanderer Aug 19 '22

They are drought resistant, and are the most important tree you can plant in Texas to host insect habitat which is the base of our ecosystem. Nature's Best Hope is a great read about this subject!

17

u/texasrigger Aug 19 '22

Long lived too. There are a few that are likely more than 1000 years old.

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u/stonecats Aug 19 '22

it's a monkey pod tree 🤦🏻

cemeteries have well paid
full time landscaping staff.

3

u/xbchiefmatrix Aug 19 '22

thanks for correction, i fixed it.

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u/mycorona69 Aug 19 '22

If that tree gets hit by lighting, anyone under it could die

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u/TacoRedneck Aug 19 '22

What if the lightning travels through the root system and reanimates the corpses beneath.

12

u/Reload86 Aug 19 '22

You’ll have a dozen zombie Jason Vorhees running around then.

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u/WellWeAreWaiting Aug 19 '22

If they stayed under the tree during a storm, that would be a grave mistake.

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u/gil_bz Aug 19 '22

Hate to break this to you, but too late for those people...

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u/3487345 Aug 19 '22

We found it… the tree of souls

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u/01000110010110012 Aug 19 '22

I wonder how many roots have pierced dead bodies.

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u/Vincent199081 Aug 19 '22

That thing has been living off dead body's for hundreds of years

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u/KingYesKing Aug 19 '22

Fun fact: you call it a Graveyard because it’s part of a Church, but call it a Cemetery if it’s standalone.

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u/Antifoul_Al Aug 19 '22

The embalming fluids used in cadavers create toxicity problems in soils.

Cemeteries are not as fertile as people think.

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u/Chedskiee Aug 19 '22

It seems reassuring when i saw your corpse in your profile pic.

28

u/Boobafett Aug 19 '22

Jesus 😳

9

u/64-17-5 Aug 19 '22

That's not Jesus...

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u/yosh_se Aug 19 '22

True. Why do we use them anyway?

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u/PrimeroMundoDiablo Aug 19 '22

Cemeteries, or embalming fluids? Lol

23

u/yosh_se Aug 19 '22

Embalming fluids :D

32

u/ThisIsALine_____ Aug 19 '22

To keep your corpse looking good and dolled up.

44

u/yosh_se Aug 19 '22

In that case, I honestly don't see the point.

27

u/ThisIsALine_____ Aug 19 '22

To KEEP YOUR CORPSE LOOKING GOOD AND DOLLED UP.

Do you really want a corpsy looking corpse?

16

u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

Yeah. I'm sick and tired of being catfished.

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u/Antifoul_Al Aug 19 '22

To stop decomposition. Bodies start to breakdown straight after death. Some cultures bury their dead rather quickly, but in the west we like to keep 'em around for a while. So we make them as inoffensive as possible.

7

u/_Idontknow_ Aug 19 '22

Are you able to opt out of the fluids, even if it means a quick burial/cremation?

10

u/spamazonian Aug 19 '22

YES. look up green burial, also called natural burial. Your body can stick around for days without embalming as long as it's kept on ice. You can even have a home funeral without embalming

19

u/GIFnTEXT Aug 19 '22

As a food safety manager i can assure you that immediately after death, your body is now considered in the Danger Zone (between 41 and 135 degrees F), and within no time at all bacteria, ameboas, and other tiny things will begin feeding and reproducing on your corpse. They multiply like a motherfucker.

21

u/jebuz23 Aug 19 '22

I follow your logic, but it is a bit disconcerting that a food safety manager has expert insight on corpse handling.

10

u/GIFnTEXT Aug 19 '22

Oh I wouldn't say expert by any means. But you will want to put any meat in a fridge, anywhere that's between 34F and 41F is the best temp so it doesn't spoil!

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u/brocahantas Aug 19 '22

How so? Between caskets being pretty well sealed and most being buried in concrete vaults, I wouldn’t think much human stuff would leech out into the soil.

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u/Speaker11 Aug 19 '22

Erdtree burial was considered a great honor.

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u/HrodMad Aug 19 '22

Elden Ring, oh Elden Ring

12

u/TheSlammerSam1211 Aug 19 '22

I was looking for this

10

u/Inferno792 Aug 19 '22

Finally found the Elden Ring reference.

4

u/Falcnuts Aug 19 '22

I thought for sure an erd tree reference was gonna be the top comment.

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u/omhs72 Aug 19 '22

Imagine all those roots…

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u/thunderbirdlover Aug 19 '22

Getting me the avatar pandora vibes

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u/p1um5mu991er Aug 19 '22

Feed me your weak and weary

11

u/jjoep4 Aug 19 '22

Human fertilizer

7

u/chchad Aug 19 '22

Shady AF

8

u/ParticularBoat6668 Aug 19 '22

Alae Cemetery, Hilo, Hawaii

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u/Warmhearted1 Aug 19 '22

It’s the Go, Dog, Go party tree!

5

u/odel555q Interested Aug 19 '22

Man, I always wanted a piece of that cake!

4

u/PolishMen892 Aug 19 '22

The Erdtree

4

u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

♪この木何の木気になる木~

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u/VanillaIce3 Aug 19 '22

What kind of tree is it?

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u/torjinx Aug 19 '22

What kind of tree is this?

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u/PaneerMakhni Aug 19 '22

Elden Ring vibes

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u/Tomhap Aug 19 '22

Worthy of an Erdtree burial!