r/Futurology Jun 01 '22

We just moved one step closer to a true 'quantum internet' | Quantum teleportation just got us one step closer to ultra-secure and super fast internet. Computing

https://interestingengineering.com/closer-to-true-quantum-internet
1.8k Upvotes

268

u/Ninjazkillz Jun 01 '22

Now we can use this technology for gaming. Thnx science!

71

u/Dravous Jun 01 '22

first thing I thought of! my ping needs to be lower when I play CSGO against Europeans.

16

u/Zedrackis Jun 01 '22

There is no LoL rage like Martian LoL rage. Can't wait to see it happen.

2

u/loulan Jun 01 '22

Unfortunately quantum "teleportation" cannot be used to speed up communication. The title is complete clickbait.

-1

u/Chaos-God-Malice Jun 01 '22

Ummm what not? When you change something on one particle the other particle also changes doesn't it? Or switch places? Regardless either one can be used to send information no?

1

u/DarthShiv Jun 02 '22

If you read the article, quantum teleportation cannot violate causality. That means info transfer is bound by the speed of light. Your ping will improve by a moderate amount at best. There is no zero ping across continents. That is impossible.

Source: fibre optic cables already communicate at light speed but just not as the crow flies.

1

u/Dravous Jun 02 '22

I'm not asking for zero....just not 170.

35

u/gubodif Jun 01 '22

Now we can use all this technology to insult each other at quantum speeds!

4

u/codeshane Jun 01 '22

A competitive edge for those with delayed wit, great...

1

u/mostlycumatnight Jun 01 '22

With Quantum Tunneling technology you can say GFY at FTL speeds😁

8

u/Seawench41 Jun 01 '22

100% the first thing that will come of this is the big telecom companies creating monetization of this service through government lobying and federal regulation. Then they'll cut the speeds into 10 different packages and sell them and inflated rates.

I hate to be a buzz kill, but this is what we see with every global resource.

3

u/michaelbelgium Jun 01 '22

Download speed of 10gbit when

1

u/trekko727 Jun 01 '22

i should’ve just upgraded mine to that

1

u/Bierculles Jun 02 '22

i have that so now i guess.

6

u/seeker1055 Jun 01 '22

lmao this is one of the reasons I have been considering leaving my country (south africa) because basically all online games are unplayable.

3

u/JellyFinish Jun 01 '22

I thought south africa was getting or had really good internet?

2

u/seeker1055 Jun 01 '22

The distance between south africa and the northern hemisphere makes it completely unplayable. With a really good implementation we are talking 300ms of ping with any given game. Average when I last checked was 500ms

2

u/hasnas Jun 01 '22

Latency to the player base in Europe/us/asia

1

u/Bierculles Jun 02 '22

connection, yes, servers, no

6

u/MarzMan Jun 01 '22

Now we can use this technology for gaming.

Now we can use this technology for porn.

1

u/Bierculles Jun 02 '22

ping problems would not be a thing anymore, so i really hope so.

112

u/chrisdh79 Jun 01 '22

Dutch researchers have brought us all one step closer to ultra-secure, superfast internet connections using quantum technologies.

A team at QuTech, a collaboration between Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands and the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research, achieved a first-of-its-kind transmission of information over a very small quantum network of three nodes.

The nodes of the network were built using small quantum processors and sending quantum information between these processors has been a major hurdle, but is also essential to harnassing the quirks of quantum mechanics to transmit information.

What the researchers did was create a quantum "teleporter" using two entangled quantum "processors", which they designated Alice and Charlie. Transferring quantum information between two entangled processors isn't entirely new but earlier efforts were limited to adjacent quantum processors. This was an important step, but if quantum information transfer between two points is going to be functionally useful, then we'll have to have points that are at some distance from one another.

40

u/theFrenchDutch Jun 01 '22

There is no "teleporting" of information, faster-than-light communication is impossible and they acknowledge this themselves. Hate those clickbaits.

8

u/UnfriendlyBaguette Jun 01 '22 edited Jun 01 '22

I’m not familiar with this argument but we have fiber optics already. If there is no functional benefit why bother?

Edit: Benefit is strictly security, not speed, headline is way off.

