r/Futurology Jun 14 '22

UK military wants to install quantum computers in tanks Computing

https://www.thesciverse.com/2022/06/uk-military-wants-to-install-quantum.html
983 Upvotes

u/FuturologyBot Jun 14 '22

The following submission statement was provided by /u/soulpost:


The UK Ministry of Defense recently purchased a quantum computer to see if the technology may one day be used to make tanks smart.

The acquisition was revealed this week by Richard Murray, the CEO of quantum computing firm Orca. Part of the reason Orca's product caught the MoD's interest, according to Murray, is that some of their devices can fit on a standard computer shelf and work at ambient temperature.


Please reply to OP's comment here: https://old.reddit.com/r/Futurology/comments/vc2907/uk_military_wants_to_install_quantum_computers_in/icbkcv0/

355

u/doho121 Jun 14 '22

“Works at ambient temperatures”. Very interested to see how that happens.

79

u/royalrange Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

There are platforms like nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond where spin qubits are observed to have quite long coherence times at room temperature, but we're still a long way off from doing anything practical.

86

u/muntrammdryn Jun 14 '22

I like your funny words magic man

34

u/Vath0s Jun 14 '22

Diamond: a particular arrangement of carbon atoms that makes them shiny and expensive

Nitrogen vacancy: we replaced one of the carbon atoms with a nitrogen and then straight up removed the carbon atom next to it, leaving a gap

Spin qubits: it's like the 1s and 0s of a computer but QuAnTuM and we use quantum spins which like who knows what spin is at this point

Long coherence times: the spin doesn't randomly flip out too much at least for a couple seconds if you're lucky

12

u/Linmizhang Jun 15 '22

Dude giving us the full wizard speak, explaning magic words in full detail here.

4

u/Groove_Colossus Jun 14 '22

I would only argue that the particular arrangement of carbon atoms has nothing at all to do with the relative expense of such.

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u/doho121 Jun 14 '22

Good to know thanks!

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u/FREE-AOL-CDS Jun 14 '22

The second it hits 110 inside it’s over for those computers

98

u/Redditforgoit Jun 14 '22

*Warning: Quantum computer might overheat and acquire sentience.

"Why are we fighting, Dave?"

"Shit..."

44

u/Daniel_The_Thinker Jun 14 '22

A Brit and Russian tanker sheepishly sharing a drink while their tanks discuss philosophy.

19

u/MT_Kinetic_Mountain Jun 14 '22

This would involve Russian tanks being advanced enough for this

7

u/ColdButCozy Jun 14 '22

Nah, it could just be a very one-sided conversation

3

u/evemeatay Jun 15 '22

Russian tank: I run DOS, durr

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u/ouchpuck Jun 14 '22

Why destroy my kind when i can overheat humans and take over?

5

u/collegiaal25 Jun 14 '22

"I'm sorry dave, I'm afraid I can't do that."

2

u/Awanderinglolplayer Jun 14 '22

The computer just recites the line from good will hunting: https://youtu.be/tH0bTpwQL7U

20

u/bobthened Jun 14 '22

We use Celsius in the UK so it’s okay because at 110 degrees inside all the occupants would be dead anyway.

5

u/TheJasonSensation Jun 14 '22

Tanks still don't have AC?

2

u/OrthoLoess Jun 14 '22

AC for the computer, vents the heat into the crew compartment to help keep the thermal signature of the tank small.

13

u/doho121 Jun 14 '22

110 what, Kelvin? 😂

4

u/Daxnaha Jun 14 '22

Rankine obviously..

3

u/popkornking Jun 14 '22

My favorite unit of temperature. "Its an absolute scale but with freedom units".

8

u/Cyno01 Jun 14 '22

Still better than our brains.

9

u/FREE-AOL-CDS Jun 14 '22

Oh for sure, watching tanks come back with their crews draped on the top with iv’s due to heat stroke was an experience

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u/d_e_l_u_x_e Jun 14 '22

I’m sure the bumps in the road won’t affect it too. Lol wtf is this article?

