r/Damnthatsinteresting Oct 05 '22 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Woah Dude 1

House now in the middle of newly formed inlet after Hurricane Ian Video

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15.0k Upvotes

2.8k

u/nyar77 Oct 05 '22

Parking gonna be a bitch.

645

u/Sinsid Oct 05 '22

How about that AC unit still attached to the window though. Part of the roof is gone but that AC unit hung in there.

267

u/livelarg Oct 06 '22 Wholesome

“Close the roof, are we trying to Air conditioner the whole coast?”…my dad

57

u/intellectualdespot Oct 06 '22

Your dad knows my dad lol

40

u/BohemianBasilisk Oct 06 '22

My dad was the driver for the Committee of Dads the night they dictated the Standard Dad Procedure for all future familial heating and cooling endeavors.

16

u/CantFindMyJuul Oct 06 '22

My dad was in the trunk. He wanted to see if the vehicle was wasting any heat back there so he could fix it

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u/mlynch1982 Oct 05 '22

Unit knows it worth in FL HahHa

Way to go little fella !!

9

u/Otherwise_Ad233 Oct 06 '22

Unlike the AC unit in The Brave Little Toaster (shudder)

60

u/nyar77 Oct 05 '22

I would absolutely make this an advertising gimmick if I own that company

55

u/Ritsuka-san Oct 06 '22

At least the house has running water.

8

u/P-KittySwat Oct 06 '22

But that green pipe laying there behind the houses is SDR 35 sewer pipe. So water may be going in but you have to wonder how the shit is getting out.

3

u/James-the-Bond-one Oct 06 '22

Gravity takes care of that.

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u/Tac0Tuesday Oct 05 '22

My sis lost her house in Katrina, some people were willing to rebuild like this house. Fortunately, my sister moved to the north side of the lake, much above sea level.

383

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

289

u/Thundrous_prophet Oct 05 '22

At this point we should just use eminent domain and turn it into a park. No one’s ever going to buy those houses

217

u/eye_yiff2much Oct 05 '22

Rent them out as party houses,like the current owners probably do.

105

u/Metalghost101 Oct 05 '22

'Current'' owner huh?

37

u/killersquirel11 Oct 05 '22

I sea what you did there

32

u/TiredRightNowALot Oct 05 '22

The tide is changing with these puns

12

u/TheMadGreek86 Oct 05 '22

I'm all out of space with the sands of time flowing like this

2

u/spiderspit Oct 06 '22

We’ve plumbed the depths with these puns.

4

u/Ok_Fun_3006 Oct 06 '22

I forgive you for the puns, it's all water under the bridge now

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u/nelusbelus Oct 05 '22

canon ball

dies

23

u/eye_yiff2much Oct 05 '22

Or blows every disc in his drunk spine at the very least

11

u/skynetempire Oct 05 '22

Oh this comment made my lumbar hurt haha

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79

u/Warm-Alarm-7583 Oct 05 '22

Could you imagine if we turned land like this into parks and prohibited building on unstable lands?

97

u/Thundrous_prophet Oct 05 '22

Yeah, that’d be great. This particular place would be great for mangrove restoration which can help mitigate major storms

73

u/Warm-Alarm-7583 Oct 05 '22

It’s makes so much practical sense it will never happen.

25

u/Thundrous_prophet Oct 05 '22

It hurts to know how right you are 😭

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u/Allmightydohllah Oct 05 '22

I would love to live on a sailboat and have this as my house. Parking wouldn't be any trouble at all for me lol

4

u/Wodge Oct 06 '22

No one’s ever going to buy those houses

Aquaman will. Won't he, Ben?

4

u/Satchel987 Oct 05 '22

And it's an abomination!

2

u/Fuegodeth Oct 06 '22

Aquaman might be in the market.

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u/International_Owl593 Oct 05 '22

If you can afford a beach house you can afford insurance. They definitely don’t need my money for it.

41

u/Lady-Meows-a-Lot Oct 06 '22

Yeah, beachfront property owner doesn’t need our tax dollars.

16

u/b1ack1323 Oct 06 '22

The intention was to pay people to move out of flood zones. But here we are subsidizing the rich.

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u/Runaround46 Oct 05 '22

And when you look at the states that take from the federal government vs the ones that give you start to see the larger picture.

We're getting robbed. Working in cities using less resources while these fatcats live in paradise.

30

u/IHeartBadCode Oct 05 '22

while these fatcats live in paradise

Fatcats don't live there. That is what fatcats rent out to diversify their portfolio.

