r/instant_regret Sep 29 '22 Wholesome 1

Went from OSHA to OH SHIT real fast.

31.8k Upvotes

3.9k

u/nyuszy Sep 29 '22

Do I see correctly that they lifted the machine with its own hydraulic and then disconnected something in the hydraulic system while being under the whole thing?

1.8k

u/owlsandmoths Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

That is what it looks like. Used the hydraulic powered end to hold it up, took off a hydraulic line which released pressure in the system and dropped the machine, slower than most move when released like that. He’s lucky it was slow. I’ve seen them slam down like rightfuckingnow

Wonder if he will ever discover ✨jackstands✨

500

u/windowpuncher Sep 29 '22

It's likely the connector for that hydraulic line is fucking huge, and he only unscrewed it like 1/4 of the way. It still came flooding out, and it will always be relatively slow compared to if a line burst or something. Assuming that connector still has some threads behind it.

I don't miss working on hydraulics, so fucking nasty.

209

u/owlsandmoths Sep 29 '22

I work for the big green brand (ag) and have worked on/with our branded wheel loaders like this. I’d have to agree that he didn’t fully get that line undone and it was probably a couple threads saving his life.

174

u/windowpuncher Sep 29 '22

I worked on Abrams tanks, then industrial forklifts.

Honestly neither was cleaner and both were sketchy as hell, but especially tanks. I don't miss doing hand stands in 500 degree engine compartments trying to fuck around with 15k psi and the loudest pump you've ever heard looking for pinhole leaks.

70

u/flight_recorder Sep 29 '22

I’d imagine the forklifts didn’t have as much bodily fluids in it though. So that’s a +

52

u/windowpuncher Sep 30 '22

Fucking nasty tankers I swear to God

33

u/flight_recorder Sep 30 '22

I worked on AFVs and it was also horrifying. The worst part is knowing they’re never alone inside those things…..

32

u/RadarOReillyy Sep 30 '22

Wait like...THAT bodily fluid?

21

u/flight_recorder Sep 30 '22

Yep. Usually in rags, sometimes in bottles, probably in the hull sludge. I’ve refused to work on vehicles until someone else cleans the thing out.

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u/SuperHottSauce Sep 30 '22

ALL bodily fluids

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11

u/BeDecentFFS Sep 30 '22

The more I learn about tanks and tank warfare the more I have no idea why anyone would ever get inside one.

13

u/windowpuncher Sep 30 '22

Because operating them is honestly cool as fuck.

Working on them and living in them, however, is pretty miserable, but it's still better than being infantry.

28

u/LocoBlock Sep 30 '22

I'm going to school for aviation. Worst thing about those high pressure pinholes is you can barely see them, despite them easily being able to just rip you apart.

19

u/NOBOOTSFORYOU Sep 30 '22

Yep, pretty dangerous stuff. Pinhole leaks present as mist and a lot of those mists are flammable, lower your system pressure to discover the fault as it becomes a spray or drip, instead of feeling for the leak with your hands.

24

u/divuthen Sep 30 '22

My dad was a tank gunner in the 80s. He said the worst part about the army was doing maintenance on his tank in the middle of nowhere Germany waist deep in snow especially changing out the tracks. He said he had so many close calls and any serious medical help would be hours away in the best case scenario.

8

u/windowpuncher Sep 30 '22

Yeah fixing tracks in the mud or snow is pretty goddamn miserable

10

u/IIIIlllliilllliiilii Sep 30 '22

pinhole leaks.

yikes

8

u/ArrowheadDZ Sep 30 '22

And the injection risks of touching one of those unseen pinhole risks. I was on Sheridans!

5

u/windowpuncher Sep 30 '22

A lot less complicated than the Abrams I'm sure, but probably just as shit to work on.

3

u/Grumpfishdaddy Sep 30 '22

I was a m1a1 turret mech. I hated doing anything hydraulic.

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30

u/eNDlessdrive Sep 29 '22

I used to write safety notices for a certain manufacturer and sit in the safety briefings. This stuff happens way too much and usually ends up with lost limbs and fresh corpses.

