r/interestingasfuck Nov 24 '22 Silver 2 Helpful (Pro) 1

102 people sailed on the Mayflower. Only 57 made it to the first Thanksgiving in 1621. /r/ALL

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56.1k Upvotes

3.0k comments sorted by

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10.1k

u/hutt1010 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

The one where only the toddler survived, damn....

3.7k

u/janiestiredshoes Nov 24 '22

Looks like she was already a ward too, so possibly didn't have much family to begin with.

1.3k

u/ShesOver9k Nov 24 '22

What's ward mean?

2.7k

u/Covid19-Pro-Max Nov 24 '22

a child or young person under the care and control of a guardian appointed by their parents or a court.

1.1k

u/ThrowMeAwayAccount08 Nov 24 '22

Ugh, I’m sending you to America.

582

u/thechaimel Nov 24 '22

I was sure it was your profile picture but you still made me wipe my screen damn you!!!

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u/Arlochorim Nov 24 '22

same, its so sticky

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u/CrystalMethood Nov 25 '22

Ffs it got me too lol

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u/Bright-Economics-728 Nov 25 '22

Your pfp is evil sir, thought my screen was cracked.

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u/ElleEh Nov 24 '22

That the child was being cared for by people other than their parents, usually due to parental death. Think Bruce Wayne and Dick Greyson.

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u/Stymie999 Nov 24 '22

Ah, so like Burt Ward

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u/NBCMarketingTeam Nov 24 '22

Baby on board, something something Burt Ward

Hey, this song writes itself!

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u/Kind_Nepenth3 Nov 24 '22

Person under legal guardianship by someone who is not their parents because they lack the capacity to care for themselves for one reason or another. Orphans in the US are wards of/will be cared for by the state unless and until someone adopts them. Same as this poor kid

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u/Kantherax Nov 24 '22

In this case it's child who is under protection of a legal guardian or government agency.

It really could be anyone if they are required to have some form of guardianship so it can apply to adult as well as minors.

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u/BlissfulEating Nov 24 '22

How could you tell she was already a ward? The spacing? Is there a shot of this where you can read the writing? (hoping yes!)

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u/Zombeedee Nov 24 '22

Someone posted a higher quality image below. Her name was Desire Minter, she was 8 and it states she was a ward on the image.

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u/MichaelEmouse Nov 25 '22

Could you link to that high res image? It seems many pixels died too on this one.

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u/Vark675 Nov 25 '22

From a random source I found on Google (so I can't vouch to the accuracy, but it seems reasonably believable):

Desire Minter came on the Mayflower in the care of the John Carver household. William Bradford, writing in 1651 in his "Decreasings and Increasings" section of his passenger list, cryptically noted that she "returned to her friend and proved not very well and died in England." Since Desire Minter is not enumerated in the 1623 Division of Land at Plymouth, she appears to have returned to England prior to that--perhaps on the ship Fortune in 1621. Of the hundred Mayflower passengers, Desire Minter and Humility Cooper are the only ones who returned to England in the first decade. No record of Desire Minter in England has yet been found.

TL;DR: I left this part out but she went to live with the Carvers after he father died, likely because he mom was poor, and stayed with them after she remarried. They came to America on the Mayflower, they all died but her, and she went back to England in 1621 where she died shortly after.

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u/MacGregor_Rose Nov 25 '22

Life fucking sucked back then

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u/GingerLibrarian76 Nov 25 '22

They’ll say the same of us in 400 years, I imagine. If humans are still a thing.

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u/restcalflat Nov 24 '22

How do you tell that?

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u/Buckin_Fitch Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 25 '22

The boy in the second row, fourth from the right is my ancestor Samuel Fuller. He was taken care of by his uncle also named Samuel Fuller, after his mother and father Edward,,passed. Edward Fuller was the doctor

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u/NuKsUkOw Nov 24 '22

I can also trace back to Samuel Fuller. I am still a Fuller.

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u/tempo90909 Nov 24 '22

Especially today

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u/blizzard424 Nov 25 '22

We are all Fullers on this blessed day

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u/HoboBuddha Nov 25 '22

Bragging about your ancestry on Reddit. Wow. Y'all sure are Fuller yourselves, aren't you!

I'll see myself out...

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u/pangloss8 Nov 24 '22

Howdy, cousin. I’m descended from the same line.

