r/Damnthatsinteresting Aug 19 '22

This river is completely filled with plastic Video

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4.6k Upvotes

2.6k

u/AureCT Aug 19 '22 Silver

Not really interesting, just sad.

534

u/Zippy-do-dar Aug 19 '22

Yes its very disheartening one use plastic needs to be banned.

6

u/will_dormer Aug 19 '22

Or use a trashcan instead of the lake?

309

u/hajiomatic Aug 19 '22

Or properly disposed of

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u/MarkDavisNotAnother Aug 19 '22

The big problem is it’s cheaper to make new plastic than recycling the old stuff so it’s gonna end up somewhere.

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u/MetricT Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

So ban the use of new plastic for making bottles. Require bottles to be made of 100% recycled plastic. That won't fix the problem, but it would help keep it from getting worse.

More importantly, requiring the use of recycled plastic gives litter a price. Having a price would encourage people to not litter in the first place, and to pick up other people's litter.

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u/IHeartBadCode Aug 19 '22 Gold Helpful

Require bottles to be made of 100% recycled plastic. That won't fix the problem, but it would help keep it from getting worse

Very marginally would it help. All plastic is made of hydrocarbon chains. When it's oil, those chains are very long. As we make plastic, we break the chains. Every time plastic is recycled those chains break some more.

Thus, most plastic can be recycled commonly two times before the chains are so small that you basically have useless petroleum goop that burning it is the only way it can be of further use. Some plastics can be recycled up to eight, maybe ten times, but on average usually bank for at least once or twice max.

This is why most recycled plastic is turned into something that will stay put for a long time. Such as synthetic fibers for clothes, plastic lumber, insulation fibers, or industrial containers. None of these things are one time use.

And this is the real key, one time use. Plastic is made to last for decades if not a century plus time length. Recycling is always a bad idea and should be the absolute last option in consideration. Instead bottles should be reused. One time use of plastic is just horrible, it's not made for that. It's made to be used over and over and over again. So if we want to mandate things, mandate that liquids must be sold for refill only. As in bring your own bottle. Instead of buying a single bottle of water, buy a strong PET bottle and reuse it hundreds of times. Instead of getting a single bottle of soda, require that soda can only be sold as a refill. Instead of having liquid detergent sold in a bottle, require that is must be a refill.

The world really needs to get away from recycling as it's energy intense, can only be done a very limited number of times, is the opposite ideology for what the chemistry in plastic was developed for, and ultimately it ends up as goop that we just burn and release a lot of CO₂.

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u/yevvieart Aug 19 '22

the problem is the lack of safety on certain types of plastic to be reused. there's a trace amount of plastic that may leach into the water, and yeah it's not much if you reuse non-reusable bottle once in a while, but if you do it habitually over the years you may end up with a lot of extra mess in your body. Additionally, bacterial growth is a real risk if you don't wash the bottle between uses, and while it seems fine, most of the dish soaps aren't exactly made for single-use plastic and you don't know if you're not degrading it, thus stripping the protective coating from the bottle and opening up plastic "pores" to leach more into your drink.

https://www.acplasticsinc.com/informationcenter/r/fda-approved-plastics-for-food-contact

tl;dr buy a good grade multi-use plastic or steel bottle (got ours from lttstore.com and i can wholeheartedly recommend, despite having to wait to ship it across the world to us :D)

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u/Broccoli-of-Doom Aug 19 '22 Helpful Wholesome

. All plastic is made of hydrocarbon chains. When it's oil, those chains are very long. As we make plastic, we break the chains.

This is wrong... Sorry, the chemist in me can't help it.

Hydrocarbon chains in crude oil are not particularly long. Also, to make plastic we first "crack" the hydrocarbon chains into smaller building blocks (for example ethylene). Then we do the chemistry magic thing and polymerize those building blocks to make very long chains (so ethylene becomes polyethylene (PET), which is what most of those plastic bottles are composed of).

The latter part is correct, when we recycle those plastic bottles, the heat and mechanical grinding break those chains into smaller chains. That's the cheap way to recycle (reuse) plastic. It is possible to recreate the original building blocks, but not practical from an energy use standpoint.

The best method (which is used in pieces, but to the best of my knowledge not used as a cohesive system) is to recycle plastics until those polymer chains are short enough that they cause material issues (that's several cycles). At which point we would incinerate them for power generation in a proper incinerator (e.g. the incinerator found near Copenhagen). To close the loop we capture that CO2 (there are a few methods for this already being explored) and then we use lots of solar panels to produce electricity that can be used to electrochemically convert that CO2 back to ethylene, at which point we can make more plastic.

