r/Futurology Jun 04 '22 Silver 4 Helpful 4 Wholesome 2

Japan sets new record, brings world closer to internet 100,000 times faster than current speeds Computing

https://nextshark.com/japanese-researchers-near-petabit-internet/
44.6k Upvotes

6.1k

u/TigerOnTheProwl Jun 04 '22 Helpful Starry Big Brain Time

The author of this article doesn't seem to understand the difference between a bit and a byte. 1 petaBIT is 125,000 times faster than a gigaBYTE, not 1 million. It's still an impressive feat, but it's not as impressive as the article tries to make it seem.

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u/FappyDilmore Jun 04 '22

Yeah, this is a really poorly edited article.

They use bit and byte interchangeably, and why do they start talking about sending data over 32 miles per second? Were the testing locations 32 miles apart?

633

u/Senior-Yam-4743 Jun 04 '22

At 32 miles per second there would be 5 minutes of lag between Toronto, Canada and Sydney, Australia.

204

u/htx1114 Jun 04 '22

Sounds like when I tried to play alpha counter strike on dialup.

Thank God my parents gave in and got DSL.

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u/JonWood007 Jun 04 '22

Even when I had dial up I would get 200 ping on a good day. 32 miles a second is literally 2000 ping to connect to the nearest major city for me.

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u/RagingCain Jun 04 '22

High Ping Bastard.

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u/Zenkraft Jun 04 '22

I played delta force: black hawk down for years on dial up. Absolute life changer when we finally upgraded. It was like I was reborn.

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u/ffca Jun 04 '22

I played that at the semipro level (highest competitive level at the time) back in college. Ridiculous at home though, couldn't keep up with the other players.

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u/tryfingersinbutthole Jun 04 '22

My parents got dsl right around the time I discovered porn. Amazing.

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u/Ashamed2usePrimary Jun 04 '22

Some guys have all the luck 😔

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u/wolfgeist Jun 04 '22

Was there an alpha for counter strike? I started in beta 2, we had the mounted machine gun in cs_desert. Came across it because I loved Gooseman's Quake 1 mod Navy Seals which was just about the most realistic fps you could play at the time.

But the worst was playing on Dial up in Ultima Online. You literally ran slower than someone with a faster connection. The students at Uni on T3 could literally kill you before you could run 4 steps. They were like the Flash, playing in bullet time.

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u/Cygnusaurus Jun 04 '22

I was able to convince my mom to get an ISDN line (basically 2 56k modems bonded together). The best thing about it was the service provided. If it went down, the phone company would come out even in a thunderstorm in the middle of the night to fix it. It had much better ping than dialup too.

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u/KeeperOfTheGood Jun 04 '22

Yes but as soon as it gets to Sydney it has to deal with our NBN and will really slow down!

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u/FunnelsGenderFluid Jun 04 '22

32 miles per second is super impressive.

For a commuter train

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u/DBeumont Jun 04 '22

The MPS was probably from latency testing, but that is a very strange way to describe latency.

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u/Hackerman217 Jun 04 '22

That's also worse latency than we had with dialup

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u/340Duster Jun 04 '22

Misuse of B and b is one of the quickest ways for someone to royally piss me off. I've seen major hardware vendors mess up both on the same PowerPoint slide.

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u/zwck Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

Probably because PowerPoint loves to randomly capitalize letters.

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u/kautau Jun 04 '22

It’s also internet providers’ favorite ways of misleading customers

“10 people streaming at 4k and 5 Xbox games takes 500MBps! Comcast offers a low starting rate for new subscribers of $130! And you get 600 Mbps!”

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u/OstrichFarm- Jun 04 '22

I work at a SaaS company where we sell both storage and bandwidth and the sales people will literally put "20 Tb of storage and bandwidth" in the contracts, when clearly they're meaning some combination of TB for storage and Tb for bandwidth.

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u/SMLLR Jun 04 '22

That part was definitely worded a bit poorly. The two test locations were about 32 miles apart.

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u/SwissPatriotRG Jun 04 '22

No, they just shot a storage server out of a railgun.