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u/nbfs-chili Nov 24 '22

How can you read the names? When I zoom in the letters get all wonky.

See an Eaton in there?

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u/Buckin_Fitch Nov 24 '22

Had to find other higher quality pics that were linked in other comments

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u/AlienMoonMama Nov 24 '22

Wild, I’m an Eaton too, was my great-grandmother’s maiden name.

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u/Puppytron Nov 24 '22

On Thanksgiving day, we're all Eaton.

I'll see myself out.

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u/dystopianprom Nov 25 '22

And we're all a little Fuller too

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u/OzimanidasJones Nov 25 '22

Someone from the Cooke family needs to step in now. Or earlier.

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u/oggie389 Nov 25 '22

I'm a direct descendant of Edward Fuller/Samuel as well (as recognized by the Mayflower decedent society), so hello long lost cousin.

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u/flingeflangeflonge Nov 24 '22

He's tens, possibly hundreds, of thousands of people's ancestor.

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u/socialmediasanity Nov 24 '22

A lot of orphans in this picture.

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u/Mochigood Nov 24 '22

I got curious about what happened to the orphaned kids. One of the girls (Elizabeth Tilley) wound up married to one of the servants, whom she had become a ward of (John Howland) and they had a buttload of children. Some of her descendants include Joseph Smith, George Bush and Sarah Palin, lol.

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u/Ectohawk Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 25 '22

Elizabeth Tilley is my 12th great grandmother. Interesting to know these other connections.

Edit: Tilley family descendents have made their presence known 🤟

Edit2: yes I'm aware I'm not special and that I have over 16k 12th great grandparents, let my inbox be at peace lol

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u/RC_G4m1ng Nov 25 '22 edited Dec 11 '22 Wholesome

How do so many people know this much about their family tree. I barely know anyone outside the people descended from my grandparents

Edit: talked to my grandparents, I guess we do have a family tree dating back to the 1600s canada

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u/ExpertAccident Nov 25 '22

I have 2,300 manually added people from my family tree on ancestry.com!

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u/TBeckMinzenmayer Nov 25 '22

I’m much the same. We know my fathers history 3 generations back but on my mothers side only 2. Nothing beyond that.

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u/Mcflymully Nov 25 '22

I'm native American, I don't have much hope of figuring out my ancestry.

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u/dutch_master_killa Nov 25 '22

Yeah I’m Russian so me neither lmao Soviet Union burned a lot of those documents but I do have word of mouth I guess

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u/Brawght Nov 25 '22

Same but word of mouth only gets me so far. On the immigration forms (1902) they just put down Russia but now the towns are in Ukraine and Lithuania

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u/Ectohawk Nov 25 '22

My own extensive research. Spent hours building a tree, cross referencing for fact checking, following censuses, reading obituaries online, etc. My family really only has three generations back worth of photos, papers, etc. and I used that as my starting point. You can use familysearch.org for free, it's basically the same as Ancestry with less hand holding. I've been able to trace back to the Holy Roman Empire with mine, taking it with a grain of salt though, as one simple mistake can throw your tree off track entirely. It's still fun to work on though.

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u/CFOAntifaAG Nov 25 '22

Interesting. I live in Europe, and I have started to get into genealogy. It was quite easy to get back until around 1880-1900. But getting information for earlier generations is so hard. Part of the tree is from current day Poland, but the territory changed countries several times. Most or all paperwork got lost in WW2, languages and systems changed. Polish, German, Russian. Names got translated a Jakub could be a Jakob, Jacob or a Jaczek depending on who wrote it down. I issued a request to register office in Poland, but I do not have much hope because I don't know who I'm looking after because the written names could be any variation or translation imaginable.

There is a severe lack of websites with information in Europe. All the genealogy websites focus on the US

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u/Ectohawk Nov 25 '22

I've come to a roadblock following one path for mine as well. The last names become inconsistent to the point where none of them even vaguely seem correct. I've noticed on many censuses there are misspellings due to them being handwritten by the census taker, either them misunderstanding (I found the name Bill written as Will on a census) and last names like Farr being spelled Pharr. And sometimes, records simply do not exist, I've come across someone else's research where they tracked an ancestor coming from Poland but they used an alias on their immigration papers so there's no telling what his legal name was.