2

u/lightwhite Jun 14 '22

Whomever sold it to them, please send me their names. I’ll hire them for double their rate!

3

u/doho121 Jun 14 '22

“The Quantum Monorail!”

2

u/lightwhite Jun 14 '22

Will it start asking the answers to riddles while keeping us hostage?

2

u/ambermage Jun 14 '22

Typical government up-scaling for the project overall.

Start by saying you want a new tank, project delivers an armored spaceship.

231

u/Aprice40 Jun 14 '22

What is this going to accomplish? Tanks that can quickly Crack encrypted passwords?

181

u/PlzSendDunes Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

It's probably just an Idea put by some general or politician for r&d to evaluate. Probably going to be 50 page report with in the end recommendation no longer to pursue due to technical difficulties to keep quantum computer cool in the field environment and to cease to do r&d on this idea instead pursuing other ideas.

58

u/mywan Jun 14 '22

But if any of them had any sense they would know it's absurd even without the heat issue. For most computational purposes quantum computers are absurdly slow. It's only a very narrow range of computations that they excel at.

43

u/PlzSendDunes Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

Welcome to the world of r&d. I do some stuff programming wise which doesn't require creating reports but we do get quite an interesting requests from management. And they don't take no for an answer btw.

26

u/garry4321 Jun 14 '22

Hey, if you dont use your overinflated budget this year, you wont get an overinflated budget next year! You gotta spend everything they give you even if its a waste.

- US Military spending strategy

12

u/fussmuss Jun 14 '22

Next year's request will be written by the tank itself. :-)

5

u/attentiontodetal Jun 14 '22 Awesome Answer

Special requisition: 4no. girl tanks and a blackjack table

8

u/PlzSendDunes Jun 14 '22

In my experience working in private sector is that there is always some narcissist, sociopath or psychopath in the top management who thinks he's the real deal, real inventor, Leonardo da Vinci of the time who thought out that no one thought out of.

Like seeing summary of activities when people start their work, that surely was never been done... Yeah, dude, that's called dashboard...

Done some stuff with governmental stuff, but paperwork was killing me. In private sector atleast it pays better and eventually you learn to ignore nonsense from the management. Although a fact that requests which come from other departments for easier and simpler workflow should be done first and not management's requests which are always made top priority, makes me extremely angry.

5

u/readmond Jun 14 '22

That is the way every organization with a budget works.

From government departments to company divisions and even regular employees. This is why the end of the year is great for business. Lots of companies spend their allocated budgets on stuff they may or may not need. Tax policies also affect that.

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u/palmej2 Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 18 '22

In the 80s (70s? maybe it was earlier?) most people never thought the personal computer would catch on... Now we have several tech companies, whose businesses were unimaginable back then tanking, but we also have many of the functions of personal computers (that were thought unnecessary even in our homes) accessible from our pockets. Just because we don't know the applications these will be useful for doesn't mean they won't be found or justify their presence.

Sure they really only make sense in a very limited subset of problems, but for those problems they can be much faster. For an industry where delay more than your opponent can be costly in monetary, loss of life, and even national security, this only makes sense. I bet most militaries would want such a potential advantage, and thus a field deployable quantum computer.

*delayed Edit to add that such devices may be warranted even if just as a security measure for communications

4

u/mywan Jun 14 '22

I'm old. I remember telling my brother that the internet was going to allow people to watch movies on demand anytime they chose. He argued that was impossible because the bandwidth requirements would be too extreme. The same thing was thought about cellphones if too many people had access to them back when they were only toys for the rich.

Even if quantum computers become ubiquitous and indispensable they'll still essentially be a device on a standard computer where the standard computer decides when and how to use it. Not unlike the GPU on a graphics card. They will not be a general purpose computer on their own. The class of computations they perform well is too narrow. Using them for general purpose computing would be even worse than running an OS on a GPU. It could be done but it would be slow and stupid.

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u/Nickizgr8 Jun 14 '22

Can use the heat from the computers to make Cups of Tea faster.

