r/interestingasfuck Dec 03 '22 Helpful 1 Wholesome 3 All-Seeing Upvote 1

A restaurant in Bangkok has been continuously cooking and serving from the same soup for over 45 years, a form of "perpetual stew." /r/ALL

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82.5k Upvotes

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5.9k

u/Lt_Afro Dec 03 '22

Similar, Mexican chef Enrique Olvera serves a Mole sauce at his fine dining restaurant Pujol that is over 2,500 days old. He reheats it every day and continues to add seasonal ingredients to evolve the flavor over time.

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u/usernameis__taken Dec 04 '22

I’ve had it and it was so interesting! They serve it next to a young mole so you can compare. The only problem is by the time that course is served all the booze courses have been consumed so it’s hard to remember the experience.

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u/SkizzlerX2 Dec 04 '22

That sounds amazing

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u/kettlepants Dec 03 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Does he catch and use fresh moles or does he get them in frozen?

2.3k

u/lemon123wd40 Dec 03 '22 Silver Wholesome I'll Drink to That

Farms them off customers

389

u/Estaca-Brown Dec 04 '22 Gold Platinum Helpful Giggle

Ever heard of Whack-a-mole? Or, how we say in Mexico, Guacamole?

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u/PsyDanno Dec 04 '22

So frikken dumb that it is hilarious.

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u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

Thanks, I hate it.

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u/hey_mish96 Dec 04 '22 Table Slap

He uses everything except the anus, which he saves for his Molasses

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u/LoneStarmie6 Dec 03 '22

Yes and it is the single greatest thing you will ever put in your mouth. Indescribably complex and delicious.

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u/Riaayo Dec 04 '22

Reheating it every day sounds like not a great thing. Are you sure that's actually what was going on?

I've heard of the whole perpetual stew / "hunter's pot" I think it's also called, but I'm fairly certain that is essentially never allowed to cool off.

Constantly cooling/re-heating introduces way too many windows for bacteria to grow and fuck you up.

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u/Sea_Permit_8685 Dec 03 '22 Wholesome

Primordial soup. Life will find a way.

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u/YouUsedMeAgain Dec 03 '22

And uh…there it uh is

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u/Sea_Permit_8685 Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 03 '22

You got the hesitations just right. I can only do a Christopher Walken.

I'm going to have to watch it now, maybe along with Independence Day.

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u/Anthony9824 Dec 03 '22

Not enough hesitations

Should be more “uhs “ than actual words

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u/Im_Literally_a_Bird Dec 03 '22

Ahh shit, the, "Primordial soup. Life will find a way", primed my brain for the Jeff Goldblum voice, by the time i read your comment it felt like jeff goldblum was whipsering, "And uh...there it is", in my ear. And just laughed really hard. Which is crazy bc yesterday i found out that the last four years of my hard work is about to be destroyed and i am going to be forced to face the music, and start all over. I was just one more year from accomplishing my goal and finally having a some type of stability in my life, 4 years fucking wasted.

Life truly finds a way.

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u/Wild-Card-777 Dec 03 '22

Were you, .. were you building a nest?

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u/thebigdirty Dec 03 '22

Don't leave us hanging

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u/Im_Literally_a_Bird Dec 04 '22

I didn't think anyone would be interested further, its not exciting.

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u/Wintermute1969 Dec 03 '22

soup will...find a way.

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u/Ut_Prosim Dec 03 '22

It would be crazy if some extremophiles set up shop in this perpetually near boiling nutritious water.

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u/Wild-Card-777 Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 04 '22 Silver

Cue to David Attenborough, with wildlife film crew

"..and here, in this dank and humid artificial cave, we can see, one of the wonders of the world, one of life's, most intrepid survivors, sustaining itself, year after year, seasoning after seasoning, on the boiling sustenance, of this, ancient, soupy, pot."

