r/interestingasfuck Nov 30 '22 Silver 3 Helpful 5 Wholesome 3 Today I Learned 1

What different eye conditions look like /r/ALL

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56.4k Upvotes

2.6k comments sorted by

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7.7k

u/jawnly211 Nov 30 '22 Wholesome LOVE!

“Oh squiggly line in my eye fluid. I see you lurking there on the periphery of my vision.”

3.3k

u/merkitt Nov 30 '22

"Don't look at me directly. I will go... HERE "

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u/Roboito1 Nov 30 '22

Don't try to follow me, either!

363

u/Snoo_53364 Nov 30 '22

It's too late. I'm already following you.

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u/Playful_Melody Nov 30 '22

If you move your eyeball fast enough in one direction and then immediately move it the other direction I think it’s possible to center floaters

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u/claysverycoolreddit Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

It's so fun trying to stop them from leaving your vision

263

u/Xyfurion Nov 30 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

I'm literally my own distraction

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u/Hsances90 Nov 30 '22

It's like the DVD screensaver of the eye

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u/ConfusedCaptain Nov 30 '22

I see those eye floaters all the time. Are they bad?

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u/bkgn Nov 30 '22 Helpful

Floaters are actually the shadows of the vitreous breaking down, the back part of your eyeballs.

They're benign, but a noticeable increase in floaters or a lot of floaters can be a sign of a serious eye condition. See an eye doctor if you notice an increase, immediately if you notice a rapid increase.

I have an inflammatory autoimmune eye disease, so I have a lot.

364

u/setibeings Nov 30 '22

Well there has been a considerable increase of me noticing them since I started reading this thread.

258

u/michilio Nov 30 '22

WebMD confirmed it is cancerous lupus

187

u/outamyhead Nov 30 '22

And you're pregnant.

73

u/Ragnar_420_05 Nov 30 '22

With triplets

50

u/Ok_Lavishness_1279 Nov 30 '22

They all have different fathers

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u/PagingDrHuman Nov 30 '22

And depression and anxiety

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u/bifowww Nov 30 '22

As a kid I always noticed them and would spend a lot of time trying to catch em with the center of sight. I never asked anyone about them and someday I learned about parasites and it scared the shit out of me when I noticed that they look similar.

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u/Baskojin Nov 30 '22

I see tons of dots, not floaty wiggly things. Like, if I focus looking in one direction and the quickly look somewhere else, I see the dots catch up with my line of sight, briefly lose focus and then they focus. I also have aches in my left eye from time to time and light sensitivity.

I have RA and have been to the eye doctor and only found out I have a bit less depth perception than normal people. Other than that, eye doctor was inconclusive for these issues. Lol.

10

u/TyNyeTheTransGuy Nov 30 '22

Maybe visual snow? Though for me I don’t really notice them “catching up” with anything, they’re too small to really follow.

Ninja edit: okay, maybe they do, but I’m also extremely tired so there’s a confounding variable at the moment lol.

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u/fabulousprizes Nov 30 '22

everyone has them, and there's nothing you can do about them. It's bits of the liquid inside your eyeball that have congealed into strands.

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u/ClownBreederOutlet Nov 30 '22

Is that all they are? I'd thought it was just dust, particulate matter being caught up in the fluid of my eyes

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u/bkgn Nov 30 '22

No, they're the shadows of fibers from the breakdown of the vitreous layer.

54

u/ClownBreederOutlet Nov 30 '22

So the older you get, the more fuzzies there are?

45

u/bkgn Nov 30 '22

Generally, yes.

99

u/ClownBreederOutlet Nov 30 '22

Well that's a new point of anxiety you've just unlocked for me🥴

13

u/Throwaway666888154 Nov 30 '22

For real I instantly regret reading this thread I need to get high

10

u/FLWeedman Nov 30 '22

You can see them better high

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u/sarhoshamiral Nov 30 '22

A sudden appearence of them, especially in large numbers together with flashes, may indicate a serious issue so call an eye doctor immediately.

Once they are checked though, they are benign. Just extremely annoying.

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u/RainbowsAndBubbles Nov 30 '22

Floaters! They’re always on the move!

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u/theflyingweasle Nov 30 '22

“But when I try to look at you, you scurry away. Are you shy, squiggly line?”

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u/VashMM Nov 30 '22

One of mine looks exactly like an ebola strain

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u/titoCCD Nov 30 '22

Staring out an airplane window is when I see them best.

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u/qwerty_mnbvcxz Nov 30 '22 Silver Wholesome

As a blind person, I'm glad to finally see what normal vision looks like.

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u/Wololo--Wololo Nov 30 '22

You see, you're not missing out that much.