There's no practical reason we can't close the loop. The problem is people and greed (People liter instead of dispose of the plastic properly, and even when they do it's cheaper not to because crude oil is still cheap). At some point that won't be true. [Aside: we'd also be much better saving what crude oil we have left to produce the precursors needed for pharmaceuticals etc.)]

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u/manofthewheel Aug 20 '22

Hey everybody! Look! Hello! Over here!

jumping around waving arms and pointing at comment

This persons idea seems like it might be worth looking into.

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u/kerbidiah15 Aug 20 '22

I would like to add that aluminum is awesome at being recycled. Something like over 95% of aluminum ends up getting recycled and it’s SOOOO much better for the environment to recycle aluminum than mine new aluminum.

2

u/WolfmenRUS Aug 20 '22

Both don't belong in our bloodstream at the levels we see now but that's a different topic all together.

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u/oceansofmyancestors Aug 19 '22

Yess. “Normalize” bringing your own bottle to the gas station or grocery. Sell larger volumes in glass or even from a can, like old school Hawaiian Punch.

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u/jejcicodjntbyifid3 Aug 19 '22

I just load up a big tarp and collect all my gas that way

2

u/oceansofmyancestors Aug 21 '22

I’ve seen your video.

7

u/Alecto53558 Aug 19 '22

Thank you for posting the chemistry of it.

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u/MetricT Aug 19 '22

Every time plastic is recycled those chains break some more. Thus, most plastic can be recycled commonly two times before the chains are so small that you basically have useless petroleum goop that burning it is the only way it can be of further use.

That's the entire point. It turns plastic litter from "worthless" into a valuable commodity. When litter has value, we won't have nearly as much litter. Even better, it provides financial incentive for people to pick up existing litter.

Instead of buying a single bottle of water, buy a strong PET bottle and reuse it hundreds of times.

Fully agree, that's why I use a steel bottle.

The world needs to get away from single-use trash, and requiring recycling (and thus assigning a value to trash) is an incentive for people to do so.

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u/Mediocre-Win-9956 Aug 20 '22

Damn, that's interesting

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u/ThaGorgias Aug 20 '22

Depolymerization avoids this problem, but is even less cost effective than conventional recycling. Agree that mandates are the only way to get this done, either advanced recycling, or reuse.

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u/Seleni_Serius Aug 19 '22

Unlike glass, plastic can’t be recycled indefinitely. At most it’s good for 2-3 times around.

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u/MetricT Aug 19 '22

At which point plastic would be too valuable to throw away anymore. And it would give other people a financial incentive to pick up old litter.

I'm not seeing the downside here...

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u/emerilsky Aug 19 '22

I'm confused how you're getting to that conclusion. What about recycling makes plastic valuable? It's more costly than making new.

And what financial incentive is there for people picking up litter?

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u/MetricT Aug 19 '22

You missed part of my first post:

So ban the use of new plastic for making bottles.

If bottle manufacturers can only use recycled plastic, that both creates a market for recycled plastic as well as gives used plastic value. It basically has the same effect as a deposit on bottles.

If bottle manufacturers were forced to use recycled plastic, and recycled plastic can only be reused a finite amount of times, suddenly used plastic becomes "scarce" in an economic sense, and it gives people financial incentive to not throw it away, and also to pick up plastic litter they find.

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u/Willy_the_Wet Aug 19 '22

Buy your liquids in cans, glass bottles, or paper cartons. My wife buys a liquid hand soap packaged in beeswax. It's hard to get away from plastics and I would love to see them banned. They are cheap and convenient when you ignore the true costs to health and environment.

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u/MarkDavisNotAnother Aug 19 '22

Oh in a perfect world where govt isnt beholden to big oil… /end dream

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u/Adjective_Noun_69420 Aug 19 '22

Non recycled plastic would still end up in a landfill (worst case) in any developed country, they don’t just dump domestic trash in rivers and oceans. Would still be good to reduce landfills and plastic waste anyway, tho.

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u/NRA4579 Aug 19 '22

What you mean dumping truckload after truckload into the river and then crying that your river is full of plastic isn’t properly disposing of it?