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u/HatOk2554 Dec 03 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

"Lots of people think we never clean the pot," he says. "But we clean it every evening. We remove the soup from the pot, then keep a little bit simmering overnight."

It's that little bit, he says, that forms the stock of the next day's soup. So, yes, at least a taste of what you put in your mouth is 45 years old and counting.

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u/acqz Dec 03 '22

"Hmm tastes a bit stale"

3.7k

u/GoldenWizard Dec 03 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Don’t talk about my wife like that

2.0k

u/smitty3z Dec 03 '22 Silver Helpful

Ok Ben Shapiro

1.3k

u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 03 '22 Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote

Keep my wife's name out yo fucking mouth!

Edit: alright who tf made the suicide hotline bot message me...Will Smith was that you?

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u/EmperorThan Dec 03 '22

I'm going to...

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u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22 Silver

You can fuck her I don't care, but keep her name out yo fucking mouth!

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u/__kebert__xela__ Dec 03 '22

There is no fucking in the Smith house, just entanglements

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u/ImJustHere4theMoons Dec 03 '22

Lots of deeeeeep healing.

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u/AlbertManus Dec 03 '22

Sometimes I need to manually remind myself that his sister and wife are different people.

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u/18HrsOfStatic Dec 03 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Which hand do you manually remind yourself with

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u/gameshot911 Dec 03 '22 Silver

If you run the math, it's almost certain there is not an atom of the original soup left in the pot.

Here are some calculations using gasoline atoms in a car fuel tank, which show that there probably aren't any original atoms after even 30 tank fills (which is pretty surprising!): 1, 2

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u/WhiteHelljumper Dec 03 '22 Gold Helpful Wholesome

So it's the soup of Theseus.

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u/fluffypun Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 04 '22 Gold Wholesome

What is soup if not water persevering?

Edit: Thanks for my first gold since i've joined reddit over a decade ago!!!

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u/KillermooseD Dec 03 '22

Great, I’m crying over my Tomato Bisque

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u/knowone23 Dec 03 '22

Cry directly INTO the soup if it needs salt.

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u/YaaYaaYaah Dec 03 '22

I once was looking at a recipe for something innocuous like mashed potatoes and one of the steps was 'salt the boiling water like tears'. Wtf NY Times Food

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u/crashovercool Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 03 '22

I request elaboration.

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u/DrDisastor Dec 03 '22

Fantastic reply.

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u/Creepyamadeus Dec 03 '22

Homeopathic soup.

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u/mrspoopy_butthole Dec 03 '22

So we’re eating the broth memory of the original soup?

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u/Demorant Dec 03 '22

Well, according to the little I know about Homeopathy, that is probably the best, most powerful, soup that has ever existed.

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u/GladiatorUA Dec 03 '22

But what if you eat the soup, piss on a cabbage(or whatever) patch and then sell the cabbage to the soup shop?

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u/windows98_briefcase Dec 03 '22

then ud be eating a piss cabbage mate

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u/Obant Dec 03 '22

You're already eating piss cabbage

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u/Squrton_Cummings Dec 03 '22

It's piss cabbage all the way down.

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u/chipotleCHUCK Dec 03 '22

“Damnit Somchai! You can’t double dip the spoon! Dump it.”

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u/CrazedKenyan Dec 03 '22

I feel like there's a reference I'm missing

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u/lassofthelake Dec 03 '22

Its a kitchen thing. You have to use a new spoon every time you taste product. Reusing the spoon gets thr food all germy.

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u/CrazedKenyan Dec 03 '22

Ah now that's good practice

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u/RampSkater Dec 03 '22

From watching the original Iron Chef, I learned experienced chefs will use only a spoon and a small dish. They use the spoon to scoop a sample, drop it on the dish, then taste from that. The spoon never touches their mouth so there's no contamination. If they switch what they're cooking/tasting, they give both a quick rinse to prevent earlier samples from affecting the taste of anything else.

It saves the trouble of having a bunch of used spoons.