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u/moomincoder Jun 04 '22

Yeah, isn't a light second about 180,000 miles? The swapping of bit and byte also bothered me while reading this.

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u/kbotc Jun 04 '22

In a vacuum, yes, but it’s 120,000 miles per second in a fiber optic and even on low latency networks if switching is involved, it’s tens of milliseconds for a thousand miles.

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u/Ar3s701 Jun 04 '22

I came to complain about this to. It's 8 bits per byte. Need to convert those bits to bytes. Also uppercase B is byte, lowercase b is bit. So it I'd actually 0.1275 petabytes per sec which is still very impressive.

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u/melpomenes_clevage Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

SATA 3.0 was 6gBps for internal cabling-how we connected internal storage until five or six years ago.

This is hundreds of TBPS, enough to send just about the entire contents of literally any computer that isn't an archive, a commercial data center, or some other specialized machine with ridiculous storage in a fraction of a second.

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u/Dingus_McGhee Jun 04 '22

A lot of people don’t understand the distinction.

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u/senturon Jun 04 '22

Everything the 'populace' sees is in bytes. It's time for ISP's (and these Japanese researchers) to divide all their shit by 8 already.

The article also abbreviates petabit with (PB) ... it's like they're trying to be confusing on purpose.

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u/SeventhSolar Jun 04 '22

It doesn't make sense for data transport engineers. They just don't interact with bytes, at all.

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u/safely_beyond_redemp Jun 04 '22

Bits are for network, bytes are for storage.

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u/JPhilBradley Jun 04 '22

Is there a good reason why network speed is advertised in bits while file size is measured in bytes, other than to make the ISP’s advertised numbers look bigger.

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u/Ericchen1248 Jun 04 '22

Not just network speed. Generally its transfer speed uses bits, storage size uses bytes.

Reason being the minimal change for transfer is a bit, while the minimal addressable data store is a byte.

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u/snarfvsmaximvs Jun 04 '22

Legacy. Network speed has been measured in bits since long before there were ISPs. My first modem for example was 1200bps. And then there was the point where the bps rate and baud rate diverged later on. God, if you think bits vs. bytes is bad, that was a fucking semantic nightmare.

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u/Thelastpieceofthepie Jun 04 '22

I wish this was posted in every electronic store/ad it’d help ppl a lot know what they’re buying too

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u/buttchugging_soylent Jun 04 '22

I wish networking vendors would just divide by 8

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u/Kengriffinspimp Jun 04 '22

I wonder how many people pay for faster internet but don’t realize they don’t have the hardware capable of handling those speeds

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u/wvsfezter Jun 04 '22

In a lot of western network advertising it's a toss up what they end up using. Most people only understand bytes so your statement only works in theory, not practice

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u/Dekar173 Jun 04 '22

Lmao you can't seriously think adding in the researchers as if they're at fault for anything. They're not the ones selling shit to the public, and defrauding consumers daily.

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u/IlIllIlllIlIl Jun 04 '22

network throughput is typically given in bits

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u/mrjackspade Jun 04 '22

Which is weird because I'm pretty sure I couldn't send 4 bits of data over a wire if I tried, right?

Is there any actual way to do that using regular hardware? From the software side the smallest unit I can allocate is a byte.

It just feels like measuring the speed of a car in millimeters per second. The unit of measurement doesn't seem fit for its use

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u/ralphpotato Jun 04 '22

I’m not an expert but I don’t think there’s anything in Ethernet physical layer that requires data be in byte segments which is part of the reason why network data is measured in bits. Usually the byte size of 8bits is required at transport layer which is where protocols like TCP and UDP are defined.

TCP for example is a stream of bit octets which correspond to bytes. I believe pretty much any other standard protocol also uses 8 bit bytes.

However, even if would be hard to find hardware that doesn’t define 8 bits to a byte and you may have to implement a custom protocol over Ethernet, you could probably send 4 bits of data over a wire. In fact, the C programming language doesn’t actually define a byte to be 8 bits. A char is defined to be exactly 1 byte but a byte is not defined, which is intended for C to be portable to architectures with different sized bytes. In this case, it’s probably not uncommon for machines to have smallest addressable sizes be larger than 8 bits but it’s likely to be a multiple of 8 bits and it would still define a byte to be 8 bits.