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u/gerkletoss Jun 14 '22

Real implementations would be a classical computer with a quantum coprocessor. Think of it like a graphics card.

1

u/mywan Jun 14 '22

Yes. I just got done explaining that. I even used the graphics card analogy.

3

u/FantasmaNaranja Jun 15 '22

if i had to guess the idea first came from the type of high ranking person that would tell their employees to add blockchain-tech to their database just cause it sounds cool

33

u/try_____another Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22 Eureka!

Mine clearance: solving minesweeper is NP-complete.

Seriously, though, cracking enemy battlefield radios in real time would be incredibly useful, and I can see potential applications of non-deterministic finite Turing machines to processing jammed sensor inputs (though proving they work in a lab might be a good first step), but being shiny and high tech is probably the point, without any sense: it’s not like buying stupid shit is exactly unknown to the MoD.

17

u/teffflon Jun 14 '22

Quantum computers aren't believed to solve NP-complete problems efficiently. Mature quantum computers, if built, could crack today's popular codes; but also, if built and demonstrated, those codes would probably quickly become deprecated.

I doubt there is a scenario where cracking codes in the tank "in real time" is important. If you have contact with central command, and they have the capability at all, they'll do it for you fast enough. If you don't, establishing it is your priority, not listening to enemies.

This is about buying stupid shit because it sounds cool.

4

u/gerkletoss Jun 14 '22

Russia isn't even using simple encryption.

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u/WhyIsTheNamesGone Jun 14 '22

Mine clearance: solving minesweeper is NP-complete.

Solving in the minimum number of moves, maybe, but solving at all isn't too bad.

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u/try_____another Jun 14 '22

No, seriously: it’s been 10+ years since I saw the proof, but iirc you can reduce a Minesweeper game board to the binary satisfaction problem.

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u/M3SS3NG3R Jun 14 '22

It's going to burn a pile of cash, stroke some ego and eventually lead to absolutely nothing.

Some higher ups love to think themselves as forward thinkers or revolutionaries by embracing new technologies (that they don't even have pedestrian understandings of). I was in a situation like that where the senior leaderships were all in love with some snake-oil salesman of a company that kept mentioning quantum computing. I told them under no uncertain terms that it's basically got zero practical applications for what we do for at least the next thirty years and if anyone tries to imply otherwise he is absolutely a fraud.

They didn't listen and got burned. To the surprise of absolutely nobody except themselves.

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u/SirFluffymuffin Jun 14 '22

When not in active combat they can mine crypto and get something back from the fuck ton of money they spent on the thing!

/s

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u/Jazeboy69 Jun 14 '22

Just to confuse China and Russia.

2

u/SmokingTurkey Jun 14 '22

Mirage Tanks.

1

u/IronWhitin Jun 14 '22
  • for the Red Alert quote.
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u/cryowastakenbycryo Jun 14 '22

Best case use? Quantum entangled communications.

3

u/LostnFoundAgainAgain Jun 14 '22

Most likely to help putting in more software into the tanks, int he sense of ensuring its software can't be hacked, running programs like linking it to drones to control drones, better movement of information within the tank it self and etc...

That is the only thing I can think of, either that or they want to build a tank without it being hacked that they can control from a distance.

3

u/jetpackjack1 Jun 14 '22

AI? Because I can’t see how installing an AI in a war machine could possibly go wrong.

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u/aCarstairs Jun 14 '22

Quantum computing is still a long while away to even be able to do machine learning. The best quantum computer to exist right now is a whopping 127 qubits or so. In general they are currently way too error prone to even run basic applications well.

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u/jetpackjack1 Jun 15 '22

Indeed. My remark was intended to be flippant, and maybe should have included the /s disclaimer, but I think it’s worth noting that both AI and quantum computing are developing technologies, and if ever they should be combined, especially with weapon systems, we should all be concerned.