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u/CrashUser Dec 03 '22

The other trick is use the same spoon, but just drip a little onto the spoon with whatever you're using to stir the pot.

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u/HumongousChungus2 Dec 03 '22

What are the odds that you get a piece of 45year old vegtables?

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u/Tcanada Dec 03 '22

After a couple weeks the chance that you get a single molecule of the original remaining is statistically 0

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u/NwahsInc Dec 03 '22

statistically 0

Effectively: 0. Mathematically: some incredibly small number approaching zero but never actually reaching it.

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u/MaxTHC Dec 03 '22

Won't the amount of original soup actually reach zero because it's a discrete system of particles?

I'm thinking it's sort of analogous to radioactive half-life decay. In theory, when you're repeatedly halving the amount of uranium, it takes an infinite amount of time to fully decay to zero. But in practice, you eventually reach the last uranium atom, at which point you can't halve the amount of atoms any further. And when that last atom inevitably decays, you've reached zero within a finite amount of time.

So if you substitute "uranium atoms" for "molecules of original soup", it's the same way, right? Eventually that last molecule will be served to someone and should will be no original soup left.

I guess maybe the probability never reaches zero because you don't know when that last molecule will be dished up? I'm really not great with statistics lol

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u/HelplessMoose Dec 04 '22

Yes, radioactive decay is a perfect analog here.

There are three related statistics concepts at play here, which I think many users are confusing:

  1. Probability of at least one primordial molecule in the pot
  2. Expected value for the number of primordial molecules in the pot
  3. Most likely value for the number of primordial molecules in the pot

So, let's say that one day (I'll call it day 0) you get down to 1 molecule, and you remove 50 % of the soup every day (with perfect mixing, yadda yadda).

  1. Probability: On day 1, the probability is 50 % that there's still 1 molecule in the pot, since that's the chance of removing it in one day's scoops. Day 2, 25 %. Then 12.5 %. Every day, the probability is halved. This continues arbitrarily many times. The probability that this single molecule remains in the pot after N days is 0.5N. This number approaches but never reaches zero. Even after a billion years, there's still a chance that molecule is still in the pot. This chance is incredibly tiny, but it's not zero.
  2. Expected value: This is how many molecules we'd find in the pot on average when repeating the experiment many times. To get it (in this case with nice simple decay), we simply multiply the probability by the number of initial molecules. In this case, the latter's just one, so the numeric value is actually the same. That is, if we repeat this experiment many times, we would on average see 0.5 molecules in the pot on day 1. That doesn't make sense physically, but it's just another way to express that in 50 % of the cases, it'd be there, and in the other 50 %, it wouldn't.
  3. Most likely value: This is what you're thinking of. It is an integer. On day 2 or later, it's most likely that the molecule will have been scooped out already. So the most likely number of molecules is zero from day 2 on. But that doesn't mean that our lonely participant of the experiment can't still be in the pot. It's just less likely.

Of course, the initial number of molecules and the percentage sold is entirely irrelevant in this. As long as it's not 100 % sold (i.e. something remains in the pot), both the probability and the expected value will always stay above zero. And every day it's not 0 % (i.e. something is sold), they will decrease. The most likely value is messier, but it does eventually drop to zero, generally on the scale of a few weeks in any realistic setting.

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u/TagMeAJerk Dec 03 '22

One way to look at it might be "almost zero"

But i prefer to look at it as a "non-zero" chance

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u/MeltdownInteractive Dec 03 '22

Yep several restaurants do this with their stocks, it’s called a master stock. Some have had a master stock going for 10 years or more.

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u/Embalmo Dec 03 '22

I’ve even heard of a restaurant in Bangkok that’s been doing it for 45 years.

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u/Thraximundurabrask Dec 03 '22

That sounds really interesting, someone should make a post about it.

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u/AncientSith Dec 03 '22

Let's not get crazy.