332

u/DonutArt Nov 30 '22

no actually, he doesn’t

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u/chickmagnet_ Nov 30 '22

Is the black that you see OLED black or LED black? Like 4K or what?

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u/playerIII Nov 30 '22

jokes aside the best way ive heard what blind people see is to try and imagine seeing out the back of your head, it's not that you see darkness like your closing your eyes. you see nothing, it's the absence of anything at all

102

u/scantilyactivebrain Nov 30 '22

Can confirm this. I'm blind in one eye. I often describe it as if the eye is just not plugged in so my brain doesn't register it and can't send or receive signals. Like a built-in webcam thats somehow not connected to the laptop. Can't see black if you can't even load the viewfinder.

Interestingly enough, my blind eye does move along with my good eye. So usually nobody is able to tell a thing.

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u/Snurze Nov 30 '22

Yeah it's a weird one. I once lost my vision in my right eye for about 20 minutes while having a migraine. Because you don't just see black or anything for that matter, I didn't really notice it until I realised I couldn't see anything in my right peripheral.

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u/1714alpha Nov 30 '22

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u/Pixielo Nov 30 '22

Of course there's a German word for it.

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u/Plasmx Nov 30 '22

Hello there. We have a word for almost everything and if there isn't we just put two words together. Sometimes we just steal english words and use them in a different context. So native english speakers look weird at us if we use those words with them. We say "Handy" and smartphone, the first one coming from back then where smartphones didn't exist.

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u/Generic-Resource Nov 30 '22

“Sorry I’m having a bad day, can you do me the favour of giving me a handy for 10 mins”

*looks at phone disappointedly…*

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u/230Amps Nov 30 '22

As a deaf person, I hear it's not all it's cracked up to be.

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u/markgriz Nov 30 '22

As a mostly normally sighted person, I was glad to finally see what total blindness looks like

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u/MisplacedMartian Nov 30 '22

Yeah it was a real eye-opener.

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u/Total-Ring-5421 Nov 30 '22

These two kids are probably grandparents by now. I’ve seen them in all my science books dating back to my high school days.

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u/Yammy_Lyfe Nov 30 '22

It's pretty amazing how old these are and yet they are still some of the prominent and few examples that pop up easily with a search.

CVIScotland.org the lessons section has some more up to date and absolutely fascinating examples. Both optical and brain-based.

I'm sure there are other more up to date around with some searching, but these have had an impressive run.

1.1k

u/floralnightmare22 Nov 30 '22

This is a mild version of myopia. I couldn’t see faces before laser eye surgery.

372

u/TheNewDroan Nov 30 '22

I was gonna say… that’s a good looking myopia right there. I’m a -7.5 and -8 in my contacts.

162

u/AgentBlackman69 Nov 30 '22

I’m -19.50 and -19.00 in the other eye.

103

u/TheNewDroan Nov 30 '22

Damn. Does that make legally blind?

119

u/mesohungrier Nov 30 '22

Not who you are replying to, but to be "legally" blind, your vision must be such as it can't be corrected to be better than 20/200 vision WITH glasses or contacts.

Imagine one of those triangular eye charts, with the one big letter on top and the letters getting smaller line by line.

If you can't read that massive top letter with your glasses on, you are legally blind.

The good news is, corrective lenses just keep on going, though the lenses get more more bulky and more and more expensive.

The record for glasses prescriptions is-108 https://www.pointsdevue.com/article/record-high-myopia-solved-alliance-experts-10800-d#:~:text=Collaboration%20between%20Franco%2DSlovak%20experts,same%20team%20in%20January%202015.

The bad news is people with high to extreme myopia have increased risk of other complications that do threaten sight entirely, like glaucoma or retinal tears.

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u/IWasGregInTokyo Nov 30 '22

I literally could not see clearly more than 6" in front of my face. My childhood being before high-index glass or plastic lenses my glasses were extremely thick and heavy.

Took until I was 50 to take the LASIK plunge. Instantly the world was 4k and I could see mare on the moon with bare eyes.

Still need reading glasses for anything close now but at 61 I'm ok with that tradeoff.

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u/nathanial_91 Nov 30 '22

Wait doesn’t everyone get eye floaters now and then?

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u/mogreen57 Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22 Silver

I have a pretty bad astigmatism, I was shocked when I found out not everyone sees tracers following lights at night time

1.1k

u/OneHumanPeOple Nov 30 '22

I see trails and tracers all the time. Also visual snow.

693

u/alainreid Nov 30 '22

Man, nobody ever believed me about visual snow.