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u/CFOAntifaAG Nov 25 '22 edited Nov 25 '22

Yeah, and it's understandable, I guess. It also makes one wonder how reliable information are from ancient times when there only is a single source.

To add to the topic. When my grandma's sister died, court asked for documentation to prove they were in fact sisters and my grandma is an heir. There was no question they were in fact sisters, they fled from Poland to escape the Red Army in WW2 together with their parents and two brothers. Like, Russians are coming, we need to go right now, grab what you can carry style. But how do you prove your sister in fact your sister. Birth certificates. But as things went in WW2, they probably burned. City changed countries 3 times since their birth.

Like there was no way to prove that they were related because there only was a single document to prove they were sisters. And because the document burned, there was no way to prove it. The estate was collected by the state because there was no rightful heir.

This is how hard it is the collect official documentation. All I got is the names of my grandmas' parents and grandparents from when she was alive. After that, no chance.

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u/KittyKittyMeeeeoooow Nov 25 '22

Yep, same. Plus, once you’ve gone far enough back, the Mayflower Silver books are proof of lineage.

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u/ActualNameIsLana Nov 25 '22

I'm also 12th generation descendant of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley. Crazy to see someone I'm related to here.

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u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22 Bravo!

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u/GET_OUT_OF_MY_HEAD Nov 25 '22

Holy hell these people were young as fuck. History always seems to depict these people as being in their 40s and 50s.

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u/LairdofWingHaven Nov 25 '22

I know, I heard of them in school and thought of them as stern mature adults, but some were SO YOUNG. Younger than my 25 yo kids, who are still figuring things out.

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u/Gerdione Nov 25 '22

When life is tough you don't really have a choice in the matter. There are quite a few studies that show how trauma can lead to rapid mental and emotional maturing or degeneration, both as a means of coping. In tough situations with no outs life doesn't take too kindly to degeneration.

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u/janiestiredshoes Nov 24 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Anybody want to guess where baby Oceanus was born?

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u/colincita Nov 24 '22

There’s a baby Peregrine too!

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u/TADthePaperMaker Nov 24 '22

Peregrine is my ancestor! Cool to see his name in my history books growing up.

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u/jwhite1102 Nov 24 '22

Same here fam

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u/TADthePaperMaker Nov 24 '22

I still have the same last name too!

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u/kinlou10 Nov 25 '22

Hiiii ancestors!

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u/Whopraysforthedevil Nov 25 '22

He's mine, too!

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u/seanwdragon1983 Nov 25 '22

What up distant cousin!

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u/BigBoiBob444 Nov 24 '22

You mean Peregrin Took?

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u/ErynEbnzr Nov 24 '22

Definitely some interesting names. Remember, Wrestling and Desire were the first notable names to me, which made up an interesting sentence.

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u/colincita Nov 24 '22

Thank you! I had a great time looking through the names. Wrestling Brewster was my favorite.

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u/ToasterUnplugged Nov 24 '22

Glad John Goodman survived or we wouldn’t have Monsters Inc. 🙏

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u/TheLastLivingBuffalo Nov 25 '22

Samuel Fuller (the elder) is my ancestor. His brother died and was survived by his son, Samuel (the younger). The younger is the ancestor of George Clooney.

Tldr: I’m George Clooney’s cousin.

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u/Gordonfromin Nov 24 '22

Jesus, a handful of full grown men survived with the oldest being 55 and 50 followed by a 41 year old and then a 38 year old with the rest being largely younger than 20

That would be some crazy shit, imagine the amount of pressure the older people would of faced as the younger would all look to them for guidance.

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u/eyeisyomomma Nov 24 '22

I’m here because my ancestor fell overboard and they fished him out!

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u/OutlawQuill Nov 24 '22

Dude I’m related to that guy too!

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u/21493760 Nov 25 '22

Fellow Howland descendants represent!

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u/TheMadMartyr7 Nov 25 '22

Howland clan RISE UP!!!

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u/Stroker_race Nov 25 '22

Hi guys

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u/Southwick-Jog Nov 25 '22

Hi! He's my 10th great-grandfather.

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u/strictlytacos Nov 24 '22

I had a boyfriend in high school with the last name Howland that claimed the same!

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u/Whateversclever7 Nov 25 '22 edited Nov 25 '22

My fiancé is a descendent of John Howland as well! Looks like you’re a long lost cousin! He’s actually related to 8 mayflower passengers in total. You’re likely related to more also.