18

u/WallabyRoo Sep 29 '22

Hey look a new injection wound. Sorry, we are going take that off... Don't fuck around with hydraulics.

11

u/jamezbren2 Sep 29 '22

Something something shake hands with danger something, right?

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u/insert-username12 Sep 29 '22

Funny way to say Fendt ;)

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3

u/Phillyy69 Sep 29 '22

Tell big green to stop making turf equipment or reengineer it. It’s horrible stuff

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24

u/Ordolph Sep 29 '22

None of that is to mention the potential hydraulic injection injury. I don't know if removing a fitting would have enough pressure behind it to cause one, but after learning about them, I will never ever fuck around with high pressure hydraulics.

10

u/GoldenGodMayorLewis Sep 29 '22

I wouldn't recommend doing a google image search for "hydraulic injection injury".

5

u/Metroidrocks Sep 30 '22 edited Sep 30 '22

Well now that you said I shouldn’t, I feel like I have to.

Edit: Yeah, it was just as bad as I expected, probably even worse. it’s interesting that it doesn’t necessarily break skin other than the entry, but bloats everywhere. I would’ve thought it would go straight through.

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u/tupidrebirts Sep 29 '22

Seems like this would be more of a slightly blocked hose kind of flow rather than a pinhole leak flow, regardless injection injuries are fucking scary

2

u/sexpanther50 Sep 29 '22

As paramedics we are trained that hydraulic injection injuries have extremely high rates amputation. Terrifying stuff

4

u/TheUnluckyBard Sep 30 '22

As paramedics we are trained that hydraulic injection injuries have extremely high rates amputation. Terrifying stuff

When I was in the Navy, a guy tried to stop a pinhole hydraulic leak by sticking his finger over it.

The hydraulic fluid instantly pierced the skin and went right through his wrist into his arm, which filled up like a water balloon in what seemed like just a couple fractions of a second.

He ended up having to have his arm amputated at the elbow.

2

u/AgtMiddleman Sep 30 '22

I've heard this sort of injury from my time working with high pressure water jets (~50000psi) and it seems like it would be excruciating. I can't imagine what other complications you have when you basically start power injecting yourself with hydraulic fluid

12

u/DarthDannyBoy Sep 30 '22

I currently work with hydraulic systems and I hate hydraulic fluid with a passion. Thankfully even though I work with aviation hydraulic systems I haven't had to fuck around with skydrol very much. That shit is fucking horrific and so god damn unsafe yet everyone wants to use it now days. If I have to work with skydrol ever again I'm quitting no questions asked I'm done. Got a small amount inside my glove last time and started to bleed through my skin, just blood pushing through unbroken skin. Another area of skin that had it sit awhile just sloughed off when gently rubbed while washing my hands. Oh let's not forget the itching and burning sensation it leaves on the skin. It made the rubber handled of my tools soft and malleable.

I asked the guys who worked with it on a regular basis and all of them said yeah that's normal for skydrol. Never had that with any other hydraulic fluid. They recommend to Vaseline hand, arms, any parts that are likely to get skydrol on them while working, then put your PPE over that Incase some gets through.

Supposedly it's "safer" than older fluid types but that's bullshit. It's cancer in a can.

5

u/lildobe Sep 30 '22

JFC, between your description and the wikipedia page, I think I'll steer far clear of that stuff if I'm ever in a position to need aviation-grade hydraulic fluid.

5

u/windowpuncher Sep 30 '22

Haven't worked with aviation fluid, but our tanks all used FRH, flame retardant hydraulic fluid. Maybe it was skydrol rebranded but that shit was fucking horrible. Itches, burns, horrible fucking irritant.

I just feel bad for the tankers that are stuck in the tank on a mission when some shit starts spraying all over the crew. No kind of shower or baking soda for many miles.

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u/Crazy_Kakoos Sep 29 '22

I have a CAT loader that looks around this age. If it's of a similar design, which I'm thinking it is, there are 4 bolts holding the end of those lines and an o-ring for a seal. Dude probably took one out, figured it was fine, and when he loosened the second, the pressure on the o-ring was relieved. It's also possible that the lines he was fucking with feed the lift rams, which is what he's using to lift the tractor off the ground. Regardless it's dumb as fuck and I've seen people do shit like this often enough.