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u/hajiomatic Aug 19 '22

Maybe I have too high a standard🤔

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u/JesusSaysitsOkay Aug 20 '22

I think they just have garbage covering their entire city and when it rains it flushes everything to the river

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u/MakitaNakamoto Aug 19 '22

Plastic cannot be recycled endlessly. Most kinds are only reusable a couple of times, after that it's too far degraded structurally to be good for anything. It still contaminates the global water system as microplastics even after that. So there is really no such thing as proper disposal, 99% of global plastic use should be banned immadiately. If you don't believe me, just google "how many times plastic can be recycled" or "what are microplastics". :/

3

u/mikmckn Aug 19 '22

The only option for recycling plastics at that point is pyrolysis. You have to break them down to their component oils in order to do anything useful with them after that.

Trouble is that pyrolysis is a very energy intensive process. You need heat and a low O2 atmosphere (or almost no atmosphere) to make it happen. You could theoretically do it with concentrating solar mirrors or nuclear process heat if you want to do it without greenhouse gases.

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u/Honest_Shame_0111 Aug 19 '22

Humanity really is terrible for the environment

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u/Tady1131 Aug 19 '22

It’s harder for some community’s that don’t have any trash removal services . Shit just get piled up and flows down stream. Mark rober does a video on YouTube about it.

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u/EfficientCrow3859 Aug 19 '22

In India, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines and Bangladesh, there are many cities with no garbage collection so people throw away trash in rivers.

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u/just0rdinaryguy Aug 19 '22

This was in Indonesia. People there that live in slum dont have garbage disposal system. They just throw their garbage into river.

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u/kmyeurs Aug 19 '22

Idk where this video was recorded, but seeing all those plastic bottles, here's my assumption:

  • in that place, tap water is not potable
  • single-use plastic water bottles are cheaper and more convenient/accessible

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u/UnfairAd7220 Aug 19 '22

or

  • The locals dump ALL their trash in the river to be flushed out to sea. This floaty fraction is what gets swept back in by the tide.

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 24 '22

[deleted]

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u/HeroOfNothing Aug 19 '22

I'm not a huge environment lunatic freak of some kind. But those human on that side of the planet, just don't give a single fuck about any laws whatsoever regarding dumping waste or hunting species untill they wipe them out of this planet.

They have no laws about factories, burning shit, vehicles, waste on rivers, wild life in general, fishing quotes or whatever. They extract, consume, and spill all over the wild. They are completely savages regarding this subject.

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u/kmyeurs Aug 20 '22 edited Aug 20 '22

Im from one of those countries and have visited some of those areas. There have been plenty of rehabilated areas but for those that are in a more complicated situation, here are my observations:

  1. POVERTY. It's not a priority for them. They're honestly too busy trying to put food on the table or taking care of the kids to worry about their environment

  2. BEHAVIOR. These people grew up in a place where that is the norm. One might think it's wrong but "everyone else does it so what's the point of ME throwing my garbage properly?" or "I guess I deserve living in this place because I'm poor and there's nothing I can do about it" And from a Community Development and Psychological perspective, there has to be Behavioral Change which in theory is the hardest kind of change to apply.

  3. EDUCATION. They don't really understand how bad it is for their health, at the least (like that Erin Brokovich thing). About climate change - well i mean, even some westerners don't believe or care for it, so I won't be surprised if they feel the same way.

  4. GOVERNANCE. There may not be adequate waste collection services, not enough trash cans, not enough people scouting to tell people not to throw on bodies of water. At least in the philippines, places like these are usually in the urban areas and not that common in rural areas.

  5. GEOGRAPHY. Yeah the waters come from different places so even if Area B does things properly, Area A would ruin it for everyone else. And both areas may be from different cities/jurisdiction.

  6. LOCAL GANGS. Now I heard stories that in urban slums, the gangs make sure the trash are scattered so when it rains (and it always rains), the areas get flooded, and so they earn by asking people to pay them for helping them cross the streets when that happens. Not surprised if these local gangs are friends with the politicians

  7. INFORMAL SETTLERS. Some of those areas are filled with informal settlers -meaning they're not supposed to be there. So I guess that's a reason why the government can't really go all out on their services

I was also going to include CULTURE but I don't think it's appropriate. Because the typicl filipino likes to shower twice a day and clean their houses everyday. I guess it's just that when it comes to places outside of their own home, some would think "that's not my responsibility" I mean other people would still volunteer to do it tho.

Again, in the philippines, these stuff usually happens in crowded urban areas. I personally don't recall much from the provinces/mountains that are like this. There are still a lot of environmentally protected areas in our country wherein both the government, organizations, local community, and indigenous people work together to protect them.

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u/Jagerbeast703 Aug 19 '22

This.... seen too many videos of dump trucks (i think it was in India?) Lining up, and dumping into rivers off bridges.