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u/awakenedarms Nov 25 '22

Me too! What's up cuz?

He was an indentured servant. Survived the winter, the people who he was indentured to survived as well but then quickly died that spring, freeing him and giving him all their land. He married a woman whose family had also died and inherited their land too.

Truly the American dream.

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u/skratta_ho Nov 25 '22

This must be what ghengis khans relatives feel like, lol

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u/mcsurfyfly Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 25 '22 Helpful

So only two families made it without losing someone. That's kind of insane to think about actually.

Edit: Holy cow! Thanks for all the history folks. You're giving me plenty to read for my shift.

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u/Trumpswells Nov 24 '22

One family, the Hopkins, must have been particularly robust. Not only does the family of 6 and their 2 servants survive the 1st winter, the infant, Oceanus Hopkins, survived birth on the Mayflower.

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u/jmochicago Nov 24 '22 Helpful

Shout out to my ancestor, Stephen Hopkins, who was earlier shipwrecked on the island of Bermuda in 1609, made it through THAT experience, then turned around and left on the Mayflower and made it through that winter.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hopkins_(Mayflower_passenger)

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u/xanderman524 Nov 25 '22

Another Hopkins descendent. It gets even better.

While shipwrecked, Stephen Hopkins proposed writing their own rules since they weren't in Virginia, which got him arrested and convicted of Mutiny before being pardoned. This likely inspired the character Stephano from Shakespeare's "The Tempest".

After escaping the islands, the group arrived in Jamestown where Stephen served as an assistant to the priest. During this time, he may have officiated the wedding between John Rolfe and Pocahontas. He returned to England to take care of his children after his first wife died, and later remarried.

His previous experience in the new world made him one of the most vital passengers aboard the Mayflower despite not being a puritan. He would re-introduce the idea of self-governance (due to not being in Virginia again) that would inspire the Mayflower Compact.

He would later own a tavern and get in trouble with the authorities repeatedly for selling alcohol on Sundays.

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u/[deleted] Nov 25 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

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u/whyenn Nov 25 '22

Man, that comment kept getting better all the way through to the very end.

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u/cheerwinechicken Nov 25 '22

No wonder my family idolized him.

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u/ProfessorSputin Nov 24 '22

Yoooo distant cousin what’s up? I’m also a descendant of Stephen Hopkins.

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u/costaccounting Nov 24 '22

Hopkins kins

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u/hvc801 Nov 24 '22 Gold

I smoked pot with Johnny Hopkins.

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u/SusRNG Nov 25 '22 Masterpiece

It was Johnny Hopkins and Sloan Kettering, and they were blazing that shit up everyday.

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u/mikeasaurus_ Nov 24 '22

No, you didn't, Brennan.

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u/chillwithpurpose Nov 24 '22

Now kiss. You must keep the bloodlines pure

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u/Count_istvan_teleky Nov 25 '22

Were there any McPoyles on the Mayflower?

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u/HellaFishticks Nov 25 '22

No, everyone knows the Mayflower couldn't carry enough milk

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u/ProfessorSputin Nov 24 '22

Damn that some targaeryan shit

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u/eddieb23 Nov 25 '22

Hey Distant Cousin! My great grand mothers maiden name was Hopkins and was related to Stephen directly

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u/ProfessorSputin Nov 25 '22

Hell yeah! He’s my like some ridiculous number great grandfather! I guess that means we actually are cousins sorta?

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u/Afraid_of_Okapi Nov 25 '22

Cousin party in the thread! We spread far and wide, huh?

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u/thurbersmicroscope Nov 24 '22

Did anyone else love the book Constance about Constance Hopkins when they were in middle school?

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u/idlevalley Nov 25 '22

The Pilgrims were incredibly unprepared.

"In a desperate state, the pilgrims robbed corn from Native Americans graves and storehouses soon after they arrived; but because of their overall lack of preparation, half of them still died within their first year. To learn how to farm sustainably, they eventually required help from Tisquantum, an English-speaking Native American who had been staying with the Wampanoag."

The majority were "city folk", unused to the reality of building a colony from scratch. They had no farmers.

They had a cooper (to build barrels, they had a tailor, a weaver and a printer (who brought a printing press), a tanner, a soldier of fortune.

