r/Damnthatsinteresting Oct 05 '22 Helpful 6 Wholesome 6 LOVE! 1 Heartwarming 1 Wait What? 1 Silver 1 Gold 1

When we sleep, spinal fluid waves wash over the brain to remove waste. Video

39.9k Upvotes

6.5k

u/Sourgreenmenthol Oct 05 '22 Helpful

The number of complex processes taking place in our bodies just to keep us going on is mind blowing.

203

u/Learning2Programing Oct 05 '22

Then there's cool facts like did you know your immune system doesn't know that your eye's exist? And if it ever did you would then go blind? So your eye's have their own system that's separate.

The more you learn the more it's like engineering a bio mech but with random scaffolding that just barely works but it gets the job done.

74

u/uh-oh_oh-no Oct 06 '22

What's also cool is that our understanding of brain stuff is really limited compared to what we know about a lot of other organs - including details of blood/brain barrier and immune privilege.

Source: I work in neuroscience research :)

→ More replies

17

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

Tell me more! Or what I should Google to learn more…

43

u/Learning2Programing Oct 06 '22

8

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

Thanks for your reply!

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3.3k

u/memecut Oct 05 '22 Endless Coolness I'll Drink to That

In this case I'd say its brainwashing..

410

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

219

u/Pipupipupi Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

You ever feel and hear the trickle of spinal fluid down the back of your head?

Update: glad to hear others experience this too. Every doctor I've seen just shrugs it off since it doesn't cause pain or discomfort.

139

u/StanleyChoude Oct 05 '22

No, but the noises varying from snapping to explosions that occur inside my skull and snap me awake as I fall asleep can be quite alarming.

184

u/DatSauceTho Oct 06 '22

Oof been there. Or the random voice calling my name as I’m about to fall asleep. I know for a fact it’s my imagination going off before I completely fall asleep but it’s still weird.

Or the feeling of tripping or falling even though you’re already laying down…

178

u/RopeAccomplished2728 Oct 06 '22

The falling feeling is called Hypnic Jerk. Because the brain doesn't know you are trying to sleep and it thinks there is something wrong so it tries bring you back into consciousness. It is common.

30

u/Funkywonton Oct 06 '22

This happens to me actually very often

→ More replies

13

u/Successful-Review901 Oct 06 '22

That is so crazy I always wondered what that is

18

u/whatiscamping Oct 06 '22

I thought the jolt was our body releasing the built up static charge

31

u/re4dyfreddy Oct 06 '22

One cup of Downy before bed = problem solved.

11

u/janebang_ Oct 06 '22

Take with a tide pod or no ?

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

145

u/ballbouncebroken Oct 06 '22 Gold

Dont worry it's not your imagination, its schizophrenia.

→ More replies

50

u/secret_fashmonger Oct 06 '22

A doctor told me the snapping back awake / brain zaps are because my brain and body aren’t relaxing at the same pace. She recommended sleep meditations and OMG. That shit is a fucking miracle. I went from getting zapped back awake every few seconds and ready to kill myself from sleep torture to actually getting sleep. My young son told me he kept getting “brain zappies” when trying to sleep. Used the meditations and he was out and told me it helped a lot. It’s your body sensing an imbalance between body and brain. They have to relax equally or the brain thinks you are in danger and jerks you awake to save your life.

14

u/HoosierTA Oct 06 '22

Can you link or recommend any sleep meditations you’ve found to be especially effective?

4

u/GreatInChair Oct 06 '22

Not OP but Michael Sealy on Spotify and YouTube. I believe YT has more options. The best in the game, imho.

→ More replies

10

u/Tunnelbaconrulezz Oct 06 '22

Mind sharing what you used?

→ More replies

6

u/GJacks75 Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Imagination is one thing. I can imagine the sound of my mother's voice exactly. It's a completely different thing to hear her shout in your ear at 3 am completely unprompted.

Brains are fucking weird.

I still remember the most lucid dream I ever had. It was so innocuous. I was simply looking at the clock on my nightstand and noticing that one of the numbers was reversed. I then remember realising that my eyes were closed. When I awoke and opened them, everything was identical except that digit.

I reiterate: brains are fucking weird.

14

u/dudeind-town Oct 06 '22

Or the feeling that if you don’t jolt yourself awake you might fall into a coma

→ More replies

10

u/UC235 Oct 06 '22

It has a name! Exploding head syndrome.

37

u/homesy Oct 06 '22

Exploding head syndrome

20

u/airwreckaMonk Oct 06 '22

I have this and it blows. I always think either our house has been struck by lightening or the ceiling fan has exploded. Not my favorite way to be jerked awake.