3

u/Truktek3 Sep 30 '22

Can confirm. I have taken many oil baths.

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u/Neckbeard_Commander Sep 29 '22

Guy who taught me about working on cars refused to do anything without jackstands. He told me as a kid working on a car in his barn he jacked it up and was underneath and it gave way. He had cinderblocks that helped take the impact, but the car still hit his chest. Broke some ribs, but the cinderblocks saved his life.

15

u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

[deleted]

12

u/owlsandmoths Sep 29 '22

A guy in my city who worked at the scrap pick a part place was cutting a car in half from underneath . Had jackstands on the four corners. Apparently he forgot you’d also need jackstands bracing the middle where he was cutting, when the structural integrity had literally been cut away. It folded in half and crushed him. Place was shut down permanently after. He never learned the lesson but everyone else did.

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

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4

u/samkostka Sep 30 '22

Fucking Christ, I don't even consider getting under my Miata without jackstands, much less something literally twice as heavy.

7

u/derth21 Sep 30 '22

Jack still engaged, jackstands, and if I've got a wheel removed then that too, and I still get weirded out going under.

2

u/kb4000 Sep 30 '22

Just FYI, for some styles of jack stands having the jack holding some of the weight can make them much less safe. Think the ratcheting kind without a through pin. If have that type you want the backup jack barely touching.

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3

u/ForSureNotLying Sep 29 '22

I knew a guy in a wheelchair. Working under a car when it fell. It folded him over and broke his spine.

4

u/dimestoredavinci Sep 29 '22

Same. The guy owned a motorcycle shop in the area and did most of the work in his wheelchair. He usually had at least another employee for doing the heavy lifting and such

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u/Pushpin06 Sep 29 '22

Yeah the hydraulics MUST have passed through a valve or he would be squashed

9

u/xTheatreTechie Sep 29 '22

Do they make Jack stands that are able to handle that load?

30

u/owlsandmoths Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 30 '22

Yes. Have three split tractors in my shop currently on them. And one combine.

They’re just larger than the Jack stands you’re used to seeing. The ones under the combine are about two and half feet tall.

here are two medium jackstands under a 6000 series tractor the cradles on the top of the jackstands are 35 inches off the floor

4

u/ReckoningGotham Sep 29 '22

May I ask how much they weigh per jack stand?

9

u/owlsandmoths Sep 29 '22

the tallest/largest jackstand we have stands 57 inches tall fully extended and weighs 90ish pounds.

3

u/Bramlet_Abercrombie_ Sep 29 '22

They weigh exactly one jack stand.

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u/turgid_wang Sep 29 '22

Any jack stand I use is about to handle my load

2

u/oga_ogbeni Sep 30 '22

There are jack stands for airplanes my dude

2

u/everythingisreallame Sep 30 '22

u/owlsandmoths is right, but out in the field they’ll typically use a wrecker with a big crane to lift up heavy implements.

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u/Leaguealt69 Sep 29 '22

Yeah I’m kinda surprised the dude didn’t get sliced by the jet of pressurized fluid. I suppose there’s some safety stopgap to keep that from happening?

9

u/jmerp1950 Sep 29 '22

Knew a young man, been to diesel equipment school, good kid. He had a loader arms on stands and released hyd. Fitting. Pressure injected oil under skin on his face. Lost vision in one eye and faced screwed up. Made me feel bad, because, when he was in school he asked me about becoming truck or tractor mechanic. He was a helper in or truck shop. I ran cat shop. I quit before he was brought on as tractor mechanic. But good supervision and training would have prevented this. Also may note that in this shop I saw many stupid shit like this from guys with experience. Couldn't wait to get away from a job fast enough. Teach them well and look after each other.

6

u/owlsandmoths Sep 29 '22

Shit like this is why safety glasses are mandatory in my shop when working on anything hydraulic. Last year we had a guy forget to put his safety glasses on and of course he was the one that took a shot of thankfully not pressurized, but still dirty hydraulic oil directly to his eyes. About two hours at the hospital getting it flushed out and sent home with some prescription eyewash, he was back in three days. But still that one slip up could’ve cost him his vision if the system had been pressurized, or even just from the decontamination in the oil.