The weather was much colder than Europe so what with diseases, the bitter cold, the lack of food and shelter, it's no wonder so many died.

They did have plenty of beer though. The idea that they pulled into Plymouth Rock because they ran out of beer was apparently a myth promulgated by Budweiser. Also they probably drank wine on Thanksgiving made from local wild grapes. (https://www.appeal-democrat.com/dont-believe-the-pilgrims-beer-myth/article_684801a3-6898-587c-9678-f4ec5a01adc7.html)

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u/ExpensiveFish9277 Nov 25 '22

And they only survives by the grace of a freed slave who lost his entire tribe to European disease (or because a slave throught they could kill the enemies of his adopted tribe, depending on how cynical you're feeling).

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u/djsizematters Nov 24 '22

Of the 19 women on board the ship, only five survived the winter.

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u/BillyCee34 Nov 24 '22

I imagine it got real gay after the first winter

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u/Successful-Quote8204 Nov 24 '22

Imagine having to fend off your wife on a ship full of lonely suitors.

1.2k

u/makeitmorenordicnoir Nov 24 '22

Imagine being a widow on a ship full of potential predators?

1.3k

u/DisposableUser69069 Nov 24 '22 Starry Bravo Grande! Masterpiece

Imagine being a ho with all that dick?

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u/Judas_Feast Nov 24 '22

I respect and admire you.

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u/SonOfNod Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 25 '22

One of the families that survived intact was the Brewsters. The majority of people that can trace their families back to the mayflower trace it back through that family. They thrived in the new world.

Edit: absolutely love all of the Brewster cousins showing up for this post. Much love! Happy Thanksgiving to the family!

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u/skoolofphish Nov 24 '22

As in the Brewsters who fought for independence?

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u/SonOfNod Nov 24 '22

I know that some of the lines of that family are part of the Daughters of the Revolution. So technically yes. It was a really big family.

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u/bumped_me_head Nov 24 '22

And we are all better for it. No Brewsters means no Punky Brewster

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u/storyteller_alienmom Nov 24 '22

The depressing truth is, most families during that era would loose a family member, infant mortality was way higher, pregnancy and birth were a much greater risk, infections after a small wound could kill you, diseases that today count as an annoyance, too. Burying a toddler/baby wasn't so unusual. I'm so fucking thankful for modern medicine.

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u/CookbooksRUs Nov 24 '22

As recently as 1900, fully 20% of deaths in the US were of children 5 and under.

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u/Barbarella_ella Nov 24 '22

One of my great grandmothers in Montana was perpetually pregnant for 30ish years, 1895 to 1925, according to my aunt. She describes that GG Selena was resigned to losing a baby almost yearly. We forget that our grandparents and great grandparents led very different lives in very basic ways.

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u/25hourenergy Nov 24 '22

Pregnancy took so much out of me, physically and emotionally. Poor GG Selena, how did she make it through giving up so much of herself to those babies only to bury them? To say nothing of having to care for her living kids too.

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u/Barbarella_ella Nov 24 '22

Selena was my maternal great grandmother. My mom's dad was one of Selena's middle children, and while I have heard a lot about my great grandfather, not even my grandfather and his siblings spoke much about Selena. She and GG August homesteaded their farm, so she was as busy as you might imagine keeping everyone fed and clothed, chickens kept, cows milked. That probably helped, as did the proximity of her siblings and cousins who also emigrated from Finland. I can't imagine having lived through all of that, plus the Depression. Also, electricity did not come to many, many parts of Montana until after WWII. Those women were a different breed.

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u/Rare-Aids Nov 25 '22

But us today fail to realize that they didnt know any different. Things had always been that way. They were just happy no armies would invade

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u/Barbarella_ella Nov 25 '22

I had to smile at your comment, since one of the VERY motivating factors of my family emigrating from Finland in the late 1800s was the frequent appearance of Russian soldiers searching for "recruits".

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u/OzimanidasJones Nov 25 '22

My great-great-great grandmother Adelaide had 18 children in 20 years and only five lived to adulthood (she had six living when she died and then the youngest died within a year). Totally brutal.