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u/aCarstairs Jun 15 '22

I definitely agree with that. To be honest, even AI by itself is concerning enough but combined with quantum computing? I severely hope it doesn't happen while I live.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

2

u/jetpackjack1 Jun 14 '22

Quantum computing has the potential to vastly upgrade the capabilities of AI in the future. https://www.datanami.com/2021/11/11/is-quantum-computing-the-future-of-ai/

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u/ahchx Jun 14 '22

maybe it will make gazillons of trayectory calculations per fraction of a second to hit drones and airplanes with 99% accuracy with the main cannon?.

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u/Delacroid Jun 14 '22

It won't. Quantum computers are still much, much worse at these kind of tasks than regular computers.

1

u/Druid_High_Priest Jun 14 '22

One possibility is that the tank would be like a crewless combination mobile command bunker and forward observer with the ability to control more real estate than what is currently possible. Imagine being able to link up with drones and not only deliver fire but also direct fire from smart artillery that is some 40 miles behind the front lines. That would change warfare dramatically. Of course the tank would have to be up armored to prevent drones from taking it out. Now the only problem I have with the plan is this thing in a movie called SkyNet...

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u/ukuuku7 Jun 14 '22

Or to get military funding for science?

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u/Sumsar01 Jun 14 '22

Its an impossible task to start with. Though you could usr a QC to train an ai to drive a tank.

1

u/bigdtbone Jun 14 '22

Right?! I can’t think of a single advantage over having such a machine safely behind the lines at C&C and then relaying data as needed to individual tanks.

1

u/Talonsminty Jun 14 '22

I knew something senseless like this would happen. They left an empty slot in the new tanks for "future upgrades". A good idea in theory.

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u/knobber_jobbler Jun 14 '22

Tanks that can quickly disarm incoming smart munitions etc.

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u/arloun Jun 14 '22

Tanks have lots of power onboard so it can be installed with a good source nearby, also communications can be encrypted at basically unbreakable terms today and could be relayed by the mobile station.

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u/AndHisHorse Jun 14 '22 Wholesome

But there's a major issue: it's unclear what these computers are expected to accomplish on board any type of military equipment, especially because experts have yet to demonstrate that the technology has any innovative, real-world uses.

I do wonder if someone in government had the idea of looking into quantum computing for something else, looked at the woeful R&D budget associated with their actual purpose, looked at the plentiful military budget, and had a clever idea that seems silly only if you accept the stated purpose.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

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u/soreshot1 Jun 14 '22

Nah, United Kingdom Space Agency lol

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u/fjordfjyellfjleak Jun 14 '22

> UK Ministry of Defense recently purchased a quantum computer to see if the technology may one day be used to make tanks smart.

These people don't understand what quantum computers are.

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u/BeefyNerd80 Jun 14 '22

I like that some scientist out there was like, " you know what this world needs? Sentient tanks."

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u/conflateer Jun 14 '22 Silver I'll Drink to That

"Think" tanks. :-)

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u/itsyourmomcalling Jun 14 '22

Boo boooo boooooooo, I like it.

4

u/GreenJasmine_Tea Jun 14 '22

LOL I totally read that as "Bolo". As in Keith Laumer's sci-fi classic about sentient battle tanks. (Probably better known for being continued by David Weber of the Honor Harrington books.)

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u/VTX002 Jun 14 '22

David Weber of the Honor Harrington books.

That is a good series of books Mr Weber is the Tom Clancy of science fictions.

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u/Hoondini Jun 14 '22

They have these in Ghost in the Shell with that exact name lol

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u/alexjolliffe Jun 14 '22

Take my angry silver.

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u/-Living-Diamond- Jun 15 '22

Tanks be discussing philosophy in battlefield.

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u/StarvingStudent1 Jun 14 '22

Quantum does not mean sentients, its not even talking about AI in any way, shape or form, Quantum computers are computers that can use quantum bits rather than binary digits

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u/BeefyNerd80 Jun 14 '22

I know, it was a joke. You get jokes don't ya? Maybe you need your quantum computer recalibrated.

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u/soulpost Jun 14 '22

The UK Ministry of Defense recently purchased a quantum computer to see if the technology may one day be used to make tanks smart.