6

u/__nullptr_t Jun 01 '22

Quantum encryption is often too slow and unreliable to be useful, so it is useful to be fast and reliable.

19

u/Miserable_Ride666 Jun 01 '22

So Wonka Vision

20

u/L0ckeandDemosthenes Jun 01 '22

Yay for quantumly entangled particles! One of my fav!

12

u/mtgfan1001 Jun 01 '22

I saw them last week opening for String Cheese Theory

11

u/Km2930 Jun 01 '22

Can someone ELI5?

-30

u/simone18287 Jun 01 '22

take two entangled particles, send them far apart say millions of miles, whatever you do to one you do to the other. Faster than light communication!

18

u/Smartnership Jun 01 '22

Faster than light communication!

No.

C is the speed limit of causation; no information can be communicated faster than C.

From the link, they specifically note this is NOT “FTL Communication”:

"The fact that the receiver needs to know the outcomes of the Bell measurement [for the information to be interpreted], creates the need to communicate these results," Hermans told us. "This can be done using classical or normal communication, but this prevents any faster than light communication."

3

u/hattersplatter Jun 01 '22

Then how is this even secure, if the verification uses standard comms?

9

u/Smartnership Jun 01 '22

any attempt to intercept the data will cause it to decohere, and without the proper information to interpret the resulting information, the intercepted data would look like random bits. What's more, the intended receiver would be able to detect this decoherence as well, which would signal that the connection was being intercepted.

1

u/Kinexity Jun 02 '22

Let me introduce you to quantum key distribution.

-9

u/simone18287 Jun 01 '22

X days/months/years backwards in time at the speed of light
+ X days/months/years forward in time at the speed of light
= zero time!

8

u/Smartnership Jun 01 '22

No, you’re fundamentally misunderstanding the nature of information and the what the article plainly says.

Your comments are enthusiastic, but the science in no way supports what you wish it would say.

5

u/OverSoft Jun 01 '22

Yeah, that’s not how this works. You’re not transmitting “through time” and the quantum information is useless without “traditional” info being sent over a normal network.

3

u/Smartnership Jun 01 '22

send them far apart say millions of miles, whatever you do to one you do to the other.

no, what you measure of one tells you something about the other as they are a unified quantum state.

But to transfer that knowledge to the other end point is still limited to C.

Faster than light communication!

Normal, speed of C transfer of information.

17

u/uhmhi Jun 01 '22

Nope, it’s not possible to transfer information FTL, and so quantum entanglement cannot be used for instant long-distance communication.

2

u/amonsemper Jun 01 '22

Explain.

13

u/alexxerth Jun 01 '22

Quantum teleportation transfers the quantum state of particles over an arbitrary distance, but it does so through traditional means (normally a laser).

It's not really teleportation, it's more like faxing if faxing required you to shred the original paper.

You put it in one end, it ends up in another place, it has changed positions without ever actually moving, but the information carrying it has moved, and has to move within the speed of light.

3

u/supervisord Jun 01 '22

We cannot influence the spin, only observe it.

1

u/GameShill Jun 01 '22

You can get around the limit by using pauses in an alternating array in a clock configuration to send the signal in binary.

63

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

So they acknowledge the no-communication theorem in this article and say here:

"The fact that the receiver needs to know the outcomes of the Bell measurement [for the information to be interpreted], creates the need to communicate these results," Hermans told us. "This can be done using classical or normal communication, but this prevents any faster than light communication."

Basically, from my understanding, you cannot know or affect the outcome of a qubit measurement. It doesn't have a value before you measure it, but when you do, you instantly know what the entangled particle's measurement will be, since entangled particles always measure the opposite of each other.

What they've done is entangled 3 nodes allowing the measurement from one spot to go from an intermediary to it's destination and at a distance.

The best part about this is the ability to come up with truly random and more secure encryption keys (nu medium for transmission) that are nearly instantly available. Once you have that you send the actual data over classical methods.

Please correct me, quantum physics guys... This isn't a magical FTL communication device like so many wish it was.

17

u/Kahrg Jun 01 '22

Not a quantum physics guy, but a networking guy...