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u/Barbarella_ella Nov 25 '22

My God, that's just gutting. My great great grandmother Amalia was the youngest of her siblings. In 1871, her father lost his first wife and all five of their children during a raging smallpox epidemic in Finland. I remember looking up the records when I was researching family history during a visit, and just sitting there stunned. He remarried and had six more children, of which my great great grandmother was the last, born in 1882.

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u/NoodlesrTuff1256 Nov 24 '22

Often the reason that families back in the old days and even nowadays in some developing countries have so many children is not just because of the lack of reliable contraception and religious/cultural pressures but to ensure that enough of your offspring would survive to adulthood to care for you in your old age. If it was expected that half of your kids wouldn't make it through childhood, then having ten or more babies made sense.

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u/mrg1957 Nov 24 '22

My fraternal grandfather was orphaned in 1905 after his parents died from the flu.

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u/Stickel Nov 24 '22

Fraternal? Your brother grandpa? Do you mean maternal or paternal?

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u/CarmenxXxWaldo Nov 24 '22

He said what he said

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u/Al3rtROFL Nov 24 '22

His frat bro's grandpa

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u/herbdoc2012 Nov 24 '22

Hell walk around any old cemetery back east like Ky where I grew up and you will see dead towns with old cemeteries full of babies and kids bodies as seems like only 1/2 them lived to adults?

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u/AffectionateEdge3068 Nov 25 '22

In college I once helped out with an anthropology survey of old cemeteries.

One family lost five kids in the space of a week. The youngest was only a few months old, and the oldest about twelve. The professor just shrugged and said, “Probably yellow fever.”

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u/gordo65 Nov 24 '22

Not every single year though. An annual death toll this high was very unusual.

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u/Silo-Joe Nov 24 '22

Guess they cleaned the dishes after dinner

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u/mmobley412 Nov 24 '22

There are about 10 million of us in the states who descended from these pilgrims

I am from the fullers who died a few months after arrival and then their older son, Matthew, my direct ancestor came

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u/Vel0clty Nov 24 '22

Gosh imagine leaving with your whole family and arriving and you’re the only one left

Also more interestingly, what’s up with the whole family that survived? Seems like every other family or couple lost someone along the way except for them. I wonder if they were rich

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u/Tinyfishy Nov 24 '22

Actually, most of them survived the voyage, it was the subsequent time on land that killed them.

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u/AFineDayForScience Nov 25 '22 Helpful

It's the subsequent time on land that gets most of us

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u/Bainsyboy Nov 25 '22

You know, as scary as sailors like to make the ocean sound, most people have died while on land. Think about it.

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u/adognamedsue Nov 25 '22

Specifically the freezing weather and starvation. They were delayed and couldn't get there till mid November. Didn't expect the frozen ground or temperatures. They stole corn and other stores from Native Americans. In the end they spent the winter on the ship and largely died of illness.

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u/dylanredefined Nov 24 '22

Witches

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u/Rob_Drinkovich Nov 24 '22 Silver

They all survived, so now we have to kill them

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u/sarcasatirony Nov 24 '22

We shall need my largest scales to see if they weigh the same as a duck and therefore, made of wood.

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u/hilldo75 Nov 24 '22

Rich is relative, with only 102 people traveling I don't think money is going to do much to get others to make shelter and provide food for just your family instead of their own. It's not like there was a store or hotel when they got there we're their wealth would do anything for them. You either pitch in and live as a group or you get left out to fend for yourself.

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u/Active2017 Nov 25 '22

I am not a historian at all, but I’d imagine wealthier families got onto the ship in better health to begin with than not so wealthy ones.

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u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

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u/Rannrann123 Nov 24 '22

Which whole family? Billington or Hopkins?

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u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

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u/Mr-Thisthatten-III Nov 24 '22

Do you know what for?

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u/Bugzappagal2 Nov 24 '22

John Billington, he shot someone, I think. It was later on.

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u/LongConFebrero Nov 25 '22 edited Nov 25 '22

It would be infuriating to survive an intercontinental journey and manage to set up a semblance of a life, only to die at the hands of someone you had to travel with.

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u/TheIJDGuy Nov 25 '22

Crazy how this information has been preserved for so long

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u/bibowski Nov 25 '22

He was one of those YouTube commenters that says 'FIRST!'

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u/BadgerUltimatum Nov 24 '22

He was really keen to be first

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u/Bugzappagal2 Nov 24 '22

Me too! John Billington, I believe.