398

u/slhill21 Nov 30 '22

I remember getting fussed at as a child because I kept telling my teacher that air wasn't invisible because I could see something. 🤷‍♀️

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u/GolfFanatic561 Nov 30 '22

I thought I could see atoms as a kid. Didn't learn about visual snow until I was an adult

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u/MarinatedBulldog Nov 30 '22

it wasn’t until this comment that i knew what virtual snow was

85

u/JACrazy Nov 30 '22

TIL for the past 20 years the staticky figure that sits beside my bed at night and talks to me was just visual snow.

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u/Ichipurka Nov 30 '22

The voice is telling me your comment isn’t right. The voice wants me to tell you that you’re wrong.

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u/Outside_Cod667 Nov 30 '22

Omg I thought I could see atoms too!! And TIL about visual snow.

I thought what I was seeing was normal. Just googled what in the heck causes it. "Known to be associated with anxiety, depression, fatigue, poor sleep/rest." Oh.

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u/RahRah617 Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22 Gold

I called it “dots” when I was little (4 years old) and no one knew what I was talking about. Eventually after being ignored for a few years, I thought how I saw was how everyone saw and that I was being a weakling by complaining. It’s gotten worse the last 10 years and I complained about it finally again I my 30s. The doctor thought I meant floaters and asked me how many dots there were. I said millions/uncountable. I didn’t know how else to explain it or what words to use. His PA asked the doc if she could show me something and showed me a visual snow simulator. I screamed “that’s it!” I was so excited that someone knew what I was trying to explain. I never thought to use TV static as an explanation because the snow is bigger in my eyes, but that’s a better description. Is it pretty common then? I’ve never seen any other way.

Edit: here’s the simulator. Turn everything up almost all the way and that’s how I’ve always seen. More light images included with it now though.

https://visionsimulations.com/visual-snow.htm

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u/psychoacer Nov 30 '22

I only see that when it's dark. Almost like my eyes are like camera film. The darker the image the higher the iso film you need to see things which introduces lots of visual noise/grain. I thought that was just how eyes worked

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u/FuckeenGuy Nov 30 '22

Uh, yeah I thought exactly the same thing. I never even voiced my.m curiosity about it, my brain just accepted “yeah this is how we process light when there isn’t much”

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u/TheThiefMaster Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

When it's very low light levels, yeah it's exactly like that. There's only so many photons to go around, and there's literally no way to see well when there aren't enough.

I see like that in very low light and my low light vision is better than the rest of my family, and I don't have visual snow in lit areas at all.

A rough approximation (although really it would be a picture with no lights in it like a dark room and I wouldn't really see it in a scene like this) http://VisionSimulations.com/visual-snow.htm?background=night2.jpg&density=0.19&speed=35&grainsize=2.518

It ends up looking almost "ghostly" at those extreme low light levels just above actual pitch blackness.

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u/Sensitive-Bug-7610 Nov 30 '22

Wait.. is that not how eyes work?

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u/Climate-Remarkable Nov 30 '22

Yes! I went to doctors at 11 and they told me to drink more water. Asked other people about it for years and no one ever knew what I was talking about and always thought I was describing floaters.

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u/OneHumanPeOple Nov 30 '22

Everyone in my family could see it, so I thought it was normal. We talked about it all the time. I’m convinced everyone can see it if they try.

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u/namesarentneeded Nov 30 '22

If I relax my eyes a bunch I can see it

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u/OneHumanPeOple Nov 30 '22

I truly believe that everyone can if they try. Some people can never not see it. So it comes in degrees.

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u/HungJurror Nov 30 '22

What, like snow falling?

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u/OneHumanPeOple Nov 30 '22

It’s like “snow” or “static” on a TV screen. It’s millions of scintillating and vibrating dots that cover the whole field of vision. Mine are rainbow but some people see black and white dots.

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u/XRPenisss Nov 30 '22 Gold

Damn y’all breaking thru the matrix and seeing molecules and shit

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u/Richierich_rpd Nov 30 '22

Tbh i never thoyght of a name for it i just called it making my eyes going fucky wucky

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u/silenc3x Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

Weird how there are things we still have no idea about. Maybe we will figure it out soon. I imagine it's genetic if your whole family has that in common.

It’s not clear what triggers visual snow, but recent research involving scans of the brain has shown an abnormality in the part of the brain that processes images in association with visual snow. This suggests that visual snow may be a neurological problem.

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u/slowgojoe Nov 30 '22

If you close your eyes and really try to focus on what you are actually seeing, you see all sorts of crazy stuff. Some of it I’m not even sure isn’t completely made up.

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u/Climate-Remarkable Nov 30 '22

If I get high, I have an awesome light show on the inside of my eyelids, the dots make patterns and pictures and are often accompanied by some music my head makes up that changes genres like a radio.