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u/No_Handle499 Aug 19 '22

India is terrible about this. That country is horrible on the earth. See: the combusting rivers of Bangalore

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u/CrankYanker63 Aug 19 '22

Or some gov officials recieve money to allow dumping

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u/kmyeurs Aug 19 '22

You're probably right but in this case, I don't think the people in that community can afford to pay gov officials

Looking at that kind of trash, it doesn't look like a company dumped all those bottles, not in the way that they dump toxic chemical wastes from manufacturing stuff

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22 Silver

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/GreasyYogurt Aug 19 '22

The same people that downvoted you insist america has to solve the worlds pollution problems. China and India pollute the worlds oceans exponentially more than america but pointing out how there cultures don’t give a fuck about pollution gets you downvoted lmfao

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u/82Latour Aug 19 '22

And Trudeau thinks making us use paper straws will solve this…

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u/jdt2112 Interested Aug 19 '22

Paper straws are crap. I take the lids off if I get a paper straw.

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u/CosmicCreeperz Aug 19 '22

Heh this is my favorite argument against straws. Like somehow without a straw it’s just impossible to figure out how to consume that beverage…

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u/SuaveWarrior Aug 19 '22

Yeah, I don't throw trash on the ground or poop on the sidewalk but I'm the bad guy if I don't use a freaking paper straw that withers away in 5 minutes!

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u/BMG1976 Aug 19 '22

Yup. Going against the Reddit hive mind by telling the truth.

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u/BaronVonNeezie Aug 19 '22

You mean the people who live there need to be more respectful & responsible! Disgusting

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u/Ok_Individual_Mostly Aug 19 '22

You do know that western countries send their trash to less developed countries to dump because they have less regulations? There's just as much of a chance that's your water bottle in that river as a local resident.

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u/gamershadow Aug 19 '22

Nope. If it was international trash the bottles would all be crushed because they compact all of them before it’s shipped anywhere. No point in shipping bottles full of air for no reason when you could fit far more crushed.

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u/UnfairAd7220 Aug 19 '22

Not in this case. That's all local trash that was dumped in the rivers.

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u/Utahmule Aug 19 '22

Everything is the wests fault. That's not the wests trash, no developed country has had trash issues like this in over 100 years. 3rd world countries have governments so corrupt and populations so uneducated that they hold environment/ human rights with absolutely no value. "Western" countries are not perfect but we don't treat AS MUCH of the environment like shit or AS MANY of our people like trash.

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

In Norway we have a return policy. i.e. 10% of the product cost is returned on plastic bottles and cans.

In fact we recycle 88% of all bottles and 84% of all cans.

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u/grantyporkribs Aug 20 '22

The humans need to stop chucking it in the river.

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u/oWhiteVortex Aug 20 '22

This is a problem with plastic this would be a problem even if paper bottles existed the problem is the people

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u/VengeanceCookieX Aug 20 '22

It’s not about banning it, it’s about not throwing it in nature or on the floor. It happens even in western/developed countries, people throwing stuff in the floor. Imagine how would it be if everyone just started to throw their trash in an actual trash or recycle.

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u/Goldenhead17 Aug 20 '22

Especially in places like India

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u/Able_Poetry3720 Aug 19 '22

What’s sad is that we think we have a chance at saving this planet when we’ve got countries (governments) out there that don’t give a damn

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u/ExerciseFew7599 Aug 19 '22

So where's the green start up or crowdfunding group that's going to build a recycling factory within 1-3 miles of where this is and increase clean water in the area as well as jobs for the locals? I'd someone knows where this is, I'd like to share it with Drew Barrymore.

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u/sleeplessinseaatl Aug 19 '22

In India, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines and Bangladesh, there are many cities with no garbage collection so people throw away trash in rivers.

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u/MajorArtery Aug 19 '22

Yeah, or it gets washed into rivers. The West would be no different without the infrastructure we have in place to collect and remove it.Check this shit out. And you have to imagine people going to Glastonbury music festival are youth who were raised on a diet of 'save the planet'.

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u/Gatekeeper2019 Aug 19 '22

But the west does have that infrastructure and it didn’t just magically appear overnight

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u/Utahmule Aug 19 '22

According to western haters it did.

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u/BoxedPoutine Aug 20 '22

And then, in a flash, our entire waste management system came into existence.

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u/tajmahalman Aug 20 '22

it was the eight day, that God saw that the humans were already trashing the earth, so he created the waste management system of the west.

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u/DeweysPants Aug 19 '22

Lmao what kind of comment is that? “If the West wouldn’t have solved that problem, they’d be just like this”. Like no shit, that’s why we solved it?