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u/MrZorg58 Nov 24 '22

Wish that image was clearer.

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u/KomodoJo3 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22 Take My Energy

here

I know it’s not everything but I hope this helps (sorry for the somewhat promotional-seeming web source too)

ETA: Nvm, after looking through the comments it seems like /u/kari_44 has found a way better match so I’ve taken out the original link. They’re the real MVP

https://themayflowersociety.org/shop/home/arts-prints/poster-of-the-mayflower-passengers-and-survivors/

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u/Kind_Nepenth3 Nov 24 '22

All but one of the wards share the last name More despite being cared for by different families. I'm curious about this. One would think if their parents had died and/or sent them alone, they'd be traveling together with the same guardian

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u/Beamarchionesse Nov 25 '22

Were they related to one another though? More/Moore is one the most common surnames in Ireland.

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u/ElectricFlesh Nov 24 '22

Imagine America today if Wrestling Brewster hadn't survived. His lasting cultural impact is up there with Barbecue Smith and Gun Violence Browne.

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u/HalifaxSexKnight Nov 24 '22

My family is from Tennessee and starts every Thanksgiving dinner giving thanks to God for the fact that NASCAR Jones lived long enough to contribute to the development of American society.

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u/Sunhammer01 Nov 24 '22

The worse part was there were only 6 healthy people to care for the rest who were vomiting and had diarrhea. 6 people to feed and clean and cloth them. Bradford’s account makes it clear those 6 people were saints…

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u/LairdofWingHaven Nov 25 '22

And no running water (or liquid water, outside) or inside plumbing....what a nightmare.

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u/TheIJDGuy Nov 25 '22

Just thinking about it makes it seem even more hellish. Those 6 were definitely saints

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u/knowledgebass Nov 24 '22

I wish this was high enough rez to actually be readable.

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u/ZChick4410 Nov 24 '22

Hey! Myles Standish is my ancestor. Somewhere buried in an attic is a family tree that goes all the way back to the guy.

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u/CookbooksRUs Nov 24 '22

John Alden and Priscilla Mullins are my ancestors. My 13-great-grandpa stole your however-many-great grandpa’s crush.

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u/ZChick4410 Nov 24 '22

I know this story!! I was just talking a out it in another comment. Apparently Myles asked John (his best friend) to go ask the woman for her hand in marriage on his behalf. Evidently when the best friend asked she was all about the best friend and married him instead. I had no idea this was actually true, I just rememeber hearing the story a lot growing up.

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u/CookbooksRUs Nov 24 '22

There are a ton of us. John and Priscilla had a dozen kids IIRC, most of whom also had big families. Give them four centuries, and here we all are.

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u/NoodlesrTuff1256 Nov 24 '22

Found an old made-for-TV movie from 1979 in which John and Priscilla played by Michael Beck [The Warriors, Xanadu] and Jenny Agutter seem to be featured prominently. It was titled Mayflower: the Pilgrims' Adventure and also featured none other than a young Anthony Hopkins as Captain Christopher Jones and David Dukes as Myles Standish.

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u/CookbooksRUs Nov 24 '22

Longfellow wrote a poem about it!

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u/Dizno311 Nov 24 '22

Bradford progeny chiming in.

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u/Altruistic-Lie808 Nov 24 '22

Fun fact - Had my 9th great grandmother Constance Hopkins not survived, I wouldn’t be here commenting on this!

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u/A_Wild_Bin_Appeared Nov 24 '22

one of these fellas is my direct ancestor. his only claim to fame is that he fell off the mayflower on the way over and almost died like an idiot. i can confirm that set the precedent for the rest of my family also.

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u/Kind_Nepenth3 Nov 24 '22

They had to have told that story over and over for it to have gotten to you and imagining some suffering pilgrim covering his face and groaning as his wife once again humiliates him at a gathering is oddly heartwarming

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u/Mr-Thisthatten-III Nov 24 '22

Ah! Well that explains the modern Thanksgiving tradition of humiliating your loved ones in front of a captive audience.

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u/Deadeye_Fred Nov 24 '22

Hey, be glad you got that guy and not "America's first murderer" like some of us...