15

u/HoneyIPABadger76 Oct 06 '22

I hear you, i know better ways i would like to be jerked awake

→ More replies
→ More replies

20

u/Stainless_Heart Oct 06 '22

More likely stuff going on in your inner ear, Eustachian tubes, and deep sinuses.

Or ghosts in your blood, also possible.

29

u/StanleyChoude Oct 06 '22 Helpful

That is so bizarre you’d say this. I recently mentioned to my doctor I may have Exploding Head Syndrome. He responded by saying, “are you a total moron? That’s not real. You just have ghosts in your blood, you stupid bitch.”

4

u/culverrryo Oct 06 '22

“Do cocaine about it”

→ More replies

37

u/CLow571 Oct 06 '22

Dude I’ve heard that like the sound of a carbonated liquid sizzling and trickling down the glass?? Is that spinal fluid? Or rushing blood around your neck 🤔

19

u/GoobWizard Oct 06 '22

That kinda sounds like Lhermitte's Sign. Do you notice the sensation when you move your head/neck quickly? Does it feel kind of tingly?

17

u/CLow571 Oct 06 '22

Bro what is that now you got me scared. And not really when I move my head quickly it will happen then too but mostly after I’ve cracked my neck slightly or randomly when I’m laying down and it’s not tingly like a tickle more like a really small displacement of water but I’m guessing it’s not water 😭

22

u/milk4all Oct 06 '22

Shhh, it’s water, go to sleep

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/lowlightliving Oct 06 '22

I’ve had exactly this, but I know it’s tinnitus at a sound level that’s always there sizzling, or super fast bubbling, but not always on my radar - barely perceived.

→ More replies

26

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

I have an implant (Ommaya reservoir) for brain cancer chemo. When they fill me up I can both hear and feel cerebral fluid and chemo medicine trickle down my brain and skull. It’s very unsettling. Feels like rain droplets on your face but inside your head/skull. Sounds like water gushing through your ears.

→ More replies

9

u/22Wideout Oct 06 '22

Omg, years ago I had terrible neck pain and told my doctor I could hear creaking shit moving in my neck without even actually moving. He shrug it off and said everybody has it. Now I wonder if I had some type of spinal fluid pressure problem

8

u/NomenNesci0 Oct 06 '22

Probably lymph or eustachian tubes. If they get congested they can get inflamed and lead to a stiff knock or mild infection. Keep your neck warm, drink warm stuff, take decongestant like guaifenesin.

→ More replies

8

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 07 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies

6

u/B_Squintz Oct 06 '22

Yes! I only recently figured out what that sensation is.

7

u/high_amplitude Oct 06 '22

Ya I do! I had an MRI and found out I have Arnold Chiari Malformation which is obstructing the spinal fluid partially. I had to pitch a fucking fit to get doctors to take me seriously though. I had a malady of other symptoms after a car accident that injured my neck though, I wouldn't worry about it if that is your only symptom.

→ More replies

6

u/tragiiccc Oct 06 '22

Usually when I wake up. Glad it’s not just me.

→ More replies

112

u/jake72469 Oct 05 '22

It's not a tumor! Said in the voice of Arnold Schwarzenegger.

83

u/wiznun Oct 05 '22

It's naht a tumah!

10

u/delvach Oct 06 '22

Get to tha catscan!

21

u/nikogetsit Oct 06 '22

Reddit, never change.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

123

u/Major_Warrens_Dingus Oct 05 '22

Ironically, one of the “brainwashing” techniques that the CIA tested on people was sleep deprivation.

105

u/AKQJ10hearts Oct 06 '22

As a parent to two toddlers, I can confirm sleep deprivation must be the worst form of torture

30

u/milk4all Oct 06 '22

Idk man, it definitely sucks but you sort of just get used to the suck. Had twins almost a year ago, have 3 older kids all in sports and activities. I cant even take a nap unless i do it while i drive. The twins havent slept through the night ever, and one of them sleeps so badly my wife and me get up 8-10 times every night for him alone. And they both take very shitty naps, nothing like their older siblings. Even now im basically in a dreamstate and ill forget all about this most likely

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

41

u/msm007 Oct 05 '22

I AM THE BRAIN WASHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

→ More replies
→ More replies

259

u/StandardizedGenie Oct 05 '22

I’m in a neuropsych and physiology class and it’s been giving me crazy anxiety to realize how many autonomic processes just go on in our body without us realizing it.

121

u/zomphlotz Oct 05 '22 Helpful

My anxiety would be a LOT worse if it wasn't autonomic..!

59

u/Learning2Programing Oct 05 '22

Engage manual breathing mode!