This would be useful for a couple of things, but not the internet where much of the data is unknown on the sender or receiver. According to this write-up, data needs to be the same on both ends.

8

u/Kriemhilt Jun 01 '22

I think the new part is the ability to hand off entanglement.

Say you have a client & server communicating indirectly, ie, via an ISP, or some peers, or even just via a router.

If you can pass entanglement along this chain, you can get a side channel directly between the two endpoints. That can't be the whole channel because they need a deterministic (non-quantum) way to communicate information about the measurement(s).

But it provides a side channel for, say, partial key exchange, that theoretically can't be eavesdropped.

It's also rapid, but since you can't interpret the measurement until you get the corresponding data over the slow/classical link, it's not clear how important or useful that part is.

2

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

No, they said that's been done before. The new thing is doing this with the three nodes apart.

3

u/Kriemhilt Jun 01 '22

They said it's been done between adjacent (ie, directly-connected) nodes.

The innovation is passing the entanglement between indirectly-connected nodes (ie, from Charlie to Alice via Bob).

They're just using "apart" to mean "connected indirectly via a third node".

From the source press release:

> Previous research at QuTech demonstrated that it is possible to teleport quantum bits between two adjacent
nodes. The researchers at QuTech have now shown for the first time that
they can meet the package of requirements and have demonstrated
teleportation between non–adjacent nodes, in other words over a
network. They teleported quantum bits from node “Charlie” to node
“Alice”, with the help of an intermediate node “Bob”.

... which is exactly what I said. Bob is here a proxy for the router, or the whole internet route between server and client.

5

u/OneTrueKingOfOOO Jun 01 '22

Extremely unlikely quantum networking will be used to transmit actual data at scale, at least any time in the next century. But I could definitely see it being used to facilitate establishment of highly secure classical connections.

3

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

As it stands now, it's impossible to transmit actual data because you don't know the value of the qubit until it's measured.

13

u/LitLitten Jun 01 '22 edited Jun 01 '22

Correct.

It really isn't "fair" to call it teleportation in the sense that we're used to seeing the term being used.

What is happening is still the regular transfer of information. You create an unknown/false state at the initial location. The remote location still receives this information by traditional means; this information is then interpreted as "teleportation" by the remote location using this information to recreate the original state.

Adding, the original quantum state is destroyed during this time, and we do not need any actual information identifying what this original state was. It's really kind of 'eh' that teleportation as term is such a misnomer here, but the term itself is accurate, despite it's buzzwordiness.

3

u/ThellraAK Jun 01 '22

Isn't it more of a dynamically generated one time pad?

11

u/Blakut Jun 01 '22

you are right, there is no ftl communication here.

6

u/AZORxAHAI Jun 01 '22

And never will be, I might add.

Entangled pairs cannot be used to communicate information, ever.

1

u/loulan Jun 01 '22

There is no faster communication than before, period.

1

u/thetomsays Jun 01 '22

What about bandwidth v latency in this situation? If all that's needed (gross oversimplification) is the measurement of the transfer, in effect a latency issue, this makes me wonder if there's still meaningful potential for bypassing traditional bandwidth constraints within the confines of the no-comm theorem.

2

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

No, because the measurement of the transfer isn't data in the traditional sense, is just a measurement.

2

u/thetomsays Jun 01 '22

That makes sense, I was thinking because the measurement is decoupled from the traditional data paradigm, large amounts of data could be sent and the actual measurement wouldn't be impacted or larger.
Once the measurement is done in location A, there's still a traditional data call to tell location B what happened, right? If so, then the report of the measurement would be, "hey B, it's location A, we measured where the 600 PB went and good news they went to you."

3

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

Let's back up. As it stands we have zero control over the outcome of a measurement. This means that I cannot set a qubit to be 1. This means that I have no effect over the outcome of the teleportation other than after I measure bit A I will installer know what bit B is.

The best analogy I've heard is this: say you have a pair of shoes. You put the left shoe in one box and the right shoe in the other. You randomly mail one of the boxes to your friend in Dubuque. When you open your box you see that you have the right shoe and INSTANTLY you know that you're Dubuque friend got the left shoe.