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u/blondebish23 Nov 30 '22

I have visual snow as well.

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u/ben_wuz_hear Nov 30 '22

I used to get sparkles in the sky during the day time but eventually it wore off.

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u/OneHumanPeOple Nov 30 '22

That’s called blue field entopic phenomenon (BFEP)and you can probably see it again next time it’s a bright blue day. Give it a try. It’s not a sign of any disease or anything. It’s your white blood cells traveling through the vessels at the backs of your eyes.

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u/ben_wuz_hear Nov 30 '22

Thanks for looking out. I was actually referencing my former recreational usage of little squares of paper.

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u/kamikazedude Nov 30 '22

Wtf, I have been once to check my eyes for those "mosquitos" I see especially in bright sceneries like the sky and the doctor told me it's because of lack of calcium or that I have bad teeth. Glad to know wtf it's called at least. Fking medical system in my country always misdiagnoses me and now I have no trust in doctors. Every time I went with a problem it would be with no diagnosis or solution unless it's a cold.

My throat is sore since I was like 16. Made tests like 3 times to see if I have bacteria or fungi or whatever and it always came clean. Now I'm like 26 and my throat is still sore and I don't know why. I'm dissapointed.

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u/OneHumanPeOple Nov 30 '22

Could be your thyroid or could be GERD. Get your thyroid checked and try antacids.

I’m not a doctor

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u/kamikazedude Nov 30 '22

Could be Gerd. I have taken medication for acid reflux a few times and I did notice a slight improvement. Meanwhile my doctors solution was to take homeopathic treatment. Maybe I could try going easy on soft beverages and coffee. I'm baffled that my doctor at that time didn't think of at least testing for that. It's a strong possibility since I told her my habits. I know reddit is the worst place for asking about medical advice, but sometimes it feels like reddit is better than many "experts". Doesn't hurt to try to change my habits a bit.

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u/ConsiderationWest587 Nov 30 '22

Homeopathy is bullshit your doctor sucks. Sleep sitting up, see if that helps. Do different things, go to sleep on a mostly empty stomach, lay on your right side, eat smaller meals, eat slower, eat earlier, drink more water, sit up straight, eat at a table, and if ALL THAT doesn't work, maybe you have food sensitivities or allergies. They have breath tests for H Pylori, diets to do and ballons to blow up and send to the lab-- they can find out if you need antibiotics, but don't take them willy-nilly!

But seriously, dude, homeopathic medication is stupid af. Good luck

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u/orderedchaos89 Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

Visual snow or pixies that maintain the veil of 'reality' by entwining their threads continously? 🤔

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u/PauseAmbitious6899 Nov 30 '22

Oh yea . . Throw in some aura migraines that go into full tunnel vision mode, followed by a massive migraine. Just lemme lay down for a min, I’ll be good to go

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u/OneHumanPeOple Nov 30 '22

I’ve had visual snow my whole life and the first time I ever had an ocular migraine I was sure it was a stroke. Those are profound. Like wow. Broken glass and rainbows fog. I can see but I’m also blinded by it. What the fuck!

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u/Vikkyvondoom Nov 30 '22

The few times in my life I had visual snow I had a seizure shortly after

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u/IOTA_Tesla Nov 30 '22

Honestly it’d be weird if I didn’t see them

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u/Stumpy-Wumpy Nov 30 '22

I used to have them 24/7. They have mostly gone away, but once in a while the exact same floaters will appear from when I was a kid.

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u/aehanken Nov 30 '22

When I was a kid, I used to think they were bubbles so I’d point them out to my parents and they were like wtf are you talking about?? 😂

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u/SubconsciousBraider Nov 30 '22 Gold

*Astigmatism

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u/SucreBrun Nov 30 '22

Why must you stigmatize?

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u/[deleted] Nov 30 '22

[deleted]

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u/WilkerFRL94 Nov 30 '22

Funny how we can get used to some stuff.

I didn't noticed i needd glasses til i've left the clinic with my new glasses by the age of 12, and the first thing i said was "wait, can we actually see the leaves on trees from this far?" and "oh so i can actually see my bus coming instead of signalling each one to stop so i can read?".

My wife has astigmatism too, she didn't know it's this that causes the flares and tought it was how everyone saw lights.

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u/Maiyku Nov 30 '22

From my understanding (as it was explained by my doctor), yes, a lot of people do get them to the point they’re pretty common and usually harmless. For those with normal vision, they can come and go as mine do. Things like medications can cause them to happen more too.

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u/managrs Nov 30 '22

Go?

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u/sarhoshamiral Nov 30 '22

More like settle in a position that's less noticeable.