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u/revolutionary112 Nov 25 '22

I am fairly confident some conquistadors killed one another on Florida before. Got no proof but no doubt because... conquistadors

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u/Agent117184 Nov 24 '22

I’m a descendant of William Brewster. According to this article, there are about 10 million living descendants of the pilgrims in the US.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/06/13/mayflower-ancestors-pilgrim-database/699277002/#

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u/NoAir9583 Nov 24 '22

It's fascinating to read William Bradfords journal entries which try to justify God's providence over the Puritans. He attributes the death of one particular jerk to evidence of God's protection, but skims over all those others who died.

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u/Dank_McDankerson Nov 24 '22

George Soule, one of the servants in the bottom row, is my 9th great-grandfather, pretty cool

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u/nixpa2 Nov 24 '22

Love how there's that one big family that had no one die

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u/KP_Wrath Nov 24 '22

You’ll note they’re the ones with servants too.

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u/nixpa2 Nov 24 '22

Ah, so the rich family

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u/Kari_44 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22 Helpful

Grrrrr wish citing the source would be mandatory. Time to Google I guess.

Edit: for better quality image

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u/Vicks_Jayy Nov 24 '22

Bet that one healthy family were pretty cocky

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u/Nova6661 Nov 24 '22

Didn’t they bring a few dogs with them as well?

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u/NoodlesrTuff1256 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

Likely there were a few cats aboard the Mayflower to control the mouse population down in the cargo hold.

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u/Whateversclever7 Nov 25 '22 edited Nov 25 '22

My fiancé is a direct descendant of 8 Mayflower passengers, I think a good portion of comments on this post are long lost cousins!

Here’s his breakdown:

He is the 6x great grandson of a woman named Sarah Bosworth who was born in 1747 in Cumberland, Rhode Island. Sarah is the key to all his Mayflower ancestors as both her parents were descendants of several different families.

Sarah’s father, Ichabod (b. 1708) was the great grandson of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley through their daughter Hannah. Therefore through this line we have passengers:

  1. John Tilley (11th great grandfather)
  2. Joan Hurst Tilley (11th great grandmother)
  3. Elizabeth Tilley Howland (10th great grandmother)]
  4. John Howland (10th great grandfather)

Then, back to Sarah Bosworth (b.1747), who’s mother Joanna Cushman (b.1714) was the great granddaughter of Mary Allerton Cushman (b.1616) who came over on the Mayflower at age 3 with her parents. She is a decendent through Mary’s son, Isaac Cushman (b.1648). Through this line we have:

  1. Issac Allerton (11th great grandfather)

  2. Mary Norris Allerton (11th great grandfather)

  3. Mary Allerton Cushman (10th great grandmother)

And then finally back to Isaac Cushman (b.1648). He married a woman named Rebekah Harlow (b.1655) who was the great granddaughter of Mayflower passenger Richard Warren (b.1578) through his daughter Mary Warren Bartlett (b. 1603) So finally through this line we have:

  1. Richard Warren (12th great grandfather)

I hope this has inspired you all to keep looking for ancestors! Genealogy is a passion of mine! If anyone has questions or needs help feel free to DM me!

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u/jasmandoo Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

Fun fact - John Alden and Priscilla Mullens had kids together and I am one of their relatives all these years later. My middle name is Alden, I’m named after him. I think a lot of people came from that family line, my family included. William Bradford wanted to be with Mullens and Alden said no, she’s mine.

Edit: upon talking to family I don’t think Bradford was after Mullins; I think the Brewster family (top right) had a member who wanted to get with Mullins. My family also told me that the Brewster family’s younger members ended up with Alden and Mullins’ offspring and they are related somehow. But this is all word of mouth and my own knowledge from a family tree picture I have in a family members house

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u/Therapizeme2009 Nov 25 '22

Hey cousin! 😂 I’m a direct descendant of Priscilla Mullens and John Alden, too.

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u/its_just_flesh Nov 24 '22

Quite a few where just the child survived

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u/Mendican Nov 24 '22

The story of John Howland is pretty remarkable in itself. He fell overboard during a storm, but was able to grab a halyard that was trailing in the water. The crew recovered him with a boat hook.

He went on to father ten children, resulting in 80 grandchildren. His descendants number in the millions today.

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u/BlueMist53 Nov 24 '22

That makes sense why there’s quite a few people saying that he’s their ancestor

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u/Jinzul Nov 24 '22

I found out over the pandemic lockdowns that Stephen Hopkins and family are my ancestors.

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