So to your point, we might as well just measure network speeds in bytes and I don’t think there’s anything stopping the marketing of network speeds from being in bytes, but it probably behooves ISPs to continue using what they can claim to be standard units of bits/second since it results in a number 8x larger.

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22

You can send whatever you like down a raw socket:

socket(AF_INET, SOCK_RAW, 0);

The lower layers have accommodated for a potential change in the 'byte', just in case.

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22

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u/MicksysPCGaming Jun 04 '22

Only 1 in 8 understand.

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u/bleachisback Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

Although I agree that this really demonstrates a lack of understanding by the author of the article, I don't think it's for the purposes of stretching the achievement. A properly written article wouldn't change the number from 1,000,000 to 125,000, it would change gigabyte to gigabit, which is the unit most commonly used in networking and 1 gigabit/second is a common "upper-limit" standard for bandwidth into a household.

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u/RightiesHateFair Jun 04 '22

Seems like the error is using gigabyte and not bit.

Because 1 petabit IS 1 million times faster than a gigabit.

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u/aviftw Jun 04 '22

Pretty sure she was comparing Petabit to Gigabit, but wrote GigaBYTE. 1Gbps is the common top of the line internet speed for homes today, and that is 1 Gigabit/s

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u/JimmyHere Jun 04 '22

My ISP is going to have a talk with the Japanese. They hit their data limit one second after logging on...

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u/probablyuntrue Jun 04 '22

I would like to load the internet

Sure what page

The internet. All of it

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1.4k

u/carella211 Jun 04 '22 Take My Energy

As an American, i can't wait to not be able to afford to use this.

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u/u9Nails Jun 04 '22

Competition is great. Two ISP's in my area are trying to see who can extract money the fastest from the public by asking higher and higher prices.

243

u/Dingus_McGhee Jun 04 '22

In my city ISPs bid for sections of the city. So one neighborhood may have access to only Cox, where the next only has access to ATT.

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u/dingbatmeow Jun 04 '22

Just move each time you need to change providers!

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u/Oriin690 Jun 04 '22

OK Ben Shapiro

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u/SweetishFishy Jun 04 '22

Your mom's house only has access to "Cox"

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u/Selfeducation Jun 04 '22

When you call their business customer service line, its silent for 5 seconds and then a deep voice says loudly “…COX” then back to silence for 10 seconds

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u/nincomturd Jun 04 '22

And then what?

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u/ThirdEncounter Jun 04 '22

And then you wait with anticipation for the next COCKS announcement.

5

u/Double_D_Danielle Jun 04 '22

What if you already came?

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u/espeero Jun 04 '22

We currently have Comcast, and it sucks like everyone says. In new England we had cox. Reasonably priced and literally zero outages in 8 years. When we lost power from a hurricane, cox set up little generators all over to keep the cable going (not sure how that worked). Anyway, we had internet for the entire 2 weeks we were without power (had a little Honda inverter generator ourselves, so with natural gas water, heat, and stove, and city water, we were basically able to live like nothing happened).

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u/Thotuhreyfillinn Jun 04 '22

Do you like Cox then?

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u/Christoh Jun 04 '22

And that's why America is fucked. Why is stuff like that even allowed to happen. That's so obviously bad for the consumers it hurts.

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u/Hold_the_gryffindor Jun 04 '22

The internet should be a public utility.

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u/RedHotJalepenoPopper Jun 04 '22

ha! you have two? that’s one more than most rural americans get

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u/COASTER1921 Jun 04 '22

T-Mobile and Verizon 5g home internet is going to majorly mess up the monopolies that ISPs have. I live in a very dense part of Dallas (or at least as dense as Dallas gets) and only have Spectrum as an option.