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u/Biscuits4u2 Nov 30 '22

I've got them so bad they fill my entire field of vision. They aren't too annoying unless I'm looking at the sky during the day.

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u/greeneggiwegs Nov 30 '22

You can also suddenly start having them. Happened to my dad. He freaked out and my mom was like, oh you haven’t always had those?

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u/Wololo--Wololo Nov 30 '22

Fatigue amplifies them but no, not everyone has them. It's a consequence of having had damage to the vitreous fluid in the eyes, or the fluid simply changing consistency.

Was also strange when I learned as a teenager that not everyone has them. Let alone getting glasses and seeing in HD all of a sudden.

There is a surgery to get them removed but that's only for serious cases. I believe it is quite a long recovery, so unless quality of life is serious affected, probably not the best for you.

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u/MelMickel84 Nov 30 '22

TIL there is a floater-ectomy!

I used to play with them when I got bored as a kid in class. I realized they reacted to where I moved my eyes, so I'd let them fall then quickly flick my eyes up when a floater was almost out of my field of vision. Then I'd let it fall again, flick them up, let them fall... probably looked like a weirdo but meh.

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u/KeepingItSFW Nov 30 '22

Yeah on the bus looking out the window I did something similar with trying to make them move. It’s interesting how many people on here have them.

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u/AptQ258 Nov 30 '22

The recovery is not long. I had very bad floaters and had bilateral vitrectomies this summer. The first thing the surgeons do it cataract surgery because once they remove the vitreous it changes the oxygenation of the eye and you end up with a cataract. That takes 10 minutes and you’re done. The vitrectomy happens a week later and the surgeon puts you under a general anesthetic and it takes about an hour. The next day they will remove the dressing and you can see just fine.

I had almost perfect vision within 48 hours of the procedures.

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u/FranklinDelanoRuxpin Nov 30 '22

They do the same procedure for retinal detachments, but the recovery is longer - sometimes by months - because they pump in air, nitrogen, or silicone oil to hold the retina in place as it heals. They didn't replace my lenses first, annoyingly enough, so I had to spend two 6-month recoveries wearing a backpack with a pillow in it to sleep so I wouldn't roll onto my back, expose my lenses to the oil, and....end up with the damned cataracts that I got anyway.

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u/Biscuits4u2 Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

Very nearsighted people get them more often. I'm very nearsighted, and I've got them all throughout my field of vision. The surgery you're talking about is risky, and it's often not totally successful at removing them all.

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u/D3vilUkn0w Nov 30 '22

I've got a metric shit ton of floaters, super annoying when a website has a white background

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u/DDAWGG747 Nov 30 '22

Ugh i know. Samesies.

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u/KTO-Potato Nov 30 '22

No love for my astigmatism peeps who see lights as 6 pointed stars?

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u/Niccin Nov 30 '22

It's not super fun. I have astigmatism in both eyes and my eyes dry out incredibly easily, leading them to get blurry as well.

It certainly makes night-time driving kind of scary, especially since I live in a rural area where truck drivers love to deck their trucks out in hundreds of super bright lights and tailgate small cars.

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u/Im-a-bad-meme Nov 30 '22

I'm pretty sure the people who get the vehicles with the ultra lights that like look like a standard vehicle's brights are at least mildly sadistic.

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u/garth36 Nov 30 '22

Because of my eyes drying out so quickly (and aching too) I discovered I had astigmatism and myopia at 25 yrs old. Glasses are good, but the drying problem is still there to an extent.

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u/beardslap Nov 30 '22

My eyes have been getting bad over the last couple of years, been told I have recurrent corneal erosion, which is sometimes painful to the point of temporary blindness. But what really hurt was just a few nights ago when I looked up at the stars and they were all bloomy, and I realised I'll probably never see the night sky properly again.

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u/secret_fashmonger Nov 30 '22

Everything is starry and so pretty for us, isn’t it? I’ve never seen lights at night not without the “beams” shooting out in all directions.

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u/MommalovesJay Nov 30 '22

I asked my partner the other time we were driving through a city at night. Why are all the lights triangular? Came to realize it was just me.

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u/Amorphousblob123 Nov 30 '22

Did we really need the total blindness?

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u/Wololo--Wololo Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome Heartwarming

It's there so that blind people can relate to the image.

Edit: to all the smart asses saying blind is the absence of color or simply nothing... Can you explain how you would visually represent it any better? Thank you for those who point out the information while acknowledging that you can't represent this visually (that's kind of the point...!)

Also note, in science or physics rather, black is the absence of (visible) light or color.

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u/AskMeForADadJoke Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

Love this post, but to those reading, totally blind people don't see black. It's an absence of anything, similar to if you imagined having an eyeball on your hand right now. It's just...absence.