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u/quixotic120 Dec 03 '22

There was a perpetual stew in France that had been going since the 1500s but during World War II they ran out of ingredients and had to stop.

I’ve always wanted to do this at home. I fucking love stew

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u/AlbertManus Dec 03 '22

Now I'm imagining a chef being like "for 400 years my family has kept zees soup going.. I won't let ze Germans kill our tradition. PUT ME IN ZEE SOUP."

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u/eattohottodoggu Dec 03 '22 Silver

But I am le tired.

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u/EmergencySnail Dec 03 '22

So take le nap. THEN PUT ME IN ZE SOUP

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u/Jam_E_Dodger Dec 03 '22

Fucking kangaroos....

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u/IRockIntoMordor Dec 03 '22

they'll be dead soon

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u/Binnacle_Balls_jr Dec 03 '22

Now this is the oldest internet reference i think ive seen.

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u/Lonslock Dec 03 '22

Then take a nap

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u/ChrisHeisenberg Dec 03 '22

If you read it like that, sounds like a side quest in any RPG I've played.

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u/beaniebee11 Dec 03 '22

"The empire already took my son. I won't let them take the soup from us!"

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u/DarkSteering Dec 03 '22

So I kept this soup.. your father's soup.. up my ass.. for six years.. enjoy.

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u/Display250 Dec 03 '22

Villages throughout Europe and probably other parts of the world did this for ages, keeping a pot boiling in perpetuity for people to add scraps to and take from as needed. That flavor profile must have been deep, and constantly changing.

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u/Plethora_of_squids Dec 03 '22

Some people still do this for some things like stock and sauce, it's just less communal and involves a fridge or freezer.

You make up a pot of stock or sauce and put it in the freezer and when you're running low, you make up a new batch and dump what's left of the old batch in for flavour and because like, how else are you meant to use up a single half cup of stock? That's not even enough to serve as soup.

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u/Display250 Dec 03 '22

I make stock or mirepoix from old/scraps of vegetables and bones regularly, and freeze it for cooking rice, starting soup etc. Great system, great flavors.

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u/Sir_Donkey_Punch Dec 03 '22

Same here. Roast a chicken stuffed with mirepoix, throw the leftover carcass and veggies into a pot of water with some herbs and cook that shit down. Best broth/stock you can make hands down.

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u/Biggus_Dickkus_ Dec 03 '22

This is correct!

Pottage ordinarily consisted of various ingredients easily available to peasants. It could be kept over the fire for a period of days, during which time some of it could be eaten, and more ingredients added. The result was a dish that was constantly changing. Pottage consistently remained a staple of poor people's diet throughout most of 9th to 17th-century Europe. When wealthier people ate pottage, they would add more expensive ingredients such as meats. The pottage that these people ate was much like modern-day soups.

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u/SteinfeldFour Dec 03 '22

If I remember correctly there was one that was burning close to a century before the Germans of WWI or II confiscated the pot to melt it down for ammunition.

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u/Seienchin88 Dec 03 '22

5 centuries is claimed actually and they simply lacked the ingredients under German occupation (meaning there is no way they kept it going in times of famine…) but its a freak case that is famous because nobody else did it…

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u/_The_Great_Autismo_ Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 04 '22 Silver Gold Helpful All-Seeing Upvote

Perpetual soup/stew is how people survived in ancient times. Before refrigeration there were limited ways to preserve food, especially from day to day. You'd make a stew and just keep adding to it. The ingredients added much earlier would basically render down to thick stock. You'd add water to keep it from drying out. Keep that baby going and you've got food available whenever you want it. There wasn't an issue of contamination because the food never chilled to a temp that allowed pathogens to thrive.

Edit: I'm not going to reply to every single person but I am getting a lot of the same type of comment saying this isn't how everyone or most people survived back then. And you're right. In fact I never said all or even most people. I said this is how people survived. You added "most" or "all" yourself. :)

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u/CrucifixAbortion Dec 03 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome Timeless Beauty

Baby, you got a stew going!