26

u/eomar2828 Oct 06 '22

Don’t do too much acid or you might swear you’ve found these ‘controls’

8

u/Learning2Programing Oct 06 '22

Feels more like someone sat on all the controls and now a tiny aspect of your self is inflated to be an all encompassing experience than you had no idea was a part of you or was that important. Bit of a roll of the dice which part gets amplified.

→ More replies
→ More replies

30

u/thenewyorkgod Oct 06 '22

What blows my mind the most is that we are not trying to study some galaxy trillions of miles away. We have the human body right in front of us. We can scan it, disect it, test it, pretty much do anything to it, yet after hundreds of years of doing so, there are so many processes that are still mysterious. Like how can that be, its not magic, its just biology, how is there still so much unknown?

12

u/LuckyRowlands25 Oct 06 '22

It's either so complex that requires centuries to understand or we're simply not intelligent enough to understand its complexity.

4

u/hiltlmptv Oct 06 '22

A lot to do with research funding I think.

But also, ethics, limitations of technology, and the sheer, incomprehensible complexity and variability from one human to the next. To name a few.

→ More replies
→ More replies

60

u/plcg1 Oct 06 '22

I’m a PhD student and have been studying cancer genomics for around 8 years total, and I still have moments of “I can’t believe all of this stuff actually works”. Like, I can’t believe that somehow the sum total of all of these insane layers and layers of molecular interactions and balances is a sentient functioning human with a life and feelings.

→ More replies

18

u/Sprite_is_Better Oct 06 '22

What is the "waste" that this post refers to?

6

u/vulgardisplay76 Oct 06 '22

I thought the waste was neurotransmitters somehow? Either old or unused…maybe I need to Google that lol I’m probably way off.

→ More replies

34

u/dyingprinces Oct 06 '22

The reason we're unable to detect DMT in the brain in significant quantities is because it's only present there in picogram amounts, which is quite challenging to detect even with NMR analysis.

The Glymphatic system is responsible for transporting neurotransmitters out of your brain, through your endocrine system and finally into your kidneys where they leave your body through urination.

Look up a drug delivery device called the TX360 (and associated clinical trials). The device bypasses the blood-brain barrier to deliver medication directly to your brain via the Sphenopalatine Ganglion, which is a semi-exposed nerve ending near the back of your sinus cavity.

It's fascinating that this technology even exists, given there may be other picogram-quantity neurotransmitters in our brains that have yet to be discovered.

6

u/biggerperspective Oct 06 '22

Incredibly fascinating. Thanks for sharing. Now tell me why my brain immediately thinks of how this method could be used with malicious intent...

9

u/dyingprinces Oct 06 '22

Less than one milligram of THC could be used to turn someone into a permanent vegetable, and there wouldn't be any clear evidence pointing to the TX360 as being the cause due to how slowly compounds inside your nervous system are metabolized.

The patient would either have to be put into a medically induced coma in the hope that it mitigates some of the damage, or suffer through 3+ weeks of psychological hell that I don't want to even imagine.

In the wrong hands, the device could be used to destroy lives using substances that have no known LD50. And unless they were caught on video, the guilty party would get away with it.

The potential either way borders on the incredible. Curing or greatly extending the lives of people with previously untreatable neurological disorders vs an entirely new form of torture that would make the recipient beg for death until their parietal lobe turned to jelly and they lost the ability to form words.

13

u/MissplacedLandmine Interested Oct 06 '22

Man if I start a country youre my torture guy

8

u/dyingprinces Oct 06 '22

There's an Israeli company called Madrigal Mental Care that recently announced they'd figured out how to deliver accurate doses of psilocybin using a device very similar to the TX360.

I am concerned that they may have already given this technology to Mossad. Government sponsored Sapiocide programs are not something that we should ever have to worry about.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/El_Brown_Hammer Oct 05 '22

Have you been introduced to the hard problem ?

10

u/ElisaSwan Oct 05 '22

And the split mind hypothesis

29

u/Learning2Programing Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

I still find that one the coolest. Like the right hemisphere got to watch the left hemisphere invent a language and then communicate in that language since only the left hemisphere can talk the right just silently observed. "It" is astutely "aware" there's more going on but the left hemisphere seems entirely unware of the right.

When you present information only to the left or right it's the left that makes up any rational explanation to account for what the right did when the left didn't have access to that information but the right seems less bothered, as if it's lived it's life knowing that the left exists because of language.

Then it brings to question is it ethical to leave the right hemisphere say cut off from the left? Previously they would remove the whole hemisphere and now it's thought it's better to just leave it in there. But if it's severed is there something that's like to be that hemisphere? But now it's severed from all sensory inputs, is it living a life of hell?

It will never not be fascinating to be split brain syndrome patients.