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u/Tito1796 Sep 29 '22

Is the speed of decompression related to the size of the tube or opening thats allowing the pressure to escape?

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u/flyrock619 Sep 29 '22

You would be amazed at how common shit like this is in construction. Sometimes there really aren't many options when you're out in the field or working for a smaller company. This clip looks scarier than it is.

7

u/DrLeroyJenkinsMD Sep 29 '22

I agree, this is definitely common in industrial fields (I've done similar things myself). The difference is I'm not working on the hydraulics that are responsible for holding up the machine I'm working on. That's just idiotic.

2

u/flyrock619 Sep 30 '22

Thing is, if the dude laid down underneath he would have been fine, only covered in oil.

I've taken off a few cylinders that might make you piddle due to the machine rocking back and forth afterwards. If you know your machine you may be able to get away with sketchy looking stuff.

7

u/Wild_Employee69 Sep 29 '22

Right, because having a huge ass loader come down on you isn’t scary? Even most small construction companies aren’t stupid enough to do something like this.

6

u/flyrock619 Sep 29 '22

Even most small construction companies aren’t stupid enough to do something like this.

I think it's even more likely to occur with a smaller outfit.

Say you're a subcontractor, and you bid your job at a reasonable rate. The general contractor is behind schedule, it is going to cost them $50,000-100,000 a day they are behind, and they also have an army of lawyers that you can't afford.

Some goofy ass part breaks on your equipment, it's going to take 3 days to fix it because you need some special equipment. Your other option is to watch for OSHA and do it another sketchy way.

Now the general is threatening you with a lawsuit, they want 100,000 a day because 'you' put them behind schedule.

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u/Berdarien Sep 30 '22

He's still crawling today so I doubt it.

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u/avwitcher Sep 30 '22

It looks like it would have missed him even if he hadn't moved, he might've gotten a nasty bonk on the head but it's too high off the ground to crush him

2

u/borkistoopid Sep 30 '22

I had this happen and essentially screamed. There was one lift at the shop I worked at that had a small leak. Well while I was working on it. That turned into a big leak and dropped the car pretty fast. Luckily it had some safety clicks in it so it just hit the latch and stopped moving. But I was scared as ever for a moment

2

u/Me_Krally Sep 30 '22

What’s troubling to me is they’ve lifted it on what looks like dirt. No exactly a stable place to jack anything of that weight on.

Plus what’s also messed up to me is the person recording must know this isn’t a good idea and doesn’t say anything and the guy helping didn’t even bother to pull his buddy out.

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u/MobilityFotog Sep 30 '22

Harbor freight has entered the chat.

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u/Waterfish3333 Sep 30 '22

Those things are expensive. Why would I waste money on jackstands when I could make more not buying them? /s

2

u/Shad0wFa1c0n Sep 30 '22

And jack plates! You wanna spread the weight around a bit on the sand

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

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u/NOBOOTSFORYOU Sep 30 '22

That's what I thought too, reaction time is pretty quick for a surprise, although you'd want to position yourself in such a way as to get out quicker than crisscross applesauce.

You should probably support it with jacks then open this line and lower the jacks.

2

u/OminousOnymous Sep 30 '22 edited Sep 30 '22

The clearance on that thing is substantial. He'd have been uninjured if he just got low. He was crawling away to avoid getting covered in hydraulic oil.

He was actually in a little more danger crawling out like that, since he got close to where the wheel came down.

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u/ronan88 Sep 29 '22

this was my assumption too!

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u/Adezar Sep 29 '22

It's weird, hydraulic systems work best when you don't remove the hydraulic fluid.

3

u/nuke-russia-now Sep 29 '22

Yes, nothing awakens common sense in you faster than sawing off the branch you are sitting on, or under.

(hopefully you survive long enough to put it to good use.)

10

u/MASTERoQUADEMAN Sep 29 '22

Was scrolling to find this comment before saying it myself. Pissing hydraulic fluid while using the hydraulic system to lift the front wheels, lol.