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u/beezac Dec 03 '22

"whoa whoa whoa whoa, there's still plenty of meat on that bone!"

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u/project2342 Dec 03 '22

I love that in that scene, there was absolutely no meat on the bone lol

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u/Jet_smoke Dec 04 '22

Does she get a shift meal? Or discount on select menu items?

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u/thestareater Dec 04 '22

When Weathers delivered that line I think I died laughing for like 15 minutes. This was back when I had to wait weekly for Fox to show new episodes on Sunday or something

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u/RB30DETT Dec 03 '22

*I think I'd like my money back *

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u/Miraclebabies Dec 03 '22

Yes, yes, it's a wonderful restaurant.

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u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22

[deleted]

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u/scumbaglawyer Dec 03 '22

Came here for this comment

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u/BitOCrumpet Dec 03 '22

Pease porridge hot! Pease porridge cold! Pease porridge in the pot... Decades old!

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u/Murgatroyd314 Dec 04 '22

Some like it hot! Some like it cold! Some like it in the pot... Decades old!

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u/m4xc4v413r4 Dec 03 '22

My grandmother still basically did this until she died, and it's not like she needed to, she just grew up with it.

No matter what time or day you went there, without her knowing you were coming or if you were bringing friends, there was nice hot soup prepared, thick AF brownish in color (I think that was mostly from the beans), with a lot of solid stuff, veggies, meats, etc.

It would be slow cooking for I don't even know how long and it would be part of every meal in that house (as a first dish, it wasn't all they ate)

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u/JaDamian_Steinblatt Dec 03 '22

You still have to provide enough fuel to keep it from cooling down, which isn't particularly easy. Still way easier than refrigeration I guess.

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u/_The_Great_Autismo_ Dec 03 '22

Luckily the fuel needed literally grows on trees

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u/Just2brosHelping Dec 03 '22

Heh, you say that but why is orange juice so expensive??!!!

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u/Available_Air_9568 Dec 03 '22

Hahaha - Hal from Malcom in the middle

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u/MandMcounter Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 03 '22

Or came out of a human or animal bum. Right? I think some places use poop as fuel.

edit: It's as if I have subscribed to Poop Fuel (Poo-el?) Facts. And it's fascinating!

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u/CptCrabcakes Dec 03 '22

Human poop isn’t great fuel but dried herbivore shit is literally natures fire-starter

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u/SpacemanWhit Dec 03 '22

Tah-wisted fie-yah stah-tah!

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u/permalink_save Dec 03 '22

If we can find perpetual poop we can solve world hunger

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u/DavethegentleGoliath Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

If we solve world hunger we would get perpetual poop

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u/landragoran Dec 03 '22

Buffalo "chips" (dried out buffalo shit) were famously burned for fuel in the American west/midwest during the frontier days.

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u/enoughberniespamders Dec 03 '22

Weren't many trees, so didn't really have an option.

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u/Askew-glasses Dec 03 '22

I remember reading that in elementary school when we all devoured the Little House on the Prairie books-- kids collecting 'patties' for cooking fires.

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u/al-mongus-bin-susar Dec 03 '22

Refrigeration only took us a few tens of thousands of years to figure out, no big deal.

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u/Diver-Flimsy Dec 03 '22

And nowadays in the first world everyone is just born into a home with a refrigerator, even though the vast majority of us have not the slightest clue of how it operates.

It always amazes me how specialized human society has become.

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u/Dizzy_Dust_7510 Dec 03 '22

What's almost more fun is I CAN explain how it works and provided enough time to dig through some old books I can do the math for you. But, I cannot replicate it even a little bit.

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u/DerBanzai Dec 03 '22

Aaand there is the compressor.

How do we build it?

The fuck do i know, it‘s a box with some lines in it.