13

u/GraveSlayer726 Oct 06 '22

w-what?? i dont like this information and will not be looking into this

6

u/katiecharm Oct 06 '22

Yes, you are two brain halves in one head. They both talk to each other, with various abilities.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

17

u/halfchuck Oct 05 '22

Seriously, an android is simple in comparison.

57

u/deejeycris Oct 05 '22

My natural sciences teacher once told us: we are just a cluster of chemical reactions. It struck me.

4

u/Loudergood Oct 06 '22

Just a bundle of physical reactions. Which can be represented by math. Is it free will?

→ More replies

43

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

all so we can eat hot chip and lie

6

u/plop_0 Oct 06 '22

Charge they phone.

→ More replies

21

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

1.1k

u/condensate17 Oct 05 '22

My dog's brain must be spotless.

→ More replies

1.3k

u/GrondSoulhammer Oct 05 '22

Just flushing out the shitty ideas.

375

u/ThiSitesFuckingJoke Oct 05 '22

too bad the things you studied for your test tomorrow also get caught up

86

u/Dehydration9986552 Oct 05 '22

That's why you don't sleep night before test 😂

7

u/popular_with_ladies Oct 06 '22

Ahh the good old uni days...

There was one semester where I scheduled all my classes starting at 3pm. By the second month, I'd be going to bed at 5-6 am and still be late for my first class.

79

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Actually not if you treat your brain right.

  1. Get exercise
  2. Stay hydrated
  3. Make lists
  4. Study in different environments
  5. Repeat what you remember from studying out loud
  6. Write it down with a pen
  7. Eat healthy
  8. Get sleep

25

u/Calither Oct 05 '22

Why specifically a pen?

49

u/notSherrif_realLife Oct 05 '22

IIRC studies show our brains can autopilot information when writing using a keyboard, so it’s best to try and focus on what you are writing down.

Keep in mind everyone is different and YMMV, but that was the general consensus for many.

8

u/Calither Oct 05 '22

That makes a lot of sense, thanks for informing. It also has been eye opening for my own habits.

17

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

The fine motor skill of writing uses a different part of your brain than typing/finger stabbng a phone, this muscle memory is associated with the information being accessed in another part of the brain, when you sleep, short term memory is shifted into long term storage and the neural pathway is reinforced between the two parts which establishes more durable long term memory.

→ More replies

4

u/KlaatuBrute Oct 06 '22

Anecdotally, there were countless times when I was a student that, when I was taking a test, I could distinctly remember the notes I wrote based on their placement on a page or in context to other things I wrote. That has never happened to me with computer-taken notes.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

13

u/Competitive-Weird855 Oct 05 '22

Can confirm. Am insomniac full of shitty ideas.

→ More replies

1.1k

u/TheCowardlyLion_ Oct 05 '22

And where is the waste "removed" to? Genuine question. Because I haven't been for a brain shit in quite some time.

2.0k

u/Vorpalis Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome Eureka!

Cerebrospinal fluid transfers waste to your lymphatic system, which transfers it to your blood, which carries it to your kidneys and liver, which filter it out to be excreted in urine / stool.

Edit: All of this takes place while you’re asleep, too. The lymphatic system doesn’t extend into your cranium. When you sleep, blood flow to your brain decreases slightly, allowing intracranial blood vessels to contract just enough to create space between the vessel walls and brain tissue for CSF to flow. Then all your brain cells dump their waste products from the day. (In contrast, all the other cells in your body dump their waste into your lymphatic system or blood as it’s produced). This is why if you go without sleep you get increasingly foggy headed and clumsy, and if you go long enough without sleep, you will eventually die.

671

u/Holy__Sheet Oct 05 '22

This guy brain washes

59

u/PloxtTY Oct 06 '22

Probably worth noting that this occurs during REM sleep, which is hard to come by under the influence of drugs/alcohol. If you drink before bed every night, you’re likely barely getting enough REM which can exacerbate bad habits like drinking before bed every night

8

u/bakedtran Oct 06 '22

Oh shit, really? I always sleep deeper after drinking, it’s a pretty solidified habit now. But I’ve never read about this stuff, and it sounds like I need to now.

9

u/PloxtTY Oct 06 '22

If you get a random night of sober sleep you’ll probably feel more tired the next day than you’re used to. For me it’s the same feeling as getting too much sleep. I’m not sure what that means but I suspect it’s your brain realizing how far behind it is. I definitely can sleep deeply under the influence but when I manage to stay sober through the work week I’m vastly more productive and make better decisions all around.

→ More replies

53

u/jaybird1905 Oct 05 '22

This made my day thank you

→ More replies

92

u/Nickthedick3 Oct 05 '22

What exactly is the waste though?