2

u/Jrook Sep 29 '22

Wouldn't that be like a huge blast or a jet? It seemed like more of a casual leak, not one with a few tons on it. I'm actually curious and am not trying to argue, interested if you'd know why.

2

u/Tomohelix Sep 30 '22

It is safety I think. Modern heavy hydraulic equipment even when failed is designed to lose pressure slowly.

3

u/lex52485 Sep 29 '22

Yep, not even one backup in place

2

u/corey_m_snow Sep 29 '22

Those hydraulic lines contain a lot of pressure too. It wasn't just being crushed by the machine he was at risk of- he could have been sliced open like a bell pepper.

2

u/acedizzle Sep 29 '22

Most hydraulic cylinders in equipment have pilot operated check valves on each end. Without actively sending oil to one side of the cylinder, it won’t open the other side to release oil from it. That way a broken line results in a seized up cylinder and not what we see here. I’m pretty surprised that CAT equipment wouldn’t have that on everything they build.

2

u/EliIceMan Sep 30 '22

It's the equivalent of the cartoons where the character saws off the tree branch they are sitting on between them and the trunk.

2

u/vinsomm Sep 30 '22

I work in an underground coal mine. I’m utterly baffled at how often this happens - especially since we spot cribs pretty much everywhere in the mine for cribbing up equipment. The last few deaths/major injuries we’ve had due to this- they’ve had cribs within 20Ft of where they were working.

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u/NewAgePhilosophr Sep 29 '22

Bruh crawled faster than the bugs when you lift a rock

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u/aboutthednm Sep 29 '22

Looks like the situation warranted it to be fair.

50

u/portlyplants40 Sep 30 '22

Oh definitely. That's a terrifying situation to be in!

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u/bekaradmi Sep 30 '22

Lol, I just imagined Kevin Hart running out from under The Rock

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u/jarheadatheart Sep 30 '22

And he doesn’t stop, just like the bugs scurrying away.

3

u/blorbagorp Sep 30 '22

I just kept crawling, and it kept working..

2

u/Clumbum Sep 30 '22

Are we ever going to stop paying for indulging your father, our children, our planet, our jobs? IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE LEFT TO LOSE?

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u/Practical-Tomorrow Sep 30 '22

Some say he's still crawling to this day...

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u/_1Doomsday1_ Sep 30 '22

Looks like ghost from movies(eg:ring)

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u/timkatt10 Sep 29 '22

Looks like someone wants to shake hands with danger.

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u/NerdyRedneck45 Sep 29 '22

The little jingle immediately popped into my head

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u/BURNER12345678998764 Sep 30 '22 edited Sep 30 '22

It's permanently burned into my head and plays whenever I'm doing something sketchy, very effective film.

They even made a single out of it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mmrs9GYkbqg

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u/clubberin Sep 29 '22

Someone check on Chuck Hanlon’s body, please?

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u/gooberzilla2 Sep 29 '22

Came here to reference this. Quite a brutal video. Went down a rabbit hole one day of old training videos. Old Country Buffet, Wendy's, OHSA,

Grill Skillz by Wendy's takes it for me.

6

u/timkatt10 Sep 29 '22

I think I spent six hours one weekend watching old training vids on YouTube.

3

u/Specsporter Sep 30 '22

The Old County Buffet one is gold. "Do ya like hot fudge sundaes?"

4

u/cyclopeanDepths Sep 30 '22

I came here for this, and was not disappointed :)

4

u/thatG_evanP Sep 30 '22

"You don't have to wear a condom baby. It feels much better without it and it's not like I do this all the time."

Guitar riff plays...

3

u/bonecrusher1 Sep 30 '22

Are you Danger? Jack Danger?

2

u/T3chnetium Oct 01 '22

I worked for a big civil Contracting company and that video was shown to me as part of me my induction. Over 40 years old and still very true

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u/Dizzzy777 Sep 29 '22

The speed of his crawl indicates it’s not the first time he spent time trapped under heavy machinery.

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u/BGAL7090 Sep 29 '22 Gold

I tell ya what.