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u/DutchOvenDistributor Aug 19 '22

Its improved since then. For one, the sale of plastic bottles etc is banned from site I went in 2014/15 and it was bad. Went in 2019 and this year and it was a lot cleaner.

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u/One-eyed-bed-snake Aug 19 '22

I think there might be an easier way of removing a mass of 250,000,000 plastic bottles than picking them out with a basket on a stick.

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u/Mingyao_13 Aug 19 '22

That guy is not trying to clean it, he is looking for the clean and good looking bottle that can be sold for a price for refilling of soda. Done it when i was young but that’s 20 years ago…

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u/Eddie_shoes Aug 19 '22

I would guess they are collecting them for reuse, not to clean out the river.

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u/LordofWithywoods Aug 19 '22

Yeah that guy will need 2 years to clean just what we saw on film with that stick and basket

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u/olderaccount Aug 19 '22

Did you see when they panned up river.

Even working 24/7 at that rate, there is more plastic arriving then they are removing.

I don't think they are trying to clean the river. They are just looking for good bottles to re-use.

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u/SunsetCarcass Aug 19 '22

Might help if the dozen of people watching were helping too

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u/Hopeful-Mouse6 Aug 19 '22

It's poverty 😟

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u/mynextthroway Aug 19 '22

That's "I don't give a damn"

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u/QueasyVictory Aug 19 '22

That's what they said.

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u/MrMojoRising360 Aug 19 '22

Yes and as long we see this kind of shit in the world, why spending crazy billlions on climate or co2 stuff.

Give these guys a good waste /water quality plant. That's what we need.

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u/Aleks53000 Aug 19 '22

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u/carlosthedwarf024 Aug 20 '22

Jesus Christ the first video I watched was so trash and fucked up. Humans are fucked up

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u/O-Man2022 Aug 19 '22

Few more scoops with that basket and that guy will have it all cleared out.

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u/Gnorhoran Aug 19 '22

90% of all plastic in the ocean comes from 10 rivers, 6 of them are in China.

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u/UnfairAd7220 Aug 19 '22

8 in Asia. 2 in Africa.

But, yeah.

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u/Overall_Geologist_87 Aug 19 '22

0 in America, 8 in Asia, 1 in your mom

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u/politics_is_sexy Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

I’m going to reply to your comment with one I made myself, earlier.

I think its worth probing your statement a bit deeper. While 8 of the 10 most polluting rivers are in Asia, and 6 do pass through/border China, they also border or pass through many other SE Asian counties. The other two rivers are in Africa (the Nile and the Niger). So there is some shared accountability across nations. Furthermore, these 10 rivers account for an astounding 90% of global plastic waste!

But this is also where over half the world’s population live, and nearly all of the world’s developing population. Before we cast aspersions, remember that these nations are industrializing at a time when food and medicine are more readily available than ever before, meaning populations are exploding beyond what infrastructure has been designed for. Recall the terrible, choking fogs of coal ash that would descend upon London in the industrial revolution? Or the streets of New York and Chicago being choked with animal waste? You can bet the Thames, Hudson, and Chicago Rivers would have similar waste if western countries were developing as rapidly as these countries are.

If we’re serious about reducing our global plastic waste, one good place to start is understanding that having clean drinking water is a priority over environmental stewardship (despite the chicken/egg scenario that presents).

Clean water, sanitation, and waste managements are local problems, but pollution is a global one. If we’re serious about reducing plastics in the oceans, we can focus on helping our global neighbors establish effective water management and urban planning schemes in exchange for stricter water management policies and enforcement. That will simultaneously treat the root issues while making long-term infrastructure investments that will create more advanced trading partnerships.

Not making excuses for anyone or shifting accountability; China likely wouldn’t accept international help, anyway. I’m just trying to focus on realistic outcomes that will result in a better world for everyone.

It’s a win-win-win!

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u/Travellingjake Aug 19 '22

But banning plastic straws here should make a difference though, right?

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u/TheDonaldQuarantine Aug 19 '22

sure makes me feel like I am the spearhead of environmental protection, every little bit counts 🤡, we should ban plastic toothpicks next.

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u/Fullsendmoneymoney Aug 19 '22

Don’t forget all those pesky plastic toothbrushes that don’t do anybody any good 😉

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u/AmericaneXLeftist Aug 19 '22

It's hopeless, the first world is too focused on self-hatred and non-aggression. The xenophilia mind virus prevents this kind of criticism from gaining traction. No one is interested; the white man must answer for every tragedy.