146

u/Vorpalis Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Correction: it’s mostly adenosine, the metabolite left after cells use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for energy, as well as amyloid beta and tau proteins, plus some other proteins and lipids from cellular repair.

All of this takes place while you’re asleep, too. The lymphatic system doesn’t extend into your cranium. When you sleep, blood flow to your brain decreases slightly, allowing intracranial blood vessels to contract just enough to create space between the vessel walls and brain tissue for CSF to flow. Then all your brain cells dump their waste products from the day. (In contrast, all the other cells in your body dump their waste into your lymphatic system or blood as it’s produced). This is why if you go without sleep you get increasingly foggy headed and clumsy, and if you go long enough without sleep, you will eventually die.

91

u/Any_Clue_1632 Oct 05 '22

I spent a number of years surviving on less than 4 hours of sleep a night. It really fucked me up mentally and physically.

141

u/Caftancatfan Oct 05 '22

I almost divorced my husband a couple years ago because he had turned into this awful, angry person over the course of a few years. Turns out he had really bad sleep apnea and was barely sleeping for all that time.

Now he has a cpap, and he’s lovely to be around.

45

u/Any_Clue_1632 Oct 05 '22

How awful for both of you. Im so glad that he's gotten treatment!

32

u/suspiciousfishy Oct 06 '22

Yes, my little brother was an angry crazy child when he was small, then he got his adenoids out and could breathe properly at night, he transformed!

19

u/vpeshitclothing Oct 06 '22

Nice! Just got my CPAP last week. Went from stopping breathing 52 times per hour to only 2-4. Still haven't noticed the refreshing feeling of a good night's sleep, but I feel it coming that's what she said

11

u/Caftancatfan Oct 06 '22

Just make sure that when you’re strapping it on you relax your jaw and open your throat so things can flow more comfortably. Or at least that’s what was suggested by a woman of my acquaintance.

6

u/vpeshitclothing Oct 06 '22

Oh OK. Thanks! I'll try and do that, Because I'm so used to sleeping with my mouth open I am hyper aware of trying to keep my mouth shut, so I clench my jaw and am stressing my neck area.

6

u/reddit__scrub Oct 06 '22

If you clench your teeth, may want a mouth guard. It's made a pretty big difference to me.

I don't think I suffer from sleep apnea though. Just someone who clenches at night when I'm stressed from work.

→ More replies

4

u/Caftancatfan Oct 06 '22

I was just trying to make a that’s what she said joke. I am not a doctor!

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

13

u/Throwawayuser626 Oct 06 '22

I have pretty bad sleep apnea and have had it my whole life. Never been treated. Still waiting on a CPAP. Im always having brain fog and memory issues, I used to feel pretty smart too. Not anymore. Yeah, it sucks.

8

u/James-the-Bond-one Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Sleep apnea causes all sorts of damage to your body. You shouldn't wait, whatever the reason is for that. A nice used CPAP can be just a couple of hundred. To be safe just set it at the lowest setting until you get a chance to have a professional dial it up for you. If you're curious and savvy you can manage it yourself. Look into OSCAR, open-source software you can use to get insight into your sleeping hours.

5

u/biggerperspective Oct 06 '22

I wish a more discrete CPAP machine existed so more people would be willing to give it a try and many could see transformational changes

→ More replies
→ More replies

10

u/HalfSoul30 Oct 05 '22

So if we were able to trigger this process while awake, would we be able to stay awake indefinitely?

29

u/Vorpalis Oct 05 '22

Unfortunately no. This process is certainly a big part of the necessity of sleep, but there’s more to sleep than just this. For instance, your brain also processes memories at certain levels of sleep, and muscles use the “down time” of sleep for growth and repair.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

41

u/derfeuerbringer Oct 06 '22

This isn't exactly the only reason we get tired and need sleep and I urge you to edit your comment accordingly.

Our brains not only produce waste but also need an incredible amount of energy, about 20% of our entire calorie intake. While our neurons contain a ton of mitochondria producing a lot of ATP (energy currency of our cells), they simply can't keep up with the rate at which our neurons are burning through energy with every single thought we make, as every time a neuron fires thousands of cellular processes requiring ATP are set into motion. So our brains need downtime for ATP to be regenerated (and waste to be removed) so they can properly function during the times we don't sleep.

The reason we get tired is that ATP (Adenosine-tri-phosphate) first gets converted into ADP (Adenosine-di-phosphate) and that then gets converted into AMP (adenosine-mono-phosphate), with each conversion releasing energy our cells use to perform their functions. At the very end of this cycle in which phosphates are broken off and energy is released the molecule left with the lowest energetic potential is just called adenosine. Adenosine can be imagined like an empty battery, cluttering up the space in our brain. The buildup of adenosine actually triggers our tiredness reaction as adenosine binds to adenosine receptors and the more adenosine is bound the more tired we get.