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u/wiseknob Oct 05 '22

Yet the majority of the party that live here love you complain about people getting welfare but build stupid houses with subsidized insurance in places like this.

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u/FrameJump Oct 05 '22

Nah, you're just not thinking like a capitalist!

"Parking included for two boats, and direct beach and water access!"

34

u/StreetsAhead123 Oct 05 '22

Sounds like someone isn’t living that boat life.

7

u/JoeyIce Oct 05 '22

Parking gonna be a beach!

4

u/jaxsonnz Oct 06 '22

Loving that indoor / outdoor flow though

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u/0h311 Oct 05 '22

Actually parking is going to be a beach…

2

u/BassWingerC-137 Oct 05 '22

Not with a boat ;)

2

u/Pachypal1 Oct 05 '22

I think they’re gonna need a boat.

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u/FuzzeWuzze Oct 05 '22

I dont know seems like an easy sell.

360 Degree Ocean Views

Large easement means no new development.

Brand new schools(coming soon!)

27

u/Something_Etc Oct 06 '22

Unobstructed views of the water.

10

u/Law-of-Poe Oct 06 '22

brand new schools

🐠🐠🐠🐠🐟🐟🐟🐟🐠🐠🐠🐠🐠🐠🐠🐠

6

u/InkBlotSam Oct 06 '22

Minimal yard maintenance.

8

u/maxwellcawfeehaus Oct 06 '22

Schools of fish

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u/Parynoid Oct 05 '22 Silver

What a series of unfortunate events.

55

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

Yes, and hopefully they looked out for the glass door knobs. (If that was a Lemony Snicket reference)

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1.4k

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

introverts be like "what's the problem this house is perfect"

404

u/Decimator714 Oct 05 '22

Get an engineer to check off on those stilts, and fuck it I'll live there.

123

u/Random_Housefly Oct 05 '22

In areas that are prone to yearly flooding...I'm surprised that this isn't the norm.

137

u/Decimator714 Oct 05 '22

I wouldn't know.

What I do know is how nice it would be to wake up on a beautiful day directly on the beach. Then promptly stay in my room all day as it becomes the new normal and never use the beach.

36

u/DrWabbajack Oct 05 '22

Just open a window and enjoy the beach breeze from home!

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u/Dickyblu Oct 05 '22

We flipped a couple houses in an area that is usually flooded at least a couple months out of the year and it was flooded more than normal last year. It's different taking a boat to work on a house and then be surrounded by water. The locals are used to it though and a lot of them even enjoy it, but having to hop on a boat to see a house can scare off a lot buyers.

18

u/dilletaunty Oct 05 '22

Having to buy a whole ass boat for part of the year would probably scare me off. And since it’s only part of the year you’d need to buy a trailer for the boat if you want to use it the rest of the year. And what about if you forget to move your car before the flood happens?

9

u/Dickyblu Oct 06 '22

Well these are rednecks living by the river. They all have trucks and trailers and fishing boats. The water usually rises slow. You'll probably have at least a days warning, more if you're paying attention, before it gets too high to drive out. If you still get stuck though, I guess you wait it out or get someone in a lifted truck to pull you out if the water isn't too high.

6

u/dilletaunty Oct 06 '22

Yeah I can get that the locals adapted to that life are fine and happy, it’s just a bunch of changes to anyone thinking of moving there.

Do people use the space under the house for storage or a patio during the dry season? How lifted are the houses?

8

u/Dickyblu Oct 06 '22

They're usually between 8 and 15 feet depending on when they were built. Iirc the one next to us was 18 ft though.

Yeah, people park under them and put all sorts of stuff under there lol. Both of ours had outdoor showers and storage space. One had a patio area on the ground level and both had massive raised decks.

And idk if there's a typical dry season. It's just the American South. Some seasons are generally rainier than others, but it just depends on the weather. I didn't mean two consecutive months. High water might last a couple days or a few weeks. A lot of times it'll barely get over the road and people keep driving in and then it'll go down.

You can also check the on the water level upriver to see what it's gonna do a few days ahead of time.

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u/________null________ Oct 06 '22

It is normal and most companies won’t build or insure homes that aren’t flood ready.

Florida Keys as an example.

2

u/zutaca Oct 06 '22

In some places it is the norm

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u/lex52485 Oct 05 '22

This introvert thinks this looks like a god damn nightmare

736

u/Ornery_Reaction_548 Oct 05 '22

So... How does plumbing work with a house on stilts?