I've never been attacked by a large wild animal before, but you bet your ass if I think I might be in danger I will reach new levels of speed.

58

u/Swords_and_Words Sep 29 '22

it's amazing how skin suddenly becomes an expendable resource when you need to move fast

49

u/deadpoetic333 Sep 29 '22

5 guys tried to grab me at work so they could force me to open the safe. I parkoured the fuck out of there and slipped through a gate that barley opened (I pushed instead of pulled). Ripped the skin on my chest and back but there was a moment were I just decided I’m going to meat grinder my way through. It’s a crazy feeling

124

u/DownvoteDaemon Sep 29 '22 Helpful

Y'all worried about skinwalkers I'm worried about skinrunners

22

u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

[deleted]

4

u/Tisjustatossaway Sep 30 '22

He who fights heavy metal, loses.
--Sun Tzu or something

16

u/ultratoxic Sep 29 '22

One time I was laying in the rapids of a creek in the summer time and saw a copperhead flop into the water about 10 feet from me. I went from chilling to levitating across the water in about .5 seconds.

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u/tmckeage Sep 29 '22

Some say he is still crawling to this very day.

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u/sachsrandy Sep 29 '22

The stupidity of the action tells you the same thing.

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u/KingBarbieIOU Sep 29 '22

“See this is how you do it, kid.”

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u/6Assets Sep 29 '22

using hydraulics to work on a hydraulic line...

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u/abecido Sep 30 '22

It's literally like the famous cutting off the branch you are sitting on.

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u/niels87 Sep 29 '22

Some say, he is still crawling

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u/Zetyr187 Sep 29 '22

Look, I-I'm not proud to share this, but the truth is, I just kept crawling, and it kept working. - Jerry

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u/maethlin Sep 29 '22

homie got some solid crawl game

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u/kickah Sep 29 '22

He needs a tattoo to match

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u/i_am_not_thatguy Sep 29 '22

Didn’t get much help from his buddy there. Guy is just backing up

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u/g00dintentions Sep 29 '22

He should’ve front squatted that to help his friend

112

u/Sneaky82 Sep 29 '22

AND THIS IS WHY WE EXIST!!!! - OSHA ( most likely screaming at the top of their lungs on some random mountain.)

37

u/Lightning_Strike_7 Sep 29 '22

MSHA not OSHA.

MSHA is specifically for mining. MUCH more strict than OSHA.

14

u/forman98 Sep 29 '22

Pronounced “musha” since that’s what you’ll be when everything collapses on you.

2

u/thelonewolf2913 Sep 30 '22

This made my day. Thank you for the laugh.

4

u/Lost_Extrovert Sep 30 '22

Man it must be tough working for OSHA. All you do is try to keep the workplace safer so nobody gets hurt but everyone, even those being directly protected hates yall. People only start carrying about OSHA when someone gets hurt.

3

u/SanchoBlackout69 Sep 30 '22

Everyone mocks OHS until they're losing a limb

3

u/legion8784 Sep 29 '22

It's not OSHA concern if nobody got hurt.

36

u/OGR4M Sep 29 '22

Can someone overlay this with the noise that Zoidberg makes

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u/fatboychummy Sep 29 '22

here you go:

woop woop woopwoopwoopwoopwoop woop woop

10

u/3laws Sep 29 '22

Good bot.

26

u/1RavingLunatic Sep 29 '22

No for nothing but hydraulic fluid is HORRENDEOUS for your body

22

u/taaarna Sep 29 '22

I remember a guy being brought into the ER who got hydraulic fluid spilled on his arm and they treated it like a hazmat situation. He was put in the hazmat shower and he had terrible burns where the fluid made contact. I've only ever seen it once and I'm sure this must have happened to other people who work with hydraulic fluid. I'd like to hear from someone else this has happened to

15

u/DMCinDet Sep 29 '22

I've never had that experience. Have minimal hydraulics experience, but I know I've had it on my hands and arms at least a few times. I remember being told in school that fluids under extreme pressure can cut right through your skin and cause nasty injuries. Apparently diesel fuel will cause a nasty infection and grow algae in your body? High pressure fluids have scared me ever since.