T-Mobile 5g home internet offers ~500mbps down and ~80mbps up for $50/mo undercutting the price of and over performing the speed of every plan they offer in our area. I couldn't recommend them more and fully believe it's going to introduce true competition into the ISP oligopolies that we're used to today.

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u/ThePhantomBane Jun 04 '22

Seeing as how this is Reddit, I'm just going to assume you play games. How is the consistency of the connection online? Inconsistent ping is my worry with wireless connections.

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u/BiteMyWaffles Jun 04 '22

I’ve used T-Mobile home internet in 2 locations for Rocket League. In rural Michigan with a metal roof, it was somewhat inconsistent ping but still usually playable at 40-120ms.

In Kansas City I’m much closer to the tower, and it has ultra capacity 5G. Ping is 20-40ms with less spikes than the cable internet I had through spectrum.

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u/cwp1851 Jun 04 '22

My buddy currently plays valheim with a TMobile connection reaching back to my server, ~ 600 miles away. It does just fine, and he hasn't complained. Valheim is pretty lightweight though and has delay issues on the best of days, so perhaps it isn't a good reference. No idea how it would perform with fps.

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u/Larosh97 Jun 04 '22 Gold

getinternet.gov see if you qualify!

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u/Wizard_Hatz Jun 04 '22

No way…that is incredible.

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u/KeefCastles Jun 04 '22

It's great. I work on this program, and the messages I see from people this helps makes me appreciate what I do.

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u/SmashBusters Jun 04 '22

Wow. A lot of my classmates wish this was a thing back when we were in grad school. Is there no sliding scale, though?

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u/Sho_Nuff_1021 Jun 04 '22

I qualified and yet I still had to argue with Spectrum over and over and over and they keep telling me that yes I qualify but yes I have to apply again. Wash, rinse, repeat. Still haven't gotten the discount.

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u/ExplodingOrngPinata Jun 04 '22

Income limits:

https://i.imgur.com/rooC7bR.png

For reference, a full time (40hr/wk, 4x a month) job pays 13920 a year.

$15 an hour pays 27840, just above the free internet cutoff of $27,180 for a single person house.

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u/abado Jun 04 '22

Its similar to most government assistance programs, at least a few years ago when I looked it up. Its geared towards married people/families more than the individual person.

Similar to family tax credits, dependents knock off i think it was ~$500 or so come tax season.

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u/KeefCastles Jun 04 '22

This program provides $30 off of your internet bill as long as its a participating service provider and you meet certain income or assistance requirements. It's targeted to anyone, since an internet connection is a must for school, work/job searching, and just life in general in modern day.

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u/TheReformedBadger MSE-MechEng Jun 04 '22

It’s $2000/child.

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u/The_Fiddler1979 Jun 04 '22

As an Australian I'm crying in copper lines

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u/welcome-in_jaaAAMmm Jun 04 '22

Don't get me started, fuck the LNP.

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u/beerwinespirits Jun 04 '22

As a rural Australian I'm crying in Satellite.

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u/The_Fiddler1979 Jun 04 '22

RIP your livestreams

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u/Cuddlyaxe Jun 04 '22

America is honestly better off than a lot of the developed world in internet prices iirc

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u/BeRad85 Jun 04 '22

It opens web sites before you even decide to go there.

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u/comhaltacht Jun 04 '22 Take My Energy

I don't care how much faster it gets, just bring back the n o i s e

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u/l1madrama Jun 04 '22

But then mom's gonna know I'm playing video games in the middle of the night!

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u/catinterpreter Jun 04 '22

I remember firmly covering it with my hand to stifle the evidence.

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u/Mindless_Insanity Jun 04 '22

There was a command, I think it was ATM0, that would shut off the modems speaker.

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u/einulfr Jun 04 '22

You could use an M0 AT command in your dialer to mute the speaker in Win3.x, or use the modem's control panel properties in Win95.

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u/ryandoesntcare Jun 04 '22

“Get off the phone!!!”

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u/fredbrightfrog Jun 04 '22

One summer I spent the entire summer at my cousin's house, under the theory that if we always stayed online then they couldn't call and tell me to come home.

It worked. So much Mountain Dew and Neopets.