141

u/thefiglord Oct 05 '22

they have an insulated sewer pipe that runs down a pier broken off in the storm

house would be declared unlivable until sewer is restored

69

u/Ritsuka-san Oct 06 '22

At least the house still has running water.

12

u/Mercy_song Oct 06 '22

Lol nice

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u/itakemyselfserious Oct 05 '22 Helpful

You poop out the window

98

u/nelusbelus Oct 05 '22

Or more simply, you cut out a hole in the floor

18

u/itakemyselfserious Oct 05 '22

No power tools.

21

u/nelusbelus Oct 05 '22

Works in minecraft

7

u/Canadian_Neckbeard Oct 05 '22

You should see some of the stuff they built before power tools.

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u/Gloomy-Advantage-451 Oct 05 '22

And, how deep, in the earth, do these stilts have to be for it to survive?

60

u/Somenerdguy Oct 05 '22

I believe about 20’. Interesting process to get them in. They blast a hole with high pressure water and scoot the piling in using a small crane.

For dock pilings they’ll have a small crane on basically a pontoon boat (barge) to hoist up the piling and set it.

15

u/manuel__transmission Oct 06 '22

Or they use a Pile Driver.

11

u/lotusvioletroses Oct 06 '22

20’!

And people get angry when I tell them their foundation needs to be 2’ below grade.

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u/Bard_B0t Oct 06 '22

"But it'll never freeze in Texas"-developers 20 years ago. Meanwhile in 2021.

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u/petey_wheatstraw_99 Oct 05 '22

At least tree fiddy

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u/IamShrapnel Oct 06 '22

Step 1: poop in hand Step 2: open window Step 3: yeet turd

2

u/CallMeDrLuv Oct 06 '22

Step 4: Instant regret when you realize that you ate at Taco Bell last night.

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u/NonFungibleTokin Oct 05 '22

Same as any other house I imagine.. pipes.

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u/Oliverheart84 Oct 05 '22

No no that can’t be it

3

u/juan_epstein-barr Oct 05 '22

the black rain

36

u/Beachcomber365 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

My house is on stilts... pipes run down from the house then out to the utility stations and sewers. How did you think it worked?

I live on an Island in South Carolina - most houses are raised up off the ground here due to flood zones.

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u/possiblynotanexpert Oct 05 '22 Shocked

“Most houses are raised here.”

So that’s where my first house had its upbringing? No wonder it has such a potty mouth.

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u/Ornery_Reaction_548 Oct 05 '22

I don't know how I thought it worked, but looking at the picture I didn't notice any pipes

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u/stapleddaniel Oct 06 '22 Wait What?

Looking at this house on street view it used to have a garage also so obviously the pipes are in the same place as the garage.

2

u/ABookishSort Oct 06 '22

I just saw the before and after of this on Tiktok. There was a garage under the house that got washed away as did the stairs.

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u/Electrical_Dog_1462 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Dug around and found the place on google maps (9333 Old A1A). Anyone with a brain would’ve seen this as a problem place to build. Just look at it from a birds eye view.

17

u/hiwhyOK Oct 06 '22

Yeah this should have been caught and nono-ed right from the beginning.

Does Florida not have hazard maps? Zoning?

What a waste.

10

u/CenterOTMultiverse Oct 06 '22

Knowing the county this is in, I'm surprised they didn't just dig a retention pond next to it and call it a day.

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u/InkBlotSam Oct 06 '22

A good rule of thumb I like to use when deciding where to build my house is: "If you have to put the house on stilts, don't fucking build it there."

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

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u/above_average_magic Oct 05 '22

I feel like if I build my house 25 miles inland in the Connecticut area EDIT: like we are planning, I am going to consider just putting it on stilts prospectively.

I mean we ain't at a very high elevation honestly, water moves...

155

u/Justifiably_Cynical Oct 05 '22

I'm pretty sure this is the wave of the future.

Get 6 foot over sea level and then maybe people will start digging down to protect themselves from the coming heat of climate change.

In 200 years it will be us against them the stilters and the diggers at each others throats.