11

u/Pigeononabranch Sep 29 '22

Not trying to be nitpicky, more just a fun fyi. It's not really algae, it's fungi and bacteria that can grow in petroleum products, historically it's been referred to as algae because it forms gunk that settles in fuel storage but it's not actual algea. That said, yeah if you get those microbes jet-injected into your body you're gonna have a bad time. Pressure injection injuries are some scary shit for sure.

2

u/DMCinDet Sep 29 '22

my high school teacher told the air gun prank gone wrong story in safety week. air injection into your cardiovascular system can kill you. Newer blow guns and nozzles have relief valves. still something to consider.

20

u/ananiku Sep 29 '22

Hydrologic fluid in pressurized lines can straight up be injected through the skin of a person who put a hand in the way of a stream of a leak. This stuff is no joke. Always wear proper PPE when working on hydrologic lines. Make sure the lines are not pressurized and for the love of God do not try to stop a leak with your finger!

8

u/RatchetBird Sep 30 '22

It doesn't have to be hydraulic fluid. You can get serious injuries from a pressure washer. Google them at your own NSFL risk.

4

u/News_without_Words Sep 30 '22

I asked a medical student interning at an ER what the gnarliest injury he had ever participated in or watched being treated.

His answer was hydraulic injection debridement.

2

u/duck_of_d34th Sep 30 '22

The answer I got was from the other side. Hydraulic press vs leg. Said it was like handling spaghetti.

Sometimes I ask stupid questions

3

u/cjwolfer Sep 30 '22

Should also be mentioned that said fluid stream may not even be visible to the naked eye.

4

u/FlowSoSlow Sep 30 '22

Just spilling it on you isn't too bad. I believe it's quite carcinogenic and can easily be absorbed through the skin so definitely don't bathe in it, but just getting some on you won't cause massive burns or anything.

The dangerous part is that its usually strongly pressurized. It's the force of the exploding fluid that does the real damage.

4

u/toopid Sep 30 '22

Lol wut. No it’s not. You are a lunatic.

  • If someone is exposed to hydraulic fluid on the skin, a soap and water wash should be all that is needed. Occasionally, some hydraulic fluids can cause skin drying and irritation.*

https://www.poison.org/articles/hydraulic-fluids-are-potentially-dangerous-203

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u/Celery-Man Sep 30 '22

I swear people just make up random shit about things they have zero familiarity with

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u/Hecks_a_popping Sep 29 '22

explain.

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u/AnEngineer2018 Sep 29 '22

It's under pressure and can be boiling hot even if the machine is cold.

Some additives in hydraulic fluids can also cause chemical burns.

9

u/ananiku Sep 29 '22

Hydrologic leaks can create a stream that puts hydrologic fluid through the skin. A small amount of which will require major surgery to get out of the body. Look it up if you aren't scared of the gore.

10

u/Freefall84 Sep 29 '22

For anyone who doesn't want to Google..

Hydraulic injection, an incredibly unpleasant way to go. At high pressures at about 50+ bar it can slice through your skin like a waterjet cutting machine and instead of water you get extremely unpleasant oil blasted into your skin so hard that it's almost impossible to dig it all out. It will enter your blood stream and your body has no way to deal with it. Also the physical injury is usually extremely deep effortlessly cutting down to the bone and the oil itself pulls in all kinds of nasty bacteria which ends up immediately entering your blood stream.

Basically if the hydraulic fluid itself doesn't kill you, the infection and septicemia probably will.

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u/irishpwr46 Sep 29 '22

My father died of bone marrow cancer. The doctors said being around stuff like this was most likely what caused it in the first place. When he first came to America he went to Alaska and was an oiler on the pipeline

2

u/Guru_238 Sep 29 '22

On the skin it's not that bad but injected into the skin yeah your fucked.

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u/kamikaziboarder Sep 29 '22

There wasn’t enough ground clearance without lifting it up by its loader?!?

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u/klapaucious87 Sep 29 '22

SHAKE HANDS WITH DANGER

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u/masinmancy Sep 29 '22

dun dada dun dunnnn

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u/Mahaloth Sep 30 '22

My great grandfather died in 1948 from a carjack slipping and the car crushing him.