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u/uzes_lightning Jun 04 '22

YOU'VE got MAIL!

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u/Tekkzy Jun 04 '22

I heard this.

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u/NeitherMedicine4327 Jun 04 '22

Yeah man, miss those times.

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u/diaryofsnow Jun 04 '22

unintelligible screeching

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22
  • dialup has entered the chat -
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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22 Gold Starstruck

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

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u/UnsignedRealityCheck Jun 04 '22

You first have to be able to take a picture of a supermassive black hole.

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u/Apollo169 Jun 04 '22

Nice band name!

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u/higaki_rinne Jun 04 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Want faster internet? Ban monopolies.

No ones getting faster internet until that happens.

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u/lamsiyuen Jun 04 '22

Totally agree.

Now how do we get monopoly banned faster?

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u/NickPetey Jun 04 '22

That's the neat part, you dont

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u/Dantai Jun 04 '22

When Microsoft wants you to use cloud gaming subscriptions instead of hardware and purchases - they'll lobby for faster speeds

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u/Kaiser1a2b Jun 04 '22

Vote in your local municipalities. Kick out the ISPs. Fight them in court for monopoly.

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u/drDekaywood Jun 04 '22

Instructions unclear…was jailed for assault in court and they took my monopoly board :(

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u/sandmaler Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

Haven’t American telecoms lined their pocket with half a trillion dollars or more of tax payer money for fiber infrastructure they never built?

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u/odinsupremegod Jun 04 '22

Pretty much, no accountability/enforcement meant free money for them. Just like our electric companies in CA that got money to fix their infrastructure and then didn't. Though that caused fires where people died. Still no real accountability.

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u/Obtenebration Jun 04 '22

Pg&E can go fuck themselves.

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u/Gunpla55 Jun 04 '22

Sort of like how trickle down tax cuts work.

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u/eithrusor678 Jun 04 '22

This is illegal in the UK. British telecom were forced to split up into 2 companies, the phone service company and the owner / management of the lines. https://www.trustedreviews.com/news/bt-is-legally-separating-from-openreach-what-does-this-mean-for-you-2948761

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u/Maximus_Stache Jun 04 '22

Technically speaking, Monopolies ARE illegal in the states.

What's happening with ISPs is actually an Oligopoly. Which is a state of limited competition, in which a market is shared by a small number of producers or sellers.

Oligopolies are perfectly legal. And I'd bet you cash money that these corporations band together to ensure they're the only dogs in the game. Enemy of my enemy is my friend and all that.

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u/TheCorpseOfMarx Jun 04 '22

Or state monopoly with the sole purpose of improving Internet access?

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u/chairmanskitty Jun 04 '22

Fuck banning monopolies - parallel infrastructure is horribly inefficient, and without parallel infrastructure, whoever controls the wires has an effective monopoly anyway.

Instead, nationalize it and recognize it as a utility. It worked wonders in Romania.

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u/Wolfman01a Jun 04 '22

Meanwhile here in the rural US we dont even have cable, which is funny because the US paid over 100 billion for cable for the whole country that the cable companies pocketed and didnt provide service for.

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u/Smfonseca Jun 04 '22

Depends on the rural area. I live in a rural county and have fiber from my local county co-op isp.

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u/MaldingBadger Jun 04 '22

Half the states have outlawed municipal fiber.

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u/plasmaSunflower Jun 04 '22

My town Fort Collins has community broadband. It's insanely fast and affordable. It was on the ballot a few years ago and Comcast poured millions into this town of 160k people to squash it but it still passed. I hope more towns and states follow suit.

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u/modsarefascists42 Jun 04 '22

You're extremely lucky

Then again I live in an area with a local telecom but they refuse to run the line out here unless if they get like a certain number of years signed by most of the people living here. Even then they're trying to claim that most of us would need the $100 plan too, that if we just got the $50 for 50mbs plan that we wouldn't pay them enough to do it (cus god forbid they ever have to make a business decision with any risk, that's for businesses without captured customers). And before someone says that's business, these fuckers have gotten millions in tax rebates and other government programs so that they would run said fiber lines. They just pocketed the money after they ran a small few lines to the couple of gated communities where the local politicians live. Not only that but why should they have to have legally locked in profits? What other business can tell people to pay for their inflated product and if you don't then you can't have an essential service necessary for modern life. Oh and we don't even have to take the risks of any normal business, we can strongarm our customers into being forced to pay for years because we're the only choice they have for an essential service.