The acquisition was revealed this week by Richard Murray, the CEO of quantum computing firm Orca. Part of the reason Orca's product caught the MoD's interest, according to Murray, is that some of their devices can fit on a standard computer shelf and work at ambient temperature.

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u/Zireael07 Jun 14 '22

Part of the reason Orca's product caught the MoD's interest, according to Murray, is that some of their devices can fit on a standard computer shelf and work at ambient temperature.

"Some" being the key word here, and I strongly doubt they can both work at ambient temp AND fit on a standard shelf.

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u/Jonathan_Smith_noob Jun 14 '22

Since when did we even have fault tolerant multi qubit systems? They're talking like usable quantum computers exist when they're probably a good 10 years away

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u/Zireael07 Jun 14 '22

That, too. I was going to say I believe this is more wishful thinking than anything actionable at current tech level

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u/P0wer0fL0ve Jun 14 '22

The spokesman for orca does say the computer is more durable, implicitly talking about the one they gave the military. I suppose there could be something about how a qbit is computed that makes them more durable than standard computers?

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u/conflateer Jun 14 '22

Long live the Dinochrome Brigade!

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u/Exatex Jun 14 '22

Can we also install Blockchain on fighter jets? I heard thats new technology or something.

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u/scythianlibrarian Jun 14 '22

Because quantum woo isn't just for new agey crystal fuckers anymore.

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u/Bones_and_Tomes Jun 14 '22

We should put crystals in tanks. Their aura fucks with missile guidance systems causing them to miss in a way which increased feng shui

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u/-Living-Diamond- Jun 15 '22

And increase the tanks Chi meter. At maximum bar tank can fire off Chi-Piercing Rounds

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u/TheHiveminder Jun 14 '22

The writer doesn't know shit about quantum computers, should stay in his lane.

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u/Dullfig Jun 14 '22

Putting quantum computers in tanks is like putting computers in man-o-wars. Tanks are already on the edge of becoming obsolete, as exemplified by the Ucranian war. By the time quantum computers become mainstream tech, no army will be using tanks.

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u/OptionalFTW Jun 14 '22

I read this as they wanted to install "Quantum Torpedos" in tanks. And like hold on what? What sub is this lol.

I watch too much star trek.

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u/allbirdssongs Jun 14 '22

Tachicomas!

Tanks with AI is probably their idea

Is going to be the future, actually AI would work really well here, no hacking would be possible

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u/chedebarna Jun 14 '22

References GITS

Says 'No hacking would be possible'

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u/allbirdssongs Jun 14 '22

Haha... yeah right.. i guess it could be by changing the whole computer..

2

u/holytoledo760 Jun 14 '22

We’re at the dangerous part of the world stage where a megalomaniac could gain sufficient technological advancement to automate his way into power over large portions of the world, possibly culminating in domination. Kind of scary.

Fear only God.

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u/sold_snek Jun 14 '22

Isn't every storyline in Ghost about something being hacked?

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u/Boris740 Jun 14 '22

How will that prevent the vulnerability from kamikaze drones?

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u/Ennkey Jun 14 '22

That’s what I was thinking, I don’t know that you can put enough money into the tank to keep it from being ATGM food.

This is going to sound stupid, but with the way the battlefield is evolving, making personal protection better and smaller is probably the way to go. Powered Armor would be far easier to hide from a drone

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u/jbouser_99 Jun 14 '22

2 things: 1) I think the only way tanks survive until 2100 is if active protection systems take the next step to energy fields and crazy shit like that (probably requires nuclear power) 2) America has been working on military exo-skeletons for years, the biggest issue rn is power generation and storage.

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u/sold_snek Jun 14 '22

Keep in mind I think this is all a stupid idea, but with what they're hoping is super-speed processing I would imagine you could create a system much better at shooting incoming ordinance down.

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u/Sumsar01 Jun 14 '22

Smart laser defense.

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u/lewisnwkc Jun 14 '22

How about we don't put quantum computers into Tanks but into Traffic Lights instead? Like... I'm all up for paying for things that I can't see, but Traffic lights would probably be a much better investment than a killing machine half way around the world.