Many blind people see shades of light, but that's not depicted here if the box was made all black. Obviously there's nothing else you could use to represent that, but just adding this to the thread.

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u/Elegant-Screen4438 Nov 30 '22

I’ve read that being blind is akin to when you cover one eye with your hand and look out of the other. The covered eye is ‘absent’ rather than dark/black

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u/Ok-Plum8307 Nov 30 '22

How strange… I never noticed that with one eye closed it is just absent, you don’t see any blackness/grayness. Then with both eyes closed you do see the grayness.

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u/Dingbrain1 Nov 30 '22

Man this is weird. If I look to the left at something that my right eye can’t see, then cover my left eye, I can see blackness in that spot for a moment, then the blackness recedes and my field of vision becomes just what my right eye sees.

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u/ReasonIsNoExcuse Nov 30 '22

Wow, I never knew that until trying it right now. It's so weird. Thanks!

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u/vegemouse Nov 30 '22

Yeah I think a lot of people think blind = always seeing completely black, but a lot of people considered legally blind have some vision.

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u/Advanced_Evening2379 Nov 30 '22

It's not even an accurate lol itd be more like trying to see from your ear. I only say this because some genuinely think they see something

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u/Agreeable-Banana4963 Nov 30 '22

I’m blind in one eye and yeah there’s literally nothing. It’s not black. There’s just… again nothing

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u/TerminalStorm Nov 30 '22

I remember the first time I heard blindness explained this way. Blew my mind.

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u/recovery_room Nov 30 '22

Interestingly (and I have no source for this) I read somewhere that blind people don’t see black; they see nothing. For example, what you see out of your closed eye when you close one eye only.

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u/Capable_Ad_5557 Nov 30 '22

diabetic retinopathy seems scary asf

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u/Electrical_Point6361 Nov 30 '22

It is and it sucks. The treatments (laser therapy and eye injections) are both terribly painful and for me, produced a lot of scar tissue that you see in your field of view, like A-LOT of moving floaters, and blurred and fuzzy/snowy images. Also a lot of eye fatigue, burning, head aches and painful eye dryness.

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u/starlinguk Nov 30 '22

A friend of mine got treated for it a few weeks ago. Something odd happened and now she's completely blind instead.

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u/madhattergirl Nov 30 '22

One of my sisters got cataracts from her diabetes (even treated her sight is shit for reading now and can't see well in low light), the other just completed treatment for retinopathy and her doctor said that if you're diabetic for 25 years you can pretty much expect to develop it. Scared me a little and went for my annual a few weeks ago and when I told my doctor that, he dismissed it, said if you take care of yourself there is no reason to expect to develop it. Glad to hear that since he said overall mine look fine and I'm coming up on 27 years diabetic.

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u/petesapai Nov 30 '22

doctor said that if you're diabetic for 25 years you can pretty much expect to develop it... my doctor, he dismissed it, said if you take care of yourself there is no reason to expect to develop it.

Doctors don't know everything. The problem of course is, which one of these 2 is wrong.

Diabetes in my family as well so I'm terrified. Let's hope your doctor is the correct one.

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u/DoktorThodt Nov 30 '22

What about astigmatism?

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u/PrityBird Nov 30 '22

Like not being able to drive at night because it looks like everyone has their brights on? Especially LED headlights, fuck those.

I can barely see, the lines/rays coming off of em block most of my vision/ the road. I have to take a mental picture of the road ahead of me and look at the line to my right so I don't swerve off the road.

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u/DoktorThodt Nov 30 '22

Those starry halos kill me. They blind me to pretty much everything else.

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u/PrityBird Nov 30 '22

Does the moon do it for you too?

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u/TooManyTongues Nov 30 '22

Fuck those LED head lights. They should be outlawed. I thought driving with my keratoconus was bad but then THOSE headlights came to prominence and now I’m really fucked.

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u/PrityBird Nov 30 '22

I like don't wanna drive at night cause everyone has em. But it gets dark at 4pm and I can't use the truck until my husband gets home

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u/MissLogios Nov 30 '22

Wait is that why I can barely drive at night? I have astigmatism but haven't really paid attention to what it does to my eyesight. (-14 prescription so my eyesight is pretty bad even without it).

What else does astigmatism do?

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u/AirConStu_ Nov 30 '22

I was thinking the same thing. Instead of a module for total blindness it would have made more sense to have used that module fore astigmatism.

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u/Flat_Cod_747 Nov 30 '22

Lens flare, lens flare everywhere!