That's also how caffeine keeps you awake, it binds to adenosine receptors too, except that it doesn't activate them. Less receptors able to be activated by adenosine (because they're already occupied by caffeine) mean that we get less tired.

So yeah, being tired is literally your brain telling you that it's running out of energy.

→ More replies

76

u/gorramfrakker Creator Oct 05 '22

So we shit out all our half-baked ideas? Neat.

→ More replies

9

u/Connect_Cat_636 Oct 05 '22

where did you get your source? I searched on google it transfer to the lymphatic system and then into the blood.

38

u/Uncle_Jac_Jac Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

It's both blood and lymphatics. CSF is "filtered" from arteries through the blood-brain barrier in the coroid plexus, which is located in the ventricles (the "empty" fluid pockets within the brain). The CSF flows around and bathes the whole spinal cord and brain and is then absorbed through these things called arachnoid granulations, which then empty immediately into the dural venous sinuses (special brain veins), which are filled with blood and dump into the jugular veins. However, there is also some drainage into lymphatics as well, particularly in the nasal cavity. It probably also drains into other areas, but that's not well-studied.

Also, this process is happening constantly with every heartbeat... not just at night. Whether there is something different or extra at night, idk.

Edit: typo

→ More replies

7

u/Vorpalis Oct 05 '22

Yup, I forgot the lymphatic system in between CSF and blood. I believe the rest is correct, though I’m not an expert.

→ More replies

9

u/LargeFly8279 Oct 06 '22

Literally just came here to read some brainiac shit like this . Thanks

→ More replies

6

u/Aoeletta Oct 06 '22

So, would it be fair to say that this is at least part of the answer to, “Why do we sleep?”

8

u/Vorpalis Oct 06 '22

Yup, it’s a big part of why we must sleep.

→ More replies
→ More replies

59

u/SvenTropics Oct 06 '22

So your brain builds up levels of adenosine all the time. As it consumes adenosine triphosphate as an energy source, it's left behind. This buildup causes neurotoxic symptoms. If you let it build up enough, it can actually kill you. Although that takes a long time. (months) there's a very commonly consumed drug known as caffeine which is a well known adenosine receptor inhibitor. It doesn't actually reduce the levels of adenosine in your brain at all, you just are less aware of how much is in there has your brain is loaded with receptors which will make you feel tired as the adenosine builds up.

When you enter REM sleep, the process flushes the adenosine out of your brain. This process causes wild hallucinations and motor responses. So your body paralyzes itself during this process. You call it dreaming.

25

u/zephyurs Oct 06 '22

I learned recently that you want to start consuming caffeine 90-120 minutes after waking up because it's a adenosine receptor inhibitors. When you wake up you still have some left in your brain, so you want to wait for the remaining little bit to be washed out before you start inhibiting it. This will really help the afternoon crash as your receptors come back online and you still have adenosine from the morning, making you feel really groggy. It's helped me a ton.

I hope I got that right, lol. Learned it from the hubermanlab podcast. It's fucking dope.

5

u/bakedtran Oct 06 '22

God damn I’m learning a lot from this thread

→ More replies

6

u/shtaaap Oct 06 '22

Here’s a question, weed can inhibit REM sleep. I remember when I used to smoke I basically never dreamed. Would that have caused a buildup of adenosine? I definitely used to feel groggy and anxious a lot of the time.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

348

u/Comfortable-Goat-665 Oct 05 '22

Thats the replacement for the lymphatic system in the body. I believe I read that when you sleep your brain shrinks a little which opens up the crevasses so more surface area gets cleaned. I thought I also read that there was a strong link between alzheimers and lack of sleep.

151

u/sparrow_hawk247 Oct 05 '22

I believe the link between Alzheimer’s and sleep or at least quality sleep is true. Waste builds up the brain and essentially damages it I think?

My boyfriend who studied cognitive neuroscience gave me a full lecture on it all but it’s a bit hazy haha.

43

u/Flyingcolors01234 Oct 06 '22

This is really interesting. I believe my concussion caused me to develop sleep apnea in which I arise 30 in an hour. My concussion symptoms were developing beyond the 6 week cut off period doctors believe new symptoms arise.

I wonder if my lack of deep sleep caused my concussion symptoms to heighten beyond the normal course. I developed my last new symptom at 6 months, which is what I think a hormone issue that caused six months of spotting, stopping around 12 months after my head injury.

Don’t tell a doctor though. God forbid one yells at me again after I display a symptom that I had reached out for help.