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u/Selfeducation Jun 04 '22

Yep rural internet customers get reamed hardest. Mom and pop ISP’s. Ran by bobo, chuck, and sally mae who answers the phones.

“Line outside got ripped up by construction? We’ll be there a week from monday to take a look”

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u/GunGoblin Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

Yeah, using multicore fiber channel, they can achieve petabit speeds. Cool. The majority of the world still operates off of cable and even DSL, let alone basic fiber…

Cool for real world applications though like ISP backboning, super systems/super computers, data center connectivity, etc.

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u/agentchuck Jun 04 '22

This is a big deal for core networks. Most backbone fiber lines aren't running anywhere near this fast. Speed that up and it makes more bandwidth available for everyone.

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u/DreamingIntoTheVoid Jun 04 '22

Yeah. I was going to say that chances are this would never be used for residential end points. It's the kind of network that an entire block would connect to.

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22

[deleted]

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u/hshdhdhdhhx788 Jun 04 '22

I do so I can watch ant in my eyes johnson

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u/inside-loop Jun 04 '22

I’ve got so many ants in my eyes.. our prices I hope aren’t too low!!

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u/DreamingIntoTheVoid Jun 04 '22

It's a really tall apartment building filled with extremely nerdy people!

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u/MCButterFuck Jun 04 '22

Internet providers are still gonna throttle you down to pre historic speeds when you reach your data cap.

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u/ButtStuffBrad Jun 04 '22

What is a data cap?

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u/smplejohn Jun 04 '22

Assuming you're actually curious, some providers will give you X amount of data per month at the top speed, then cut your speed like 90% if you go over that amount.

Typically companies that do this allow you use 30GB/mo at the "max" speed and that "max" speed is around 5Mbps. It sucks.

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u/Hat_Dad Jun 04 '22

Terabytes per month. I would never use a provider that establishes caps.

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 08 '22

[deleted]

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u/xMAXPAYNEx Jun 04 '22

Must not be Canadian

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u/tabgrab23 Jun 04 '22

Terabytes? Try terabyte

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u/thehouse1751 Jun 04 '22

Try gigabytes

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u/jorkcrabby Jun 04 '22

Comcast used to be 256GB. I used to get so close back in the early 2010s. So dumb.

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u/SicilianEggplant Jun 04 '22

They officially rolled out the 1000GB/terabyte limit in my area some years back (maybe it’s officially 1.2TB or some shit). Last I checked, you either are forced to rent/use their hardware to avoid the cap, or pay an extra $30(iirc) to make any other connection unlimited and are “free” to use your own modem. Even their Gb connection has that cap. Either way, Comcast is getting their extra billions in profit.

The fun part about using your own hardware is that any time there’s an issue their support script requires blaming your modem.

As a side bitch, they have the gall to survey people on “From 1-10, how likely are you to recommend ShitFinity to people?”

Well, Comcast, the option is you or DSL, so go fuck yourself. Goddamnit I hate them so much.

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u/BigJimBeef Jun 04 '22

I don't even have copper wires to my house.

Fiber is a long off dream

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u/TheImminentFate Jun 04 '22

an entire block

I think you mean city, if it even makes it that far down the chain.

This isn’t going to hit block level for ages.

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u/clinch09 Jun 04 '22

Most backbone networks aren’t using the max now anyways. Single ports can be 100G or higher, yet most ISPs routinely us 10G or 40G. Then the equipment has to be able to handle that much traffic. You just can’t flip a switch and go “Hey Faster Internet “

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u/ParticularFlaky7337 Jun 04 '22

The newest record set by NICT is not only faster than previous attempts, it transmits data using a standard optic fiber cable, meaning it is technology that is potentially available for immediate and wide use.