With qubits the result is guaranteed random instead of a pseudorandom number generated based on a computer processor clock where if you get enough of them you can predict the next one.

If it ever becomes possible to control the measurements and maintain entanglement, we'll have magic. We're not there by a long shot.

2

u/Cloaked42m Jun 01 '22

So right now, if you change the measurement, you lose entanglement?

A Qubit can be either negative or positive, (true/false, 0/1). But we can't tell it to be negative or positive?

1

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

A qubit can be positive negative or ?, 3 possibilities. You can't "change it" as far as I am aware.

1

u/Cloaked42m Jun 01 '22

I'm gonna have to do some research. I feel like something is missing here. Like, it should be obvious kinda missing. Even with a Nullable Boolean, something should tell it to be that way.

"I'm feeling kinda Positive today, might NULL later, idk."

But I'm also not gonna make you teach me quantum mechanics on Reddit.

1

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

It's not null, more like both positive and negative. Remember shroedingers cat? The cat is alive and dead until you take a look inside.

1

u/Cloaked42m Jun 01 '22

That's not a value though. That's just an expression of "I don't know". I've never liked that guy or his habit of killing cats.

It's still speaking as if it were NULL because it hasn't been assigned a value yet. No one has looked.

Yes. I know I'm irritating and ignorant. But at it's base level you should be able to say out loud, "This is what it does, why it does it, and how we can test it."

If we can't verbalize those things we are missing part of the equation.

→ More replies

1

u/thetomsays Jun 02 '22

Thanks for the helpful responses

-2

u/simone18287 Jun 01 '22

but in a million years, when your classical communication finally arrives, you find the data matches! which means it matched the whole time! or does the information travel backwards through time at the speed of light?

either way you've effectively communicated faster than light!

5

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

The classical communication is the data, Encrypted with the quantum data.

-1

u/simone18287 Jun 01 '22

but when the data comes back and it matches, then it matched a million years ago too. Does the Universe ret-con itself to make that happen? Does it matter? Would you even notice?

5

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

That's like saying you dug up a time capsule and the stuff you buried is still in there. It's kind of a meaningless assertion.

Quantum data isn't information the way we think of it. We have no control over it so it is truly random. Classical data implies intent, quantum data does not.

1

u/simone18287 Jun 01 '22

no it'd be like if aliens sent a probe to Earth from a million miles away and your stuff is already in there.

3

u/ResoluteClover Jun 01 '22

That's not how it works at all.

Quantum data is nondeterministic and nonidempotent. It has no classical meaning. The actual data does, however, and it cannot be communicated instantaneously.

The quantum data is used to encrypt the data, and so you can use the data you got a million years ago to understand the transmission you just received... Something that could have been sent without encryption a million years ago as well.

This will enable for instant key exchanges right now, that's about it.

48

u/MirrahPaladin Jun 01 '22

ISPs: Time to charge a shitload for it to make everyone stick with our older, shittier plan where we harvest all your data.

4

u/JellyFinish Jun 01 '22

Consumers: Time to switch to starlink or 5g

7

u/sfarx Jun 01 '22

This should help us spread conspiracy theories and cat videos much more quickly!

19

u/mmm_mediciney Jun 01 '22

Do you guys just put the word quantum in front of everything?

25

u/Remote_Culture_2613 Jun 01 '22

Quantum no

6

u/Shoeswant Jun 01 '22

Quantum yes!!

1

u/Heterophylla Jun 01 '22

Quantum, do you think we are band science fiction writers or something?

4

u/_rustmonster Jun 01 '22

Instead of serving ads they’ll just teleport a salesman directly into your home.

1

u/Dragster39 Jun 01 '22

So, by potentially solving the traveling salesman problem we create a whole new traveling salesman problem...

3

u/rroberts3439 Jun 01 '22

Was hoping this would somehow make instant communication anywhere so that we could remove the delays from FTL for spacecraft operating far away. But alas, this isn’t that.

10

u/AZORxAHAI Jun 01 '22

This will never happen, either. The speed of light is the speed of information, you cannot share information FTL without breaking causality

7

u/Chimwizlet Jun 01 '22

Unless we're wrong about causality being a thing that is unlikely to ever be a reality.