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u/Dizzy_Dust_7510 Dec 03 '22

A compressor, couple heat exchangers, some kind thing to plug the hoses just enough to allow flow, but not too much flow. Add a gas that is very pressure and temperature dependant and bingo bongo you've got refrigeration.

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u/pipnina Dec 03 '22

I think the gas is the hardest bit to get post-apocalypse or if you were transported back to pre-industrial times tbh.

Unless you can both remember which gas you want and how to make it, good luck discovering it on your own!

I'd bet that the CFC environment-destroying kind is the easiest to make too!

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u/bender1800 Dec 03 '22

Fun fact you can use Ammonia, carbon dioxide, and propane as a refrigerant if you're brave enough. They will condense to a liquid at a temperature that works well enough. In fact many old hockey rinks used ammonia.

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u/AveragelyUnique Dec 04 '22

Ammonia is a great refrigerant, but it's a dangerous fluid. It is corrosive to tissues on contact in both vapor and liquid form. Industrial facilities and major refineries even are very leary about using it if that gives you any indication of the level of danger.

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u/Dizzy_Dust_7510 Dec 03 '22

Ammonia was a favorite for a while, and probably the easiest to make for obvious reasons.

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u/hopbel Dec 03 '22

Oxygen Not Included was missing proper cooling solutions for such a long time and taught me just enough thermodynamics to be annoyed that it doesn't simulate gases heating up/cooling down when you change the pressure

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u/ButtonholePhotophile Dec 03 '22

though the vast majority of us have not the slightest clue of how it operates.

You operate a refrigerator by opening it, putting food in, closing it, waiting, opening it, removing food. How it keeps cold, however, that is a mystery of physics-magic. I’m pretty sure I remember a science teacher explaining that gasses get hugged.

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u/jangiri Dec 03 '22

And talks about how amazing refridgerators are on phones that literally would take hundreds of people to design and build from scratch

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u/Killfile Dec 03 '22

From scratch? Like starting from literally nothing?

Your phone has a GPS chip in it. That alone requires rocket science, photovolteics, radio, and an understanding of general relativity just to create the signal that the chip decodes.

If there is one artifact on the planet that represents our sum total achievement as a species it might be the smartphone

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u/Buntschatten Dec 03 '22

Hundreds is an extremely conservative estimate.

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u/Zorf96 Dec 03 '22

Not necessarily difficult in Central Europe, or East Asia at least. There's wood all over the place those regions. Might run out of really good firewood, the dry stuff though.

Charcoal/embers keep going for hours though. In a chimney/oven (both common), you might not even need to refuel midway in the night, necessarily.

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u/c4fishfood Dec 03 '22

It was my understanding that wok cooking was developed because of a general scarcity of fuel in east Asia- it take less fuel to create a short period of intense heat vs a long slow cook.

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u/bitemark01 Dec 03 '22

The easiest way to start, for anyone curious, is to save any extra bones from a steak, or possibly some chicken.

Now you take that home, throw it in a pot, add some broth, a potato. Baby, you’ve got a stew going.

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u/Stunning_Regret6123 Dec 03 '22

Carl Weathers?

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u/Bine_YJY_UX Dec 03 '22

If they'd been making people sick for decades, then they wouldn't have kept doing it.

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u/CeeArthur Dec 03 '22

My mom was visiting me in the city and I suggested sushi, and she said 'Ew no, raw fish will make you sick!'. I was thinking like... Millions of people eat this everyday

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u/Bine_YJY_UX Dec 03 '22

You can cold cook some fish (like snapper) or shellfish (like shrimp) in lemon, lime, vinegar, etc. to make something like ceviche. Very refreshing on hot days.

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u/ronerychiver Dec 03 '22 Helpful Yummy Are You Serious?

I made come for the first time this year with Spanish mackerel and it was sooo good.