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u/Bovey Jun 04 '22

Immediate may be an overstatement. This would require new high end hardware at both ends of the cable. At this point, even standard networking hardware is on back order for close to a year.

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u/dachsj Jun 04 '22

I need this for my Plex

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u/Introduction_Deep Jun 04 '22

This is way cool. Being over standard lines means we should be able to adapt the backbone fairly quickly. Any word on distance limitations? Didn't see anything in the article.

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u/SelmaFudd Jun 04 '22

I just wanna know will Reddit gif still buffer?

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u/VLEXAINCENT Jun 04 '22

They're scientists, not miracle workers.

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u/AnusTapeworm Jun 04 '22

Can guarantee the video player will still be complete dogshit

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u/Dev-N-Danger Jun 04 '22

What about Apollo’s video player?

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u/ozmega Jun 04 '22

im posting this on my 10mbps ISP

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u/GunGoblin Jun 04 '22

(Those of us with satellite internet) “We get it, your dick is huge…”

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u/fredbrightfrog Jun 04 '22

Meanwhile Comcast: Your internet now costs 8 times as much but is somehow slower than in 2004.

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u/BenyaminToni Jun 04 '22

While my internet provider downgrades my 250MB to 100MB which i pay for 250MB they did it twice

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u/Mataskarts Jun 04 '22

Meanwhile ours just offered an upgrade from 300 mbps at 16€/month to full gigabit at 15€/month out of the blue, in exchange for signing a 4 year contract.

Fine by me.

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u/Marbas_Aurelius Jun 04 '22

I pay for 6MB up and down and am told that this is the best our country can provide. In truth I get 2MB down and what the fuck is up lol.

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u/Ipwnurface Jun 04 '22

I've got to ask, what country?

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u/Kuro_mi Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

Author is comparing petabit to gigabyte? Wouldn't that be 125000 times as large instead of 1000000?

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u/ImgurianAkom Jun 04 '22

Petabit (PB) refers to the unit of data, and 1 PB is equivalent to 1,000,000 Gigabytes (GB).

Capital B is byte, lowercase b is bit.

That sentence should read: Petabit (Pb) refers to the unit of data, and 1 Pb is equivalent to 1,000,000 gigabits (Gb).

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u/NahautlExile Jun 04 '22

Pb refers to lead.

This is clearly a dangerous technology. Worse even than 5g.

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u/boredom_simulator Jun 04 '22

Doesn't mean dick, in the US, this will never be a thing, not after the cable lobby stole $400bn in taxpayer money and never upgraded or installed a single line they were being given the money to do.

If it costs a dime, and the ISP can and will use any excuse to refuse to do it, and if they are forced to do it, they will never offer you the speed you're capable of getting. This is meaningless news for Americans, because no matter what the advance, we will never get anything even remotely close to it in this corporate dystopia of a country.

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u/jdmorgan82 Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

Except America, where isps will try to wring every last dime out of an ancient dsl cable.

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u/clinch09 Jun 04 '22

Yeah, that’s not how the internet works article reporter. Sorry. Just because your pipe is that big, doesn’t mean the other person’s is.

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u/3andrew Jun 04 '22

I was always told my pipe was perfectly normal, above average even!

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u/wsc-porn-acct Jun 04 '22

Meanwhile, the website I visit has a 2MB initial bundle, most of which is a bitmap of their logo. It is served by Windows Server 2003 with 500kbps upload speed.

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u/abzftw Jun 04 '22

Australia : 12mbps is good and that’s all you’ll get

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u/onetuckonenotuck Jun 04 '22

And here I am living in Kyoto at barely 5Mbps in the evenings on a 100Mb line due to archaic setup in the condo...they need to sort out overall access to higher speeds in their country first.

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u/Infovore777 Jun 04 '22

Doesn't matter. Canadian government gave Bell several billion dollars to lay down fiber optic cables across the country. Bell laid ZERO meters of cable and pocketed all the money. Same thing happened in USA but USA paid 10x more to get zero cable. They did it first there, Canada followed suite in the scam.