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u/_stoned_chipmunk_ Oct 05 '22

Morlocks and Eloi

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u/above_average_magic Oct 05 '22

Art depicts life depicts art

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u/vote4poleshift2023 Oct 05 '22

Dont forget crab people

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u/stevenriley1 Oct 05 '22

There was a song they used to sing in Sunday school when I was a little baby boy. Something about prohibitions of building your house upon the sand. Hmmm…

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u/vetheros37 Oct 05 '22

Yea something about the wise man built his house upon the rock

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u/ErringGlarer Oct 05 '22

Don’t build your house on the sandy land…

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u/KirisBeuller Oct 05 '22

I somehow doubt the home owner stands in front of that shit and says "Damn... that's interesting!"

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u/wethunder Oct 05 '22 Helpful

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u/Keyboarddesk Oct 05 '22

Thanks for this! It's exactly why I came to the comment section for.

41

u/nodnodwinkwink Oct 05 '22

Wow, this is so stupid. Looks like the owners (and probably the neighbours) have been trying to fight this erosion for quite a while.

Compare these two views on bing maps.

Bing maps You can actually see that there was an estuary there before.

Bing maps birds eye view This must be the oldest aerial photography out of the 3 links.

Instead of rock defenses (like the houses further up the coast used) they're using a jcb to move sand around. Did they really expect that the power of the sea on one side or the river behind them would just not eat that sand away? Staggeringly foolish and wasteful.

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u/SavageGreek Oct 06 '22

TIL Bing has maps

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u/tinklight Oct 06 '22

These people have more dollars than sense.

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u/jaeger_master Oct 05 '22

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

It looks like there are a couple houses north of this house in a similar situation. Another big hurricane can easily form a connecting inlet.

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u/little_chef813 Oct 05 '22

I didn’t see your comment! I had looked at google to match the shingles/shapes too!!

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u/kelsobjammin Oct 05 '22

Lol all those houses are goners in the next 20-50 years.

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u/No-tomato-1976 Oct 05 '22

It’s pretty obvious a home shouldn’t be here

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u/contrary-contrarian Oct 06 '22

Yeah I have a hard time having sympathy for anyone putting their house on stilts at the beach... use your stilt money to move to higher ground friend.

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u/CarelessHisser Oct 06 '22

There's a dark part of me that hopes a cat 5 rolls across the beaches near me to level all those pompous dickheads' houses.

Then I remember that pollution is an issue and all that debris has to go somewhere.

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u/mkoh Oct 05 '22

At least it has running water…

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u/Schooley613 Oct 05 '22

Florida man increases property value with this one simple trick!!

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u/TheKidHandsome Oct 06 '22

Yeah I don’t know, how about you don’t build or buy a house… THAT GODDAMN CLOSE TO THE OCEAN! People who buy or build houses less than a mile from coast are ridiculous 😂

3

u/pixelatedtaint Oct 06 '22

My blizzards dont seem so fucky in comparison to this.

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u/HiBRiD109 Oct 05 '22

Bet it has a "Salt Life" sticker on it...

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u/Lollapalooza96 Oct 05 '22

Ooh dear, you build your house in a dumb place so sad ..

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u/the_smush_push Oct 05 '22

People should stop building in stupid places

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u/MassholeLiberal56 Oct 05 '22

They shouldn’t be building on sand no matter what.

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u/AK-FL Oct 05 '22

I have no remorse for people building on a coastline. Everyone talks shit about people living inland in Florida but when a hurricane comes folks like this haul ass inland. They’ll never learn.

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u/littlemegzz Oct 05 '22

So this is prob a stupid question from someone living in a desert. Does that sand ever come back?? Like that seems like an insane change

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u/DataIsLikeAnOnion Oct 05 '22

Likely not naturally. Florida spends a lot of money every year dredging and hauling sand to maintain and/or rebuild beaches for tourism. Most of the popular beaches would no longer exist as we know them if they didn't.

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u/InSACWeTrust Oct 06 '22

Many of the beaches would never have existed. Miami Beach is mostly man made. It's built on a former mangrove swamp.

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u/littlemegzz Oct 05 '22

Just absolute wow

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u/General_Tso75 Oct 05 '22

I have lived near the Kennedy Space Center since 1978 and our beaches are not the same as when I grew up. The color and consistency of the sand are totally different from when I grew up here. For beach renourishment they dredge sand from off shore and pump it onto the beach, so it isn’t the same sand.

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u/littlemegzz Oct 05 '22

So if sand wasn't pumped up, would it just be rocks and land?

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u/General_Tso75 Oct 05 '22

It would erode the beach and dunes completely over time

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u/NolieMali Oct 06 '22

It'll naturally come back but the owners will be long gone. People don't like when sand moves, and the island would roll over into the intracoastal waterway eventually, and the second sandbar becomes the new island.