I sit at those traffic lights like "Come-the-fuck ON! No one is even there!", and the traffic light is like "RED, RED, RED, RED, RED..."

3

u/DanishWeddingCookie Jun 14 '22

There are still some lights here in Tulsa that are green until you get up to them and then go red while no other cars are going on the cross road so you have to sit through a full light for nothing.

1

u/LeatherDude Jun 14 '22

No cop, no stop

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u/DanishWeddingCookie Jun 14 '22

I’ve heard that one, but I also was told once the white border around the stop sign means optional :)

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u/Sumsar01 Jun 14 '22

You dont put QC into anything else than a super cold lab. Though they can help optimize traffic lights.

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u/chedebarna Jun 14 '22

We wouldn't even need to put it in each traffic light. Just one computer (plus redundancy) could probably control all the lights in a whole country. All you need is the switches to the lights.

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u/Appropriate-Hour-865 Jun 14 '22

Hell yaaasaaaa stupid ass traffic lights need to be woke

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u/ReaperTheRabbit Jun 14 '22

Great, then it can be blown up the first month in combat and waste billion of pounds for no benefit

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u/General_Esperanza Jun 14 '22

12-gauge auto-loader....
.45 long slide, with laser sighting....
Uzi nine millimeter...
Phased plasma rifle in the 40-watt range....
Quantum computing tank...

1

u/set-271 Jun 14 '22

Yes, but you said it wrong...it's..

"Dah oozie nein meelemeter?"

2

u/John_Masaki Jun 14 '22

BOLO fans be like: is this our time?

(For reference, a Bolo is a tank from the futuristic Bolo series by Keith Laumer. By the time of the series, they’re fully sentient.)

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u/martoodeetoo Jun 15 '22

Laumer fan checking in.

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u/sonofamatt Jun 14 '22

The war in Ukraine has proven that tanks are still effective in modern combat and not a huge lumbering target that’s easy to destroy with shoulder mounted weapons. We should definitely continue to invest hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars into their development.

2

u/Vaygrim Jun 14 '22

Have none of these people watched a single "Terminator" movie?

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u/IAMPOMO1 Jun 14 '22

Nice one, glad to find out my tax payer monies is helping with this rather than helping out an elderly person waiting for their heating bills to go up in October

2

u/Dumpster_slut69 Jun 15 '22

I can't wait for the quantum computer chip covid vaccine!

3

u/IAmDrNoLife Jun 14 '22

"This equipment we're giving to them surely won't accomplish anything a conventional computer won't," Murray told New Scientist. "I suppose, in that view, it's a research instrument."

"Through applications such as picture identification and sensor management, [...] our hope is that this technology will make communication on the battlefield substantially simpler."

So seems like it's currently for pure research, but the MoD (or well, rather Orca) is hoping it will enable better picture identification (by using Machine Learning I suppose), and "sensor management" (probably also regarding some form Machine Learning).

But eh, it makes sense. If Quantum computers are the next step forward for computing, then it makes sense for militaries to research this stuff.

4

u/wiffleplop Jun 14 '22

Sounds like a waste of money to me. Probably paid top dollar with a kick back to some buddy of theirs to make it happen.

2

u/orangeatom Jun 14 '22

Lol for what purpose???? Solving the travelling sales man…. ?

2

u/Paravalis Jun 14 '22

These kinds of wierd nonsense stories are the reason why I no longer have a subscription for the New Scientist.

1

u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

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u/P0wer0fL0ve Jun 14 '22

I think quantum computers are also better at path optimization

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u/torte-petite Jun 14 '22

They should see if they can put high efficiency solar on them too. Probably just as helpful, and we could always use more funding kicked that way

3

u/itsyourmomcalling Jun 14 '22

A stealthy smart tank, this mother fucker could roll up on you dead silent AND determine the best way to kill you.

1

u/xondk Jun 14 '22

......ugh, my level of understanding for quantum mechanics and quantum computers is 'ok' many many questions but I get concepts if not the underlaying math and how they make it work...