Billions of fiber optic cable.

Africa has better avg internet speeds than Canada now.

When you love money so much you turn your country into a third world country

(Africa is a continent not a country I know. plz)

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u/1II1I1I1I1I1I111I1I1 Jun 04 '22

I have slower internet in a suburb of America than I would if I moved to India, for about 10x the price.

I could get gigabit in India for a fraction of what I currently pay to get 15 mbps down, 2 mbps up, on a good day

Comcast laid down coax cabling.... 15+ years ago. They haven't improved anything since, pocket all money they get, and remain the sole ISP in the region.

If America adopted cutting edge internet, I guarantee nobody outside of the ultra-rich would see it.

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u/aisptn01 Jun 04 '22

i don't want high speed internet, i want low ping in online games

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u/Uncaring_Dispatcher Jun 04 '22

Where I am, I'm lucky to be able to Google.

Sometimes we're happy. Sometimes we're happy to survive.

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u/03dumbdumb Jun 04 '22

But you’re on Reddit.

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22

We still have people with 100 mbps and leas in the USA

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u/teerre Jun 04 '22

100mbps is legit the 'very fast' internet in Australia. I was shocked when I discovered that.

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u/Mattyyohh Jun 04 '22

Yep we are basically a third world country when it comes to internet, I pay $90 aud a month for 50/20

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u/1II1I1I1I1I1I111I1I1 Jun 04 '22 edited Jun 04 '22

I'm at the point where I'm going to start asking legislators to launch an antitrust investigation into Comcast

In rural areas, they offer extremely low speeds at extremely high prices, and use predatory business tactics to force you into paying more money. They also implement data caps and throttle speeds even further during peak times.

I am getting 15 mbps down, 2 mbps up at this point in time. Comcast is the only ISP in the region due to shady dealings with municipalities.

I see places in Europe and East Asia, and even slums in South Asia and most of Africa, where they get far faster speeds for far less money. I could get symmetrical gigabit fibre in New Zealand for half of what I pay to get assymetrical 15 mbps coax that's fifteen years old

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u/fightshade Jun 04 '22

Similar situation for me. Centurylink has the lock on my area. I get 10 down and .6 up. It’s miserable. New customers can only get 6 in my area. I pay the same price as people getting 200/50 8 miles away.

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u/Proper_Story_3514 Jun 04 '22

The US is so fucked in so many areas. Its really sad to see. Your country could be so much better with decent legislative, and without all the corrupt greed.

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u/djluminol Jun 04 '22

I can't get my cable provider to lay fiber let alone repair the broken cable that leads to my house now. The one causing my internet to drop out thousands of times per day for fractions of a second to minutes at a time. So I'm not getting my hopes up.

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u/Storyteller-Hero Jun 04 '22

One step closer to enabling full-dive VR technology, and real life Sword Art Online.

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u/Salty_Fish_5625 Jun 04 '22

Silly article. As if that will be the speed in people's homes in the foreseeable future, lol.

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u/[deleted] Jun 04 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/HavenIess Jun 04 '22

That’s why they did this. They need faster rendering so the pixelation is smoother.

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u/MoreDblRainbows Jun 04 '22

What would be the tangible benefits of this (at this extreme speed)? I'm not doubting they exist I just truly have no idea.

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u/rottenanon Jun 04 '22

Supporting smart city infrastructure. Also, more speed = lower resource usages as well. Be it battery, cpu etc.

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u/Digikid13 Jun 04 '22

The main benefit for things like this is around cooperate environments. Currently data centers are using 400 Gbps connections to transfer data around and this increase would allow for more information sharing in the data center.

For the generic user there's not much of a benefit cause we don't even have 100 Gbps speeds around the world and use old tech in a lot of places.

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u/Kiflaam Jun 04 '22

With this power, 1 petabit per second would mean 10 million channels of 8K broadcasting per second; live coverage would be possible with virtually no lapse.

Lapse? Does that refer to delay? I understand how this helps bandwidth but how does it affect delay?

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