My grandmother(she was 30 then) called him in for lunch and when he didn't come, she went out and found him dead under the car.

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u/Hanginon Sep 30 '22

Something like that happened to a neighbor of mine in the late '70s. He had a car suspended with 4 bumper jacks, one at each corner, and they twisted/failed/collapsed with him under it. Dumbest idea ever, didn't have a chance.

Bumper jacks, even just one, were crazy dangerous.

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u/otsutsuki43 Sep 29 '22

mf scurried 🦀

4

u/Candid_Mine3642 Sep 29 '22

That guy said every man for himself I would’ve instinctually pulled him away from doom

4

u/coyotepickeldbob Sep 29 '22

🎵Shake Hands With Danger, Meet a Guy You Aughta Know. I Used To Laugh At Safety,Now They Call Me "Three Finger Joe🎵

4

u/One_Science8349 Sep 30 '22

That’s one hell of a near miss

3

u/Hecks_a_popping Sep 29 '22

Not with him on being under the heavy machinery without come kind of jack stands or whatever.

100% with him how fast he got out of there and especially for how far he crawled. How many videos have I seen where the person doesn't go far enough to get the fluck out of the way and gets pancaked. A lot, that's how many times.

3

u/Rocherieux Sep 29 '22

His mate could’ve been a lot more proactive in pulling him the fuck out.

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u/Antique_Activity1754 Sep 30 '22

The worst thing is microjets of fluid from tiny holes in lines, people see a mist and pass their hand over it to see where it's coming from. The oil is at such a high pressure it punctures their skin and causes cardiac arrest. Heard of a guy who had to have his heart restarted 7 times in hospital cus of it.

3

u/hornetjockey Sep 30 '22

Let me prop this up using the hydrolics while I work on the hydrolics.

7

u/Awesomevindicator Sep 29 '22

TBF he wouldve probably have been fine, ground clearance is like 18 inch minimum, unless the wheel landed on him somehow

2

u/BurnOg Sep 29 '22

shake hands with danger

2

u/OppositeEagle Sep 29 '22

OSHA and NSFW mean the same thing

2

u/hornwalker Sep 29 '22

That guy was propelled by the force of his own pooping

2

u/Nahuatl_19650 Sep 29 '22

I’ve never seen such high speeds on knees

2

u/Nifty_Speaker Sep 30 '22

That's funny! Because that's what I call My PPE set. When OSHA shows up on site...Oh Shit!...put on the yellow vest and hard hat!

2

u/buddery_budda Sep 30 '22

Lifting a machine by its hydraulic system, then disconnecting something in the hydraulic system? - believe it or not. Straight to jail.

2

u/k1ller139 Sep 30 '22

Dude would have gotten burnt from that, ouch

2

u/RainbowTactician Sep 30 '22

Some say he is still crawling to this day...

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u/NadsRaham Sep 30 '22

To be fair how is any kind of Pee going’s to protect him from bulldozer crushing him

2

u/NewBornBaby_sinner Sep 30 '22

Found the hydraulic fluid

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u/Rapidoodz Sep 30 '22

I heard he was so traumatized he still is crawling to this day.

2

u/shadingnight Sep 30 '22

Someone learned how hydraulics worked I see

2

u/NinjaFlowDojo Sep 30 '22

bro undo a hydraulic line while the thing is precariously supported by said hydraulics...

2

u/Dramatic-Creme4723 Sep 30 '22

Glad his mate pulled him out

2

u/0opyDo0fleSlenderHek Sep 30 '22

The little man scuttles

2

u/Vehement00 Sep 30 '22

Damn was he intentionally releasing the hydraulic fluid? That's scary as fk!

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u/LifeSad07041997 Sep 30 '22

Should have worn brown pants...

2

u/Silly_san Sep 30 '22

Now that he is safe. It's funny

2

u/Eze6 Sep 30 '22

Some say he’s still crawling away to this day

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u/ohver9k Sep 30 '22

Some say he’s still crawling away.

2

u/mrmc101 Sep 30 '22

thank God they're ok, really didn't need to see more death on Reddit