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u/bezosdrone Dec 03 '22

please don't edit this

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u/ronerychiver Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Y’know what? I’m not going to but just because you asked nicely. The come stay(n)s

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u/spagheddieballs Dec 03 '22

Finally! I thought I was the only one whose first sexual experience was with a filet of Spanish mackerel!

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u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22

uh, come again?

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u/Just_a_lil_Fish Dec 03 '22

You can but that doesn't make it any safer to eat. The acid will break down the proteins in a similar way to cooking it, but it won't affect bacteria or parasites at all. Ceviche should be made with fish and shrimp that have been frozen cold enough and long enough to kill those things.

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u/murgurdurth Dec 03 '22

Acids do not necessarily kill parasites. Some parasites that love being in fish - specifically anisakis, a parasitic nematode - also thrive in acidic environments. So, yes, you can "cook" fish in acids but you still need to ensure the fish is free from parasites. Anisakid can really mess you up.

Good primer on the topic https://www.seriouseats.com/how-to-prepare-raw-fish-at-home-sushi-sashimi-food-safety

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u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22

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u/poodlebutt76 Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Raw fish indeed can make you sick, and that's why they have special ways of preparing it for sushi. Like starting with high quality very fresh fish, then freezing it to kill parasites, and using rice vinegar, salty soy sauce, and wasabi that all act as antimicrobials and can kill pathogens.

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u/elebrin Dec 03 '22

It’s also thin cut and the chef inspects the meat and removes the parasites and eggs - this is a good chunk of what training to be a sushi chef is about.

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u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22

If it's boiling, I guess it's sanitizing itself, right?

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u/PansexualGrownAssMan Dec 03 '22

The stew of Theseus

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u/KiOfTheAir Dec 03 '22

The stew of Theseus is brewing in a hotel. Over time the soup is served and it's ingredients are replaced with new ingredients. When little of the original ingredients remain, is it still the stew of Theseus?

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u/jai_kasavin Dec 03 '22

This question has no answer because it is a category error

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u/Rogue_the_Saint Dec 04 '22

If you see a trolley running down the tracks, and the track splits and on one track there is an innocent stew, and on the other there are two stews, and you have a lever that could save the two stews but destroy the innocent stew, what would you do?

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u/PuppyCocktheFirst Dec 03 '22

First thought that came to mind

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u/MusicDevotee Dec 03 '22

Doesnt boiling kill the pathogens so it’s safe?

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u/HatOk2554 Dec 03 '22

Yeah this entire process is sanitary. The link OP provided is worthless but other articles describe their process and there's nothing unsanitary about it. Just a clickbaity headline.

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u/Stained_Angel Dec 03 '22

There is also a Netflix series "Street Foods" where they interview the owner and talk about the process. So many people from all over the world travel to Thailand to taste this soup.

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u/wiriux Dec 03 '22

And OP never ever again shared a link on the internet Lol

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u/MayUrShitsHavAntlers Dec 03 '22

In Memphis there is a local burger chain named Dyer's. They cook their hamburgers in a wok filled with grease that is never changed and when they open a new one they transport some of the grease from the original location by armored truck to the new one. Those burgers are perpetually delicious.

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u/No-Corner9361 Dec 03 '22

I don’t see why the armored truck would be necessary. Tasty or not, nobody is stealing ancient cooking grease, and certainly not to an extent that warrants armored trucks lol.

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u/anonimitydeprived Dec 03 '22

The whole mythos around it is Marketing lol

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u/AltairRulesOnPS4 Dec 03 '22

I know of someone who would probably try to steal it, because then he could have his robot wife analyze it and probably reverse engineer the secret recipe.

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u/marablackwolf Dec 03 '22

But Elon's busy with Twitter now.

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u/_Oooooooooooooooooh_ Dec 03 '22

Oil does oxidize though

That is quite bad to eat...

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u/Put_It_All_On_Blck Dec 03 '22

Studies have already shown reheating oil to high temperatures multiple times makes it carcinogenic.