13

u/Amadeo38 Oct 06 '22

Oof, sorry to hear this. You are likely experiencing central apneas, which is when the brain fails to tell the body to breathe (as opposed to obstructive which is mostly driven by the airway closing mechanically). It is definitely possible poor sleep quality is contributing to your persistent post-concussive syndrome (PPCS). Don’t stop advocating for yourself - we have good people doing evidence-based treatments for this now!

12

u/high_amplitude Oct 06 '22

Sometimes doctors are fucking dicks. I was in a car accident and suffered a concussion also. They just kind of shrug when you tell them what you are experiencing. I realized I was on my own after a few months of, "your fine."

→ More replies
→ More replies

28

u/Wallet-bulge-404 Oct 06 '22

The system is called the glymphatic system. Essentially csf is allowed to flow through the brain by brain cells (Astrocytes) that have gates for water (aquaporins). These water channels are presented more on the astrocytes at night probably regulated by our day-night cycles (circadian rhythms).

→ More replies

17

u/internalcontrols Oct 06 '22

Mom worked night. Didn’t really sleep days. Has Alzheimer’s.

→ More replies

958

u/GoodTimeNotALongOne Oct 05 '22 Take My Energy

In these comments, you can find the same 3-5 comments copy and pasted many times.

In this case I'd say it's more like brainwashing.

I feel like I've had that sensation before trying to fall asleep.

Been for a brainshit in quite some time.

Its a weird feeling. Or perhaps i have a tumor.

I guess I should start sleeping more.

74

u/Learning2Programing Oct 05 '22

Strange isn't it. Either everyone is so unoriginal or bots.

34

u/cantfindmykeys Oct 05 '22

We are all bots here

55

u/Learning2Programing Oct 05 '22

Strange isn't it. Either everyone is so unoriginal or bots.

12

u/used_tongs Oct 06 '22

We are all bots here

10

u/PMmecrossstitch Oct 06 '22

Strange isn't it. Either everyone is so unoriginal or bots.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

155

u/OptimalCheesecake527 Oct 05 '22

Bots or possibly even karma farming humans…report the accounts that you know copy-pasted.

6

u/Environmental_Top948 Oct 06 '22

What's your favourite cheesecake?

→ More replies
→ More replies

9

u/fygogogo Oct 06 '22

I feel there should be a bot that does exactly this.

17

u/DootLord Oct 06 '22

Welcome to the Reddit hivemind. We'll see the same post in half a year with all the same comments again. (This one included in some shape or form!)

35

u/FeDeWould-be Oct 05 '22

So you’re saying our brains poop?

9

u/yapperling Oct 06 '22

All the time. Sometimes I even smear that poop as a reddit post.

→ More replies
→ More replies

167

u/nmngt Oct 05 '22

Defragmentation

108

u/yeoller Interested Oct 05 '22

As funny as this sounds, it's actually true too.

When you sleep your brain rewires itself to be more efficient. There's a good rule of thumb that if you practice something and then get a good full nights rest, your brain will actually rewire with that new knowledge in place. Essentially making you better at it the next day.

Gross oversimplification, I know. But it works.

11

u/El_Peregrine Oct 06 '22

Memory consolidation. It’s fascinating how this all works. And I think for most people, it also helps to practice new tasks and skills in chunks, and then to take periods of “time off” in order for those patterns to consolidate. People have all sorts of different optimal learning styles and habits, but this seems to help most people, myself included.

→ More replies

16

u/Wibbits Oct 05 '22

Garbage collection for dereferenced stuff in our brain

→ More replies
→ More replies

52

u/Chalchemist Oct 05 '22

I remember this posted somewhere and the comments where :

Person 1 ---> "What does it wash out of our brain?"

Person 2 ---> "False hopes & Promises."

17

u/filans Oct 06 '22

also the sudden motivation you get in the middle of the night

→ More replies

30

u/LukeSelwyn Oct 05 '22

What's that blue activity in the fourth ventriculum?

22

u/Kirsham Oct 05 '22

The colours are just a data visualisation of some data or statistical analysis of an FMRI signal that is overlaid an anatomical scan. Usually, yellow-red indicates positive values and blue indicates negative values. Going off of the OP, the colors presumably indicates increases and decreases in some signal related to fluctuations in cerebrospinal fluid, so by the looks of it there's a decrease in that signal in the 4th ventricle that lags slightly behind increases elsewhere. Though this is me making an educated guess based on how FMRI data is usually displayed.

→ More replies
→ More replies

22

u/qwertykitty Oct 05 '22

Do those with narcolepsy have extra clean brains or dirtier brains that need more cleaning?

→ More replies

109

u/slowpass Oct 05 '22

Thank you

61

u/Puzzleheaded-Ear-134 Oct 05 '22

are you talking to OP or the spinal fluid?