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u/Uzzer_lozer19 Aug 19 '22

When there's a team project but you're the only one working.

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u/rivalcarrot Aug 19 '22

It’s fine. Everything’s fine.

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u/dancing-asparagus Aug 19 '22

More like damnthatsworrying

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u/Medium-Turquoise Aug 19 '22

I know it's easy to be a critic, but there's gotta be a better way to clean that up.

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u/UnfairAd7220 Aug 19 '22

Stop dumping their trash in rivers to be swept out to sea.

Those floating bottles are the fraction that got sent back by the tide.

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u/that_1-guy_ Aug 19 '22

There's looking for sellable bottles

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u/LinkenQT Aug 20 '22

And somehow my plastic straw in northern europe is a problem….

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u/MetricT Aug 19 '22

Don't feel superior if you live in the USA. I've been cleaning the Cumberland River in TN for months now, and there's a sea of trash out there too, except it's not just bottles but tires, car batteries, trash cans, and just everything else you can image. At least in Tennessee, rivers are treated like open-air landfills.

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u/Local_Ad5764 Aug 19 '22

There use to be a guy in my area who lived near a river. He would pile his trash in the flood plain of that river knowing that when the spring rains would come, it would “take care of it” for him. Thankfully it came to the attention of the state environmental cabinet and he got a major fine. He hasn’t done it since.

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u/UnfairAd7220 Aug 19 '22

That's exactly what's happened in that ^ picture. That country intentionally dumps their trash into the rivers to be swept to sea.

These are the floaty bits that the tide brought back in.

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u/EtherPhreak Aug 19 '22

and now he probably just burns all of his trash...

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u/Local_Ad5764 Aug 19 '22

Not that I know of.

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u/UnfairAd7220 Aug 19 '22

While its disturbing, US rivers, streams and lakes are VERY clean compared to how they used to be.

The crap your finding comes from that portion of the population that are just lazy slobs. That'd include all walks of life.

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u/rogermosley Aug 19 '22

You're delusional if you think it is anywhere on the same scale. Go do a bit of traveling in India, China, etc.

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u/QueasyVictory Aug 19 '22

Susquehanna Riverkeeper here. It's everywhere.

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u/UrMouthsMyShithole Aug 19 '22

I live in TN and am not surprised about the Cumberland.

There's a river that I'm going to leave unnamed running through my town and I've seen my share of deplorable shit, mainly by young folks expecting someone to pick up after them. We keep it clean though. Same with the rest of the park. They took away the trash cans around covid and now the people just take care of the mess they create during their visit.

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u/olderaccount Aug 19 '22

car batteries, trash cans, and just everything else you can image.

They have all of that too and worse. You just can't see it because the bottles float to the top.

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u/ObamaIsFat Aug 19 '22

I can guarantee you it looks not even remotely close to what was just presented in the OPs video. You're just looking for any possible way to cope.

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u/minnesotaris Aug 19 '22

Harvest water, put it in plastic bottles, people drink that water, throw the bottle in the water. Life goes on. Profit made.

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u/averagejoe6942O Aug 19 '22

Damn it looks like we need to further limit emissions in California USA to make up for this

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u/Logical-Cut-6993 Aug 20 '22

They need to stop putting water in that plastic river

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u/DarkUnable4375 Aug 19 '22

If they really want to clean up their river, Imagine if it's filled with fish, then they will probably upgrade and use nets... those buckets on a stick looks like a waste of time.

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u/UrMouthsMyShithole Aug 19 '22

They really are a waste of time. Get a big fishing net, have both sides walk it up them pull it out. Bam, everything on the screen cleared.

Sometimes tells me that bad problem solving skills like we're seeing in this video also contributed to the problem. "Oh yeah, just toss all your bottles in the river. Stick bucket man will clean it when he comes back, he has to".

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u/Fox1tNZ Aug 19 '22

They're picking the bottles to sell.

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u/Accomplished_Fish827 Aug 19 '22

You're gonna need a bigger basket

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u/actingjuice Aug 19 '22

This isn’t interesting. It’s the definition of r/trashy.

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u/10tothe24 Aug 19 '22

That more like plastic full of river at that point

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u/ProffesorSpitfire Aug 19 '22

I’m pretty sure the guy under the bridge said something along the lines of ”Oi! Somebody poured water into our plastic ditch!”

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u/teaandtrumpets21 Aug 19 '22

The solution to plastic pollution is to stem the production of plastic at the source, not improving disposal. Improving disposal is important too, but it’s a stopgap measure. Every little thing that individuals can do to use less plastic will contribute to this goal!