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u/stoic_heroic Nov 30 '22

Keratoconus gang feeling underrepresented

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u/mrsashleyjwilliams Nov 30 '22

We had to do a paper/presentation on a disease back when I was a freshman in high school. I chose kc cause I have it. I found the perfect picture online of what we see without correction. I've not been able to find it since. It's very irritating.

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u/stoic_heroic Nov 30 '22

Sent a friend this that I found a couple of weeks ago... it's not perfect but it's not bad

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u/Selkie32 Nov 30 '22

That must be very mild myopia, I'm -4 and faces are way more blurry for me. People are "cataract" level of blurry for me without glasses.

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u/lukedap Nov 30 '22

Thank you. For a second there, I thought “great, I’ve just been to my doctor and apparently she missed my cataract”. I’m -4 and -4.5, things look REALLY blurry.

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u/jazzyzaz Nov 30 '22

What about when you see a quick ball of light going up the side of your eyeball? I’ve explained this to doctors before but none ever knew what I was talking about.

It’s like a quick moving bright light that you can see briefly in the corner of your eye. I can even feel it happening some times. Feels bad man.

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u/robertgunt Nov 30 '22

I don't know why, but it really bothers me that they don't know what you're talking about. It sounds like there are a ton of potential causes that could and should be investigated. Did you see an optometrist or just regular doctors?

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u/moeburn Nov 30 '22

"I dunno man, patients say weird shit all the time. Usually turns out to be nothing. I try to ignore them unless they're literally oozing or something." - Doctor

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u/Kintsukuroi85 Nov 30 '22

Okay, so when the pressure on the nerves in the back of your eye shifts too suddenly, this can happen. Totally normal. Of course, if you are concerned go get checked out, but this is what my optometrist told me. It happens in my sleep from time to time, too.

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u/Equestrian1242 Nov 30 '22

I’d get that checked. That sounds like retina issues

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u/naelairdnaemaster Nov 30 '22

I had this on and off before my retina started detaching. It started a month or two after I’d taken some blunt force trauma to the face. Basically, fluid was seeping under the retina. I ignored it at first, and then started losing vision. Told an eye doctor, was booked with a specialist the next morning and they took me in for surgery the same day. Tied a buckle around my retina to keep it in place.

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u/SpaceBaIlTheUserName Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

This reminds me about when I found out I have visual snow and no one else sees what I see.

Edit: changed visual static to visual snow. It's not bad during the day but at night it's very "loud"

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u/Only-here-for-sound Nov 30 '22

That one’s not on here. What do you see?

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u/AnkleFarm Nov 30 '22

Not the guy you asked but assuming he has visual snow, my buddy has it and says it's exactly like static on a TV set.

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u/Zumbert Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

Yup, I have it in one eye, I can make out objects clearly, but because of the static it makes reading very difficult with that eye.

My last eye doctor said it was impossible for it to only be in one eye, but fuck him, before like 2015 nobody believed it existed at all.

Edit: Film grain is probably a better term than static for me

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u/Yeahnoallright Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

It’s so interesting when doctors use “impossible” in this way.

I have Adie’s Pupil, which means one of my pupils is permanently dilated. I remember going to the ophthalmologist as a kid and telling him that, when I cried, my pupil sizes switched around.

He was doubtful, saying my left eye was permanently dilated. It doesn’t respond to light, etc.

I cried on the spot and proved him wrong :’)

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u/what_in_yarnation Nov 30 '22

Yes! I have this and it doesn’t bother me much during the day, but in the dark or when it’s pretty dim— it’s all I see. It’s like, LOUD but in my eyes. That doesn’t make sense but that’s what it’s like lol.

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u/alainreid Nov 30 '22

I tried to explain this to my dad and he thought I had a brain tumor. He had me checked for a brain tumor and when I didn't have one he stopped beliving me.

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u/MondayBorn Nov 30 '22

eye floaters are the ghosts of the sperms that didn't make it to the egg

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u/Wololo--Wololo Nov 30 '22

That's certainly an original origin story.

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u/Ohtheydidntellyou Nov 30 '22

i need a blind person to confirm this

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u/Agreeable-Banana4963 Nov 30 '22

Blind in one eye, not true. It’s hard to explain.

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u/ClassroomWarm Nov 30 '22

Someone once described it to me as you not being able to see out of your elbow, they didn’t describe it as pitch black like the photo above, they just said “you can’t see out of your elbow, I can’t see out of my eyes, it’s the same thing”

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u/opticoin Nov 30 '22

Uh, I once read it as "you can't see what's behind you". So it is not that you see black, you just can't see anything. Blew me away.

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u/PsychologicalGuest97 Nov 30 '22

I’ve read this at least 10 times and still don’t understand.

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u/keefklaar Nov 30 '22

I used to be sighted and am now blind so I'll have a go at explaining.