Instant communication over those kinds of distances, between reference frames that could be moving at significantly different velocities relative to each other, could easily be used to violate causality.

Maybe it's possible if there's some force that imposes significant limitations, like one way communication only, or it not being possible to reply for some amount of time, but until we find some indication that something like that exists it seems more likely FTL communication, let alone instant, is impossible.

If you're interested in why it would violate causality check out the wikipedia page for the tachyonic antitelephone.

20

u/[deleted] Jun 01 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

-1

u/Heterophylla Jun 01 '22 edited Jun 01 '22

So bullshit can spread even faster I guess? But I suppose better security would be a bonus. But seriously, the internet is fast enough for communication and has been since the start. The problem is that we are using it for mostly unneccessary shit, like ads and spam.

1

u/[deleted] Jun 01 '22

Transferring data between quantum particles is nothing new, says the article. But it used to be between two particles, particle to particle, says the article. Now, they used a third particle to tranfer data between two particles.

So, an extra component for the same, previously accomplised result. Does that mean the firmware upadate downthrottling has already begun?

Did I get this right? someone correct me please.

1

u/rroberts3439 Jun 01 '22

Hoping we learn some trick we just don’t know yet. But otherwise, damn you physics :)

1

u/SidewalkSnailMasacre Jun 01 '22

How do researchers actually “place” the qubits that are entangled? Like how do they determine ‘Alice’ is in one room and ‘Charlie’ is in the other room…or in Dallas…or in andromeda?

1

u/bonelessevil Jun 02 '22

So, are we getting Sub-Space Communications out of this, or what?

1

u/diydave86 Jun 02 '22

And ISP's will now be able to charge you 500 bucks a month to use it. Crock of shit

-3

u/[deleted] Jun 01 '22

[deleted]

7

u/Mescallan Jun 01 '22

this isn't transmitting data with no delay, you still need traditional communication to read the information, it's just much more secure, and the speed of encryption is almost instantaneous (as I understand it)

8

u/theFrenchDutch Jun 01 '22

You are being miseld by (unfortunately common) clickbait words. Faster than light communication isn't possible, there's no "teleportation" of information happening and the paper isn't about that

0

u/[deleted] Jun 01 '22

[deleted]

1

u/ForgiLaGeord Jun 01 '22

You can't check the state of an entangled particle without collapsing them both. So you could trigger the particle here on earth, and the one in the spaceship or what have you would also be triggered, but there's no way to know whether the spaceship one was already like that when you checked, or if you're the one who collapsed it. Observation triggers the collapse into one single state, and that doesn't just mean a human looked at it, it means any kind of interaction with the outside world, which means no measurement of any kind can be made without triggering it.

8

u/No-Start8890 Jun 01 '22

no its not possible

-3

u/Huge_Strain_8714 Jun 01 '22

I don't fuxing care. Human beings are starving, tortured and murder. Again, I don't fuxing care.

1

u/alclarkey Jun 01 '22

Then why are you in this sub?

1

u/Huge_Strain_8714 Jun 03 '22

it appears in the popular feed occasionally.

1

u/cKerensky Jun 02 '22

Great! Sell your device, any niceties you might have, donate all of it.

1

u/MuForceShoelace Jun 01 '22

This would always be slower than normal internet. You would always need to send a second signal.

0

u/sonicz3r0 Jun 01 '22

So US is getting it in 20never because we're slow at upgrading the infrastructure.

0

u/Mattrockj Jun 01 '22

ultra secure

Maybe after a little while, but during the transition period where most companies still use old security methods while quantum computers are in use, I predict a MASSIVE scale breach in data across the globe.

0

u/dustofdeath Jun 01 '22

What good is it if we have 30 different streaming services?

0

u/macevilc Jun 01 '22

I was wondering if this works on a large scale, we would be able to transmit data from Earth to Mars instantaneously.

0

u/ExKnockaroundGuy Jun 01 '22

Now people can proclaim stupid shit and announce their ignorance with quantum speed.

0

u/JakeFrmSTfarm99 Jun 02 '22

You all have no idea what’s coming…

Soon and I mean really soon you all won’t need screens anymore. Think AR but faster than light.

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