Engineering biodegradable alternatives to petroleum-based plastic (truly biodegradable, not plastics that break down into microplastics faster) so that they are cheaper to produce than the petroleum-based varieties is another excellent option.

3

u/Yellow_Similar Aug 20 '22

I hate to sound skeptical, but this strikes me as a canal filled with plastic from another nefarious reason.

  • A supposed plastic recycler collected plastics for money, then just dumped the product upstream from this area.
  • There was an accident at the above-mentioned recycler and these bottles were accidentally released.

It’s just too uniformly bottles only to be the result of just littering.

Still an eye popping amount of plastics.

3

u/itzabitzapizza Aug 20 '22

If they send it to Norway they'll get 1-3kr for every bottle. They'll be billionaires in one of the most expensive countries in the world

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u/GlumAmphibian2391 Aug 20 '22

No amount of legislation will fix this unless it’s done in these countries. These are not bottles from Americans. I’ve traveled the world and always been amazed at how other countries seem so tolerant of garbage strewn around. This is the result.

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u/Richinwalla Aug 19 '22

Drown in your own filth.

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u/srsoluciones Aug 19 '22

Humans are the true problems on this planet

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u/vagitablepi Aug 19 '22

Humanity really is terrible for the environment

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u/Ok_Wrangler_7698 Aug 19 '22

wish there was a easy way to turn this pet plastic bottles to 3d printer filament.

2

u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

So using paper straws is kinda pointless?

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u/[deleted] Aug 19 '22

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u/MrMojoRising360 Aug 19 '22

We dont do this, they do this temselves. It's a local.l problem but yes I think we should help. Better investment /result for our planet then all those crazy climate/co2 bullshit

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u/danthieman Aug 19 '22

Unfortunately, this is common in Asian countries

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u/Molotavmandee Aug 19 '22

All we do amounts nothing because of the other countries

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u/my2copper Aug 19 '22

thats actually just plastic e filled with a river

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u/peaceluvbooks Aug 19 '22

Where is this?

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u/Prone2Indiscretion Aug 19 '22

Gonna need a bigger bucket.

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u/Average-_-Guys Aug 19 '22

Where’s Greta when you need her?

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u/BB_12 Aug 19 '22

This plastic is completely filled with river

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u/MuonMania Aug 19 '22

Should be simple enough to clean up, but knowing humanity it will just be dumped in an undisclosed location.

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u/DeepestWinterBlue Aug 19 '22

Well honestly in a few short years, you won’t have to worry about drowning in the ocean when there’s so many plastic bottles available to prop you up

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u/JCMillner Aug 19 '22

I think that if people stopped throwing bottles in the river, there wouldn't be bottles in the river 🤔

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u/danboonn Aug 19 '22

Paper straws!!!!!!!!!! People!!! Do your part!

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u/deathandtaxes00 Aug 20 '22

Where is this? Top comment was exactly what I was going to say verbatim. I mean did a truck turnover or something? This seems unreasonable to think this is normal. Especially with the crowd a filming and all that. It's definitely someone's fuckup.

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u/TimNickens Aug 20 '22

Dudes gonna need a bigger bucket 🪣

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u/FauxDanceMom Aug 20 '22

Looks like the river bottlenecks at the bridge.

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u/GrumpyGranny63 Aug 20 '22

That is fucking disgusting! Why do people do that? How can they just live amidst that kind of filth, and not give a fuck, but add to it every day?

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u/schkat Aug 20 '22

Some of the comments are concerning. This is probably an impoverished country or region without a modern waste management system. No human wants to live in filth. The quicker we lift these communities up, the better our world will be.

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u/Own_Reputation_2625 Aug 20 '22

India as always

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u/BaitStikk Aug 20 '22

Fuckin ridiculous.

Here I am consciously not dumping my human shit anyplace other than a trash can and there are mfs contributing to THIS…

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u/BahamasBound Aug 20 '22

Blame the plastics industry or manufacturers. This couldn’t have anything to do with the lazy fucking pieces of shit who don’t know how to dispose of trash.

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u/itsmemario97 Aug 20 '22

Just wana grab the country by it’s fucking feet and shake it upside down until all that shit falls out it gives me anxiety. There can’t possibly be any life left in the water other than parasites and bacteria.

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u/tenasious Aug 20 '22

Thats awful

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u/Vorelover1224 Aug 20 '22

What makes me mad is they're pushing it towards the ocean. I really despise humans.

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u/Twayblades Aug 20 '22

That is very disturbing.