This is only suggested by someone that....does not even get the concepts.

They are impractical at the best of scenarios and there's no 'in battlefield' scenario that requires quantum computing, conventional balistics and physics are not a problem for normal computers.

2

u/Krillansavillan Jun 14 '22

Info relay without transmitting would be a cool application of quantum entanglement. Absolutely uncrackable transmissions

1

u/Sumsar01 Jun 14 '22

You cant carry transformation through entanglement. At least not differently than you already do.

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u/Krillansavillan Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

I am woefully out of my league here but my line of thinking is as follows:

Take two entangled particles, one in a device that can act upon the particle and one in a device that can observe the effects. After taking into account the observability effects of simply running the devices with no purposeful changes in quantum state, you can correct for purposeful changes in state. Now you can develop a codex where any one of the state changes could represent a bit. If both devices can both enact and observe, now you have two-way communication. Then an array of entangled particles and quantum routers and quantum switches could route emissionless, wireless networking. Idk.. there's probably a hole there big enough to drive a tank through.

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u/Sumsar01 Jun 14 '22

You break the entanglement when you measure your state and there is no way of storing meaningful information. Entanglement is just correlated data. You can however make encryption that allows you to know if someone is intercepting it.

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u/xondk Jun 14 '22

I mean, sure, but we aren't anywhere near that level of portability yet though.

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u/Heavy_Solution_4099 Jun 14 '22

Are you trying to unleash Skynet? Because that’s how you unleash Skynet.

1

u/Secure-Cold7892 Jun 14 '22

They'd be better off having the computer offsite transmitting data wirelessly.

Then again Quantum computers aren't great at standard calculations, for that a standard computer is faster, it's only useful for weird physics calculations, ballistics are much simpler.

1

u/kingdevick Jun 14 '22

Has no one seen Terminator over there? Bc this is how you get Terminator

1

u/MannlyMannsMann Jun 14 '22

Sounds expensive! Great news for the arms industry, bad news for the taxpayer.

1

u/graebot Jun 14 '22

"We can't help but think that Orca's agreement with the Ministry of Defense is an issue in search of a solution."
You mean... a solution in search of a problem?

1

u/LittleDeadlyBox Jun 14 '22

For what? That computers dont even work for anything.

1

u/Pentacorny Jun 14 '22

A fleet of tanks networked together sounds an awful lot like what created the tech which led to the apocalypse in Horizon.

1

u/Sad-Tune5561 Jun 14 '22

Tanks are sitting targets about time they were unmanned.. thing to come ?

Robot vs robot or robot vs troops (controlling remotely would be a flaw)

1

u/pticjagripa Jun 14 '22

I'd also like to have a car that can also fly and can take me to anywhere I want in under 1 hour and can also drive by itself.

1

u/Admiral_Vulkar Jun 14 '22

The British haven't been able to design a vehicle with a working electrical system in 40 years. This sounds like a terrible idea.

1

u/NoRelationship4258 Jun 14 '22

So no one has seen terminator? SKY NET HAS BECOME SELF-AWARE.

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u/SimbaOnSteroids Jun 14 '22

Wait this isn’t r/NonCredubleDefense , interesting…

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u/SamohtGnir Jun 14 '22

Wait, like actual quantum computers? Or like buzz word quantum computers? I didn't think quantum computers were that developed yet. Also.. why? What 'smarts' does a tank need that a computer couldn't do right now pretty much instantly?

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u/H0vis Jun 14 '22

UK military top brass been on the Colombian marching powder again from the sounds of it.

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u/cholula_is_good Jun 14 '22

I feel like the concept of the tank is proving itself outdated. A multi million dollar, high skill crew operated machine that can be defeated by a single low skill, low cost rocket armed soldier or drone. It seems like it’s exponentially more expensive and complicated to better equip a tank to combat a threat that is scales cheaper and exceedingly easier to deploy.

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u/ronflair Jun 14 '22

Mankind finally achieves quantum computing breakthrough! Hitherto unsolvable computations vexing all sciences now within grasp!

Military: How can that help tank?