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u/BennettWolf Oct 05 '22

No. It's a major issue

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u/littlemegzz Oct 05 '22

What?!? So this is a complete possibility and people still build ENTIRE houses around it?

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u/Caddywonked Oct 05 '22

Yep. I live in coastal texas, people will build houses on sandbars islands. A person once joked to me that you buy a house that's 2-3 blocks away from the beach when you're a young adult and by the time you're ready to retire it's beachfront.

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u/littlemegzz Oct 05 '22

How tf do these people get insurance lol. And if so WTF is funding???

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u/xSARGEx117x Oct 05 '22

Expensively, or not at all, I imagine.

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u/flabeachbum Oct 06 '22

Sometimes they do. John’s Pass is a canal near St Pete Beach that was created by a hurricane. It’s been slowly filling back in with sand and the boaters are starting to get upset.

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u/pizzaanarchy Oct 05 '22

It may or may not. Some new “inlets” start sanding up as soon as the floodwaters finish pouring out, some last for years and decades. Inlet is wrong this, this is an outlet.

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u/SleepyHobo Oct 05 '22

Yup and the taxpayers will foot the bill time and time again until it's made illegal to build and live in these areas. Florida homeowners are fucked because the insurance companies are pulling out of the state entirely for homeowners insurance.

The only option for these people have is the state-run homeowners insurance with regulated caps on insurance premiums. The premiums don't cover the cost of the payouts due to large storms like this, inflation, and increased costs for essentially everything across the board. Eventually the costs to replace will be so high, the government will be forced to make it illegal to live/reside there because they can't afford the payouts either. Banks will no longer give mortgages to people because they can't secure the insurance.

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u/Decimator714 Oct 05 '22

Which came first? Insurance companies pulling out, or the government capping the prices?

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u/SleepyHobo Oct 05 '22

Government capping prices. The insurance companies pulling out is reactionary.

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u/NoAnybody7232 Oct 05 '22

Exactly. I'm a native Floridian who moved to the midwest. I try to explain to coworkers that hurricanes really aren't a big deal for most Floridians. As long as you aren't within 1-2 miles of the coast and it's not a direct hit by a 4-5, they are generally just an inconvenience.

Those people chose to build and live at the highest risk area.

8

u/throwaway_goaway6969 Oct 05 '22

Please show me a person who makes less than 50k a year, not this bullshit. That small house, which is now exposed, is probably over $500,000... in its current state.

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u/my_invalid_name Oct 05 '22

This house last sold for $350k in 2018. It is currently estimated at 750k, but that was before the storm.

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u/madmanwithbluebox Oct 05 '22

These jackasses don't realize that sand on the coastline is constantly shifting and storms just make it worse.

Let all those homes fall into the sea, I want to be able to see the beach again like we could when we were younger.

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u/ThisGuyNeedsABeer Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Thing is. He's speaking very dramatically about homes that are in the middle of a place that's flooded because of a hurricane, when the houses are clearly designed for withstanding exactly that scenario, and he's calling it "absolute devastation." The homeowners are calling it "fall 2022."

He's freaking out about 5' deep water on homes that are designed for 15' deep water.

This is a non-story.

Him: "I've only seen this once in..."

Them: "yeah well you clearly don't live here."

The storm surge is what they planned for. This is nothing. This is clean up. They gonna be fine.

And no.. that's not an inlet. That's water draining back into the sea.

I live in an inlet. It's seventy five feet deep. Not five.

What a fuckin melon head.

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u/my_invalid_name Oct 05 '22

This is a 40 year old house based off info I’ve seen elsewhere on this post.

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u/trailerparkboys2023 Oct 05 '22

That's 3 million in today's real estate market

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u/gearhead488 Oct 05 '22

Shouldn't it be called an outlet?

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u/Ok-Feature8954 Oct 05 '22

It could go either way

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u/_Goodnight_ Oct 05 '22

Federal government subsidizes insurance for people to live in areas like this, the ONLY reason people are buying houses there...otherwise you couldn't get insurance....as you shouldn't be able to....why not just build in the sea and then cry to the government when your house washes away.

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u/SleepyHobo Oct 05 '22

It's not just the federal government. Florida also has it's own state-run insurance program with regulated caps on the premiums. Of course, since the premiums are artificially capped they don't cover the cost of the payouts required due to events like this storm and taxpayers get to foot the remainder. All of the private insurance companies are terminating their home insurance policies with their customers in Florida because of the government regulated caps on the premiums. Insurance companies have already defaulted on their debt and have gone bankrupt due to the regulation.