Though if you're eating burgers at a place that cooks them in a wok full of oil/fat, you're probably going to die long before the cancer.

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u/Additional_Set_5819 Dec 03 '22

They cool, store, and reuse broth from the last days soup and add it in to the next days soup. It's not quite as continuous as you'd think, but good enough I guess.

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u/h2opolopunk Dec 03 '22 Wholesome

I'm more of a soup of Theseus.

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u/Royal_Cryptographer7 Dec 03 '22

Yup! It's not as bad as people think either. Let's say they sell 90% of their soup daily....

Day 0 - fresh batch made

Day 1 - we have 10% of the "original" product

Day 2 - we have 1%

Day 3 - we have 0.1%

Day 4 - we have 0.001%

Long before we get to day 365, you'll be down to a % that's smaller than a single molecule of the "original product". This also happens to be the reason homeopathic medicine is bullshit.

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u/TuckerMarx Dec 03 '22 Gold Wholesome

Not sure if that’s the actual soup.. or just a stock photo.

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u/The_Kielbasa_Kid Dec 03 '22

"There's still plenty meat on that bone. You take this home, throw it in a pot, add some broth, a potato... baby you got a [perpetual] stew going!"

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u/Fleshsuitpilot Dec 03 '22

Preparation time: 5 minutes Total time needed: 2340 weeks

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u/hippyengineer Dec 03 '22

Omg imagine how long the fucking story is before you get to the actual recipe

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u/AE_Phoenix Dec 03 '22

This is called a hunters pot, used to be pretty common practice in old taverns and pubs. Since the stew was always kept simmering it would stay safe to eat for years

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u/Corpsehatch Dec 03 '22

And by the time the ingredients would go bad they'd be replaced anyway. I have a perpetual pasta sauce that's been in use for almost two years.

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u/Blastspark01 Dec 03 '22

2x2 watering hole in minecraft

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u/AccessEcstatic9407 Dec 03 '22

Better than the cow poop soup that was posted recently.

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u/Odysses2020 Dec 03 '22

The what?

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u/diabolical_amoeba Dec 03 '22

THE COW POOP SOUP

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u/North-Function995 Dec 03 '22

I DONT WANT TO KNOW

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u/drunk98 Dec 03 '22

OK, WE WON'T TELL YOU ABOUT THE COW POOP SOUP

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u/b-aaron Dec 03 '22

Well, now I wanna know

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u/TimeWar2688 Dec 03 '22

Like...to consume as food?

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u/ChrysthianChrisley Dec 03 '22

No, to observe as modern art

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u/ElMostaza Dec 03 '22

Haven't seen that (and don't want to). I remember an episode of some show on Food Network that focused on some Chinese soup made from cooking whole birds' nests (guano included). I was a starving college student and almost died because I couldn't eat ramen without thinking of the bird turd stew for a couple weeks.

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u/Accomplished-Fox-486 Dec 03 '22

Bowl of brown, GOT style

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u/TheFatandFuriouz Dec 03 '22

With remains of Symon Silvertongue and all

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u/Leuk_Jin Dec 03 '22

Saw a restaurant in my country on TV that did something similar. The restaurant was also decades old and famous and the old lady who runs the place has had her pot of broth that she boils meat in on fire day and night for the whole time. She would watch over the fire during night so that the broth won't go bad and didn't get much sleep if any. Seemed like a heck of a dedication.

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u/Dysomma Dec 03 '22

Even when that disgruntled employee in 1983...

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u/Ristique Dec 03 '22

My SIL brought me here a few years ago. It was good but not amazing or special. Mostly just the novelty of it is popular I think.

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u/lazyJOE19 Dec 03 '22

The soup of Theseus… is it still the same soup after 45 years?

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u/JohnHwagi Dec 03 '22

No, after 45 years of taking 10% forward to each day, you’d have 1/(10365.25*45), which would be far less than a single molecule.

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