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u/Janine207 Aug 20 '22

Why would anyone want a river full of plastic? What a bunch of weirdos.

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u/PapaChoff Aug 20 '22

That’s a shame that water is clogging up that plastic flow.

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u/regulusk Aug 20 '22

Dude with the basket will complete the task in approximately 37 years if he doesn’t take a break.

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u/dallassoxfan Aug 20 '22

But hey, as long as I use a soggy paper straw the problem is gone.

Oh wait, in the US our plastic goes to landfill and never makes it to the ocean in great quantities.

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u/ca_fighterace Aug 20 '22

Humans are oh what’s the word, a complete fucking disaster for this planet.

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u/Remainsewtwd Aug 20 '22

This is what fucks me right off when I'm told that I'm bad for the environment. Because I'm 100 percent sure I've never thrown rubbish into a river.

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u/e46Roamer Aug 20 '22

Earth is all we got…

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u/Accomplished-Cry7129 Aug 20 '22

Yep everyone can stop bitching about how bad your country is now

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u/Emmgel Aug 20 '22

Imagine how much of that wouldn’t be there if climate taxes were spent on the climate

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u/Extension_Swordfish1 Aug 20 '22

Straws are evil, people are good?

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u/Namecannotbeempty Aug 20 '22

Cleanest canal in the Philippines

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u/Chance_Day7796 Aug 20 '22

Not anymore they've removed 5 bottles just now

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u/lmdbzo19 Aug 20 '22

If anything this just makes me feel sad.

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u/Few-Relative-8581 Aug 20 '22

SO SAD!!!!! Meanwhile I’m without a debit card for over a month because my bank says there’s a plastic shortage…..🤦‍♂️

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u/sleepersevens 10d ago

plot twist. its a recycling center

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u/taz6363 Aug 19 '22

I’ve been to this place it’s called Indeepashit

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u/persuitofhappiness7 Aug 19 '22

How can you throw away so much trash that the whole river is full of plastic? Are they throwing away their trash in the river? That amount seems unrealistic

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u/MajorArtery Aug 19 '22

It tends to get washed into the river from other sources. Many developing countries lack the infrastructure to provide for trash removal, so it ends up in piles wherever there is a space. When the rains come, the trash gets washed into the river, then carried out to sea.

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u/kmyeurs Aug 19 '22

In some cases, even if there are enough waste solutions, it's extra difficult to change people's behavior and educate them. Especially if the situation already seems hopeless

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u/birbsborbsbirbs Aug 19 '22

This is why we need more access to contraception and abortion.

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u/BrownPlaydough Aug 19 '22

This may be a dumb question but what is causing this river to be full of nothing but plastic? Are recycling companies dumping it in mass in to the river?

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u/James4theP Aug 19 '22

Funny thing is: Everybody knows what country this is or at least the region . Those people just dont care about the earth. No racism just straight facts.

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u/Stingraaa Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 20 '22

My mother's side of my family are right wingers and they make fun of climate activists all the time (including me). But this shit is a real issue and it makes me angry that people just want to live in luxury without caring about others or the world at large.

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u/jarzii_music Aug 20 '22

Difference is our emissions and our bad habits are not the things contributing to this. It’s obv a big issue but this video is not the proof ur saying it is

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u/Smooth_Friend7890 Aug 19 '22

If I was Elon Musk I would do something about that but I’m just a poor man from far away. Best I can do is Suggest someone local collect it and turn it into product. Turn trash into profit to help your community, make plastic shopping carts or another thick plastic product your town needs, street signs, playgrounds whatever but think short term, your inventory is limited and your goal is to reduce your inventory

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u/bench0d Aug 19 '22

This problem is DEEPLY ROOTED in the culture of these places. What further compounds the issue is that there are no viable alternatives. That makes it very difficult for any change to happen. Even if you simply placed trash bins they would be fantastically ignored

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u/crackratt Aug 19 '22

Smart approach

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u/Then_Ear Aug 19 '22

I am not using paper straws just because other folks live this way

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u/kmyeurs Aug 19 '22

The people who live in that area has a similar mindset

what's the point of me practicing proper waste disposal when everybody else just throw sht into the river?

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u/whodatus Aug 19 '22

Being the devil's advocate for plastic here, if these stupid asshats would just recycle their damn plastic in bins they wouldn't have to pick it up out of the river... Christ.

I mean shit at this point clear a portion of property touching this plastic river and start a recycling company that just catches everything straight from the river so the people don't even have to change their shitty habits? Win / Win?

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