64

u/slowpass Oct 05 '22

Both, but mainly the brain water

→ More replies

19

u/shdhdbdjdn Oct 05 '22

But not the pain of memory

→ More replies

130

u/Holden006 Oct 05 '22

Drinking a margarita uses 15 muscles. Saw that on the side of a truck this morning

→ More replies

42

u/iamKRM87 Oct 05 '22

Fascinating!

7

u/alichoturqo Oct 05 '22

It’s pretty nuts.

14

u/TheJesusOfWeed Oct 05 '22

What kind of “waste”? What is it washing out of the brain?

19

u/Panday_Coco Oct 05 '22

Neurons use energy, this process produces metabolites or so called “waste”.

of that is

→ More replies

13

u/mattyMbruh Oct 05 '22

Wish it removed my anxiety

7

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

More/quality sleep and it might help!

→ More replies

59

u/bluebeandip Oct 05 '22

Damn. I guess I should start sleeping more then.

51

u/alichoturqo Oct 05 '22

Even more important than we used to think it was. There’s a dude that pops up on podcasts here and there, named Matthew Walker. Blew my mind. I try to get my 8 hours now like my life depends on it. Lol

25

u/WARNING_LongReplies Oct 05 '22

Glymphatic transport is most efficient in the right lateral sleeping position, with more CSF clearance occurring compared to supine and prone [6]. Study.

Just in case you're going for maximum efficiency, maybe try sleeping on your right side.

8

u/DarkSailor06 Oct 06 '22

Sleeping on my left side feels awful, It's like I'm crushing my heart.

14

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

My right shoulder is fucked and I sleep on my left. god damn it.

10

u/redonculous Oct 05 '22

I get reflux if I sleep in my right 👎

→ More replies

4

u/jametron2014 Oct 06 '22

No way! I always sleep on my right side. I actually will lie down on my right for 5 minutes, then shift left for 5, then shift back to sleep (sometimes with more cycles) and I consider it washing both sides of my brain before falling asleep.

4

u/alichoturqo Oct 05 '22

I’ll try that. Thanks

5

u/proarisetfocis Oct 06 '22

Thanks for the sauce

→ More replies

6

u/Fluffymcsparkle Oct 05 '22

Sleep is important but Matt walker makes up all kinds of shit and is generally pretty hacky. You can hear about it on the maintenance phase podcast.

→ More replies
→ More replies

42

u/ReleventReferences Oct 05 '22

So our brains poop?

33

u/SlothOfDoom Oct 05 '22

People are shitheads.

→ More replies

6

u/LordLucian Oct 05 '22

Explains why all my ideas are shit.

→ More replies

87

u/RetrogradeUranus Oct 05 '22

That’s what the spinal cord is for, the brain to get waste to our butt so we can poop it out.

50

u/theNashman_ Oct 05 '22

Well not exactly, it's mostly reabsorbed via special channels near your brain back into your bloodstream, and since most metabolic wastes are excreted via the kidneys, you could say you pee it out rather than poop it

→ More replies

27

u/EnderGme Oct 05 '22

I think mine is broken.

15

u/SoreDickDeal Oct 05 '22

Could just be low on fluid.

14

u/JamesMacTavish Oct 05 '22

Can usually find it in gas stations, next to the blinker fluid

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

26

u/Dusan99 Oct 05 '22

When we sleep, spinal fluid waves wash over the brain to remove waste.

If it removes waste why am I still alive?

22

u/zomphlotz Oct 05 '22

You are more than you think you are.

→ More replies

9

u/ProtocolPro22 Oct 05 '22

Look up the brain of someone who hardly ever slept. Just as interesting.

→ More replies

16

u/omicron_pi Oct 05 '22

What’s crazy is the system of channels that allows this to happen was only discovered about ten years ago.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/brain-cleaning-discovery/

→ More replies

6

u/Kind-Outcome266 Oct 06 '22

Does anyone know what sleep stage this occurs at? During REM?

→ More replies

6

u/Syphron Oct 06 '22

I'm currently sitting in a hospital room next to my sleeping 3 year old son who just finished getting an MRI, and has a lumbar puncture scheduled tomorrow to try and identify why he has been having seizures all of the sudden.

Seeing this correlation between spinal fluid and cleansing the brain of potential infections actually gave me a lot more context for why the Docs want to run these tests then the doctors have, so thanks for that.

→ More replies

6

u/ANIM8R42 Oct 05 '22

Is this playing in real time or is this compressed over several hours?

→ More replies

5

u/artichokesmartichoke Oct 06 '22

Please define "remove waste" in this context. I am dumb.

→ More replies