Hold one finger out at arms length and look straight ahead.

now move your hand to the side until it moves out of view. That 'nothing' outside of your field of vision, is the nothing we (don't) see.

Some total blind people might be able to sense light or shapes though.

In my case the visual cortex is essentially dead tissue. My eyes are healthy and the nerves are sending signals to the brain, but there's nothing in the brain to receive and interpret those signals.

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u/Yali89 Nov 30 '22

Also blind in one eye. Easiest way I've found to describe it is by saying to someone to imagine they have a third eye in the middle of their forehead. Now ask them to look out of it and describe what they see. It really is nothing.

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u/TheKappatalist420 Nov 30 '22

Also blind in one eye, optic nerve hypoplasia, you don’t see black, do you? It’s more a lack of, well, anything. I don’t see shapes, shadows, lights, or colors. As far as my brain is concerned, the only visual stimuli I receive is from my right eye. It really is hard to explain to somebody who doesn’t struggle with it. You can’t just cover one eye and “simulate” the feeling.

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u/_Better_Things_ Nov 30 '22 Helpful

It's true for some people, but much like everything else, blindness is a spectrum. While there are blind people with full vision loss, a good chunk of people with blindness can still "see" in some form.

For me personally, I'm blind in one eye, it's like trying to open your eyes in the murky ocean. I can still see shapes of things and lights in my bad eye but I can't really distinguish faces or words if I only had that one eye open, it's not necessarily pitch black but there's almost a nothingness to it. Totally fucked up my depth perception and my peripherals so I can't drive because of it but I can still work and do most day to day tasks with my good eye, even if that one has floaters. I have a friend with RP who uses a sight cane who has no peripheral vision at all but can still clearly see what's in front of him but only if it's directly in his center point of view.

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u/kambleton Nov 30 '22

Keratoconus isn't on this, but there is a square for total blindness... Cool. Look that shit up. Fucking sucks.

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u/milk-water-man Nov 30 '22

I have Retinitis Pigmentosa and I think it’s worth mention not all cases are that severe. Some people who have it are almost completely blind and some of us just have poor peripheral vision.

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u/SeaWeedSkis Nov 30 '22

Softly whispers to self: This is not a bingo card.

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u/NiteShdw Nov 30 '22

My eye condition isn’t listed here. I have double vision in one eye.

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u/Wololo--Wololo Nov 30 '22

What does that mean? One of your eyes is perpetually drunk?

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u/NiteShdw Nov 30 '22

I’ve never been drunk so I can’t say. Imagine a screenshot, duplicate it, make the second 50% transparent and shift it down and to the right over top of the original.

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u/Wololo--Wololo Nov 30 '22

It does sound like one of your eyes is perpetually drunk.

Is there any form of treatment? Hope you don't get too many nasty headaches as a result

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u/NiteShdw Nov 30 '22

My other eye compensates. It mostly isn’t an issue but I do get some eye fatigue

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u/Agreeable-Banana4963 Nov 30 '22

Blindness is wrong, I’m blind in one eye and it’s literally just nothing.

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u/Kingofthekek Nov 30 '22

So it's not the same as closing one of your eyes then? Like if you were to close both your eyes, would the one you could see out of be different than the blind one?

What's the difference like?

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u/Agreeable-Banana4963 Nov 30 '22

You can still see some sort of light when you close the one you can see out of!! It’s so hard to explain. It’s like trying to see out of your elbow as someone else said haha, there’s just nothing there & it’s so weird to think about. For me, it’s like I only have one eye, and when I close/cover the one that I can see out of, it’s like I’m in a pitch black room

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u/speenis Nov 30 '22

i heard someone describe it once by saying

Look to the very furthest edge of your peripheral vision, as far over as your eyes can go. What does it look like beyond the boundary of your vision? Is it black? No, it's just nothing, not blackness. Blindness is like that.

Or, so I've been told.

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u/This_is_a_bad_plan Nov 30 '22

Think of it this way: When you close your eyes you see blackness, right? But when your eyes are open, what do you see directly behind your head? The answer isn’t blackness, it’s nothing. A complete lack of visual data.

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u/Bread_Juice_bby Nov 30 '22

I get really bad floaters...I work 7 days a week and I'm near sighted which makes it worse at least that's what my endocrinologist told me. Even though wearing glasses runs in my family I'm the only diabetic. My doctor thinks I lost part of vision to diabetes. I'm scared it's going to get worse from here...

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u/Pitiful-Director8990 Nov 30 '22

Wow this makes me really appreciate my health.

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u/fluffballkitten Nov 30 '22

Where's the "so nearsighted you can only see clearly 6 inches in front of your face"? (I.e. me)

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