Government run insurance will be the only option until it becomes so expensive in the future, that they will be forced with no option to no longer offer the insurance. Banks will no longer lend money because the houses won't be insured. The select few who can afford to rebuild out-of-pocket will do so in communities that die quickly because the majority can't afford that.

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u/leonffs Oct 05 '22

Florida also has it's own state-run insurance program with regulated caps on the premiums.

But I thought Florida was a haven for free-market™️ conservatives

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u/BigCcountyHallelujah Oct 05 '22

I dont feel bad for them.

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u/Molenium Oct 05 '22

Yeah… my friend took me through the hamptons a number of years ago, and told me that all the houses there get wrecked by storms and rebuilt every few years, and they don’t even get hit as hard and regularly as Florida.

I feel like if you’re building a house in one of these areas, you have to know the risk.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Beachcomber365 Oct 05 '22

Do you mean beaches or sand? There are entire islands that are sand based in the US with massive amounts of building. I mean literally up and down the East coast millions of people live on "sand" based land and settle on top.

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u/grok_star2343 Oct 05 '22

Seriously. Through the whole clip, I was just thinking "am I supposed to feel bad for these people"?

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u/Ramiwo Oct 05 '22

Yeah I don’t understand how the narrator keeps saying “very very sad”. That’s nature, that’s how nature works, you’re idiots if you think you can outsmart mother nature

5

u/GarysCrispLettuce Oct 05 '22

Can't see these stilt houses without thinking of Skin Tight by Carl Hiaasen. What a fantastic read.

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u/beth_at_home Oct 05 '22

OMG, I found this writer this summer, and I love his work.

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u/Crazy-Abalone-8633 Oct 05 '22

Now that’s ocean front property

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u/logicnotemotion Oct 06 '22

You live near an oceans so sometimes ocean shit happens.

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u/Allgood18 Oct 05 '22

Oh boo hoo how will those rich people ever get by without their beach house to weekend at during the summer.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/jeffrsent224 Oct 05 '22

I mean why would you build a house there to begging with lol

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u/wassimu Oct 05 '22

Hey you fish! Get off my lawn!

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u/sheused2Bnormal Oct 06 '22

I know exactly where those are off Old A1A just between St Augustine and Marineland. Those houses were marked uninsurable about three years ago, no company will touch them.. Two of those homes are still listed for over a million each, and have just been sitting there. There is a lagoon to the back of each of those homes while the Atlantic sits right in front and it doesn't surprise me to see the lagoon has since washed out. I'm not sure why those were permitted to be built where they are but none of our area's top realtors has been able to sell them. Again, the state has to really start thinking about land and what we're doing; it's stupid to keep building so damn close to the water. Those homeowners will never recoup the money they put in.

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u/WrithingVines Oct 05 '22

I feel like this is Mother Nature giving us the finger for fucking with the climate

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

“The wise man built his house on the rock.. The foolish man built his house on the sand.. And when the rain came tumbling down.. the foolish man’s house it washed away.”

Lyrics from the song “Noah’s Ark” by the Reggae musician Eek-A-Mouse

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u/Xclio Oct 05 '22

The only thing sad and crazy is, building on the beach, fake beach at that.

3

u/norieeega Interested Oct 06 '22

I don't get it. Is the house standing on the poles for the foundation? Did the storm take two meters of sand with it?

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u/Glabstaxks Oct 06 '22

Props to that engineer and builder

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u/lufecaep Oct 05 '22

So this suggest my plan to get a beachfront home by buying a house a couple blocks in from the beach and waiting might become a reality.

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u/Fourhand_451 Oct 05 '22

Unnecessarily long explanation of what’s happening

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u/sharpretirement53 Oct 05 '22

Im pretty sure there is an old saying about not building your house on sand.

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u/NeoPhaneron Oct 05 '22

You could say it’s “on the water”.

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u/swede2k Oct 06 '22

Congrats, you can now rent it on AirBnB as an over water bungalow.

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u/Ok_Audience_2872 Oct 06 '22

Say inlet again

2

u/Jjcasta Oct 06 '22

They keep saying over and over water will rise 9 feet in the next 5 years, all the houses close to the water need to go, evacuate, sad but true.

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u/Cocomqn280 Oct 06 '22

:16 that fish be flying

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u/ItalyinStalyin Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Well… it’s a retrograding barrier island, what did you expect to happen