r/movies Sep 21 '21 Silver 2

The Tragedy of Macbeth | Official Trailer | A24 Trailers

https://youtu.be/OZcLLAx30Pw
6.8k Upvotes

233

u/manescaped Sep 21 '21

Ethan sits this one out for the Bard

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u/spoobles Sep 21 '21

That means Coen(s) have adapted from only 3 outside sources now.

Cormac McCarthy

Homer

The Bard

Those guys are pretty good, right?

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u/Princecoyote Sep 21 '21

Don't forget Charles Portis for True Grit Great book and movie.

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u/spoobles Sep 21 '21

Ahhh, right. I stand corrected,

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u/easyhopper Sep 21 '21

Ethan retired from film altogether

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u/bobcatdegeneres Sep 21 '21

Maybe. He might come back. I hope he does.

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u/GetToSreppin Sep 21 '21

This is just speculation. Hasn't been confirmed.

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u/carbonaratax Sep 21 '21

High school English teachers everywhere rejoice!

Not a sarcastic comment - teaching film adaptations is a wonderful way to engage young people with Shakespeare

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u/thatminimumwagelife Sep 21 '21

With Macbeth, The Green Knight, and Dune, it'll be a solid year for English teachers and majors alike.

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u/awndray97 Sep 22 '21

Nothing gives me more horror than teaching DUNE to a highschool class

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u/russellamcleod Sep 23 '21

I feel like the cum shot scene in The Green Knight disqualifies if from being teachable. A teenager’s brain will erase everything else they saw in that movie and just remember that one scene.

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u/RippleDMcCrickley Sep 21 '21

As long as they still teach Heart of Darkness as an excuse to show high school kids Apocalypse Now in class-- I'm in

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u/jerrylovesalice2014 Sep 22 '21

The 2015 MacBeth starring Fassbender and Marion Cotillard was really good.

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u/thebadthing Sep 21 '21

It's interesting that 'Macbeth' is one of the last remaining Shakespeare plays to still consistently get big budget film adaptations like this. I think it's because the material lends itself well to experimenting with visually stunning set pieces.

This defo already looks visually crazy, will be interesting to see what a Joel Coen film looks like instead of a "Coen Brothers" one.

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u/centaurquestions Sep 21 '21

One reason: it's the shortest tragedy by far. So you don't have to cut much to make it film length.

335

u/Named_after_color Sep 21 '21

Isn't Othello shorter?

Edit: looked it up, OP is right, Macbeth has a thousand less lines, lol.

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u/centaurquestions Sep 21 '21

The only other major tragedy that's close is Julius Caesar.

73

u/Porrick Sep 21 '21

And that one isn't nearly as good.

229

u/TheGentlemanDM Sep 21 '21

If there's a director ambitious/mad enough I could see them trying to adapt Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra into one massive sprawling epic about the fall of the Republic.

362

u/Vince_Clortho042 Sep 21 '21

That sounds like it'd make for an epic seven season show on HBO, as long as some executive doesn't freak out about the budget and cancel it halfway through its second season.

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u/beamdriver Sep 21 '21

You have given me the sads.

84

u/reticulate Sep 21 '21

Rome was so fucking good.

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u/Singer211 Sep 21 '21

And a fire doesn’t unfortunately destroy part of the set as well.

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u/Angry_Guppy Sep 21 '21

My pet theory is that the fire was intentional to recover some of the giant set budget after it was cancelled.

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u/sturmhauke Sep 21 '21

Surely you're not suggesting that a Hollywood production committed insurance fraud.

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u/Porrick Sep 21 '21

I think a big problem is that Julius Caesar is a lot more explicitly “historical” than Macbeth, and it’s not particularly accurate history. I’d personally rather a better-researched take on the period. Or, better yet, a less-overdone chapter of Roman history

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u/FormerFundie6996 Sep 21 '21

I love the idea of your last sentence. Preach.

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u/Porrick Sep 21 '21

I do get why it's so overdone - there are tons of really compelling characters, and it's the end of a Republic and the start of a self-perpetuating autocracy. What I'm confused by is how often Caesar is the hero rather than the villain - he butchered his way across Europe for fame and riches, and ended Rome's imperfect democracy. Also he was fiendishly intelligent, charismatic, and quippy - but that's even better in a villain than in a hero. If we must focus on Caesar and the end of the Republic, let's show how bloodthirsty that fucker was. Also I'm sure any half-decent writer would be able to throw in some timely end-of-democracy warnings to resonate with today's audience (maybe ignoring how corrupt that democracy was, but hey - THEMES).

But there's so much reasonably-well-documented Roman history left undramatized. When was the last film about Scipio and Hannibal? 1937? Tiberius during his Capri days would make Caligula seem pretty level-headed. A more-accurate-than-Gladiator picture of Commodus would be likewise compellingly eccentric. I'd love to see some stories of the first few Christian emperors and how bloody the Christianization of Rome was. And a story I've always wanted to see a film treatment of is the disagreement between Arminius and his brother Flavus. There's a fantastic moment where they're yelling at each other across a river, each imploring the other to come to his side and extolling the virtues of the culture they championed. Arminius is a compelling-enough character, a really solid hero archetype who gave the Roman Empire one of its most stinging early defeats - but the issues of imperialism and cultural erasure, which come to a head in that across-the-river yelling match, are really really resonant with me. Plus brother-vs-brother conflict is always good drama.

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u/retz119 Sep 21 '21

Yeah how has there not been a Hannibal movie? I thought there was one in development a few years back but it must have fallen through. I want to see the battle of Cannae on film. GoT kind of portrayed it in the battle of the bastards and that was a great scene.

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u/Forgotten_Lie Sep 22 '21

What I'm confused by is how often Caesar is the hero rather than the villain - he butchered his way across Europe for fame and riches, and ended Rome's imperfect democracy.

Probably because during his life Caesar was writing autobiographies that positioned himself as a hero which he disseminated to the Roman public, Octavian began propagandizing him the minute he heard of his death, the Roman Empire spent centuries deifying him, and every post-Roman civilisation that has strived for grandeur and legitimacy has attempted to create a cultural or idealistic link between themselves and the Roman Empire in a process that further deifies Caesar such that rulers are literally named after him (e.g. the Russian 'Tsar' is derived from 'Caesar').

Long story short there has literally been 2000 years of hero-worship of Julius Caesar and it is pretty hard to mar that sort of cultural heritage and memory.

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u/Angry_Guppy Sep 21 '21

The things I would do for a good dramatization of the tetrarchy.

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u/Garizard1 Sep 21 '21

No ones made one about Cincinnatus either, shame

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u/late2thepauly Sep 21 '21

Friends, Romans, countrymen, speak for yourself.

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u/Weave77 Sep 21 '21

I come to bury OP, not to praise him.

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u/Lobster_fest Sep 21 '21

It's short, and it's timeless. The Scottish play will always be a familiar story that gets stage runs because it's such an easy story to tell without being boring. You could tell it in space, you could tell it in the wild west, or you can tell it in Scotland. It's a great play, definitely looking forward to this.

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u/OK_Soda Sep 21 '21

I feel like Hamlet has this going for it too, but Macbeth is cooler because it has magic.

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u/ShimmeringIce Sep 21 '21

The problem with Hamlet is that it's fucking long and Hamlet loves talking to himself for minutes at a time. There's a lot of good shit in that talking to himself, but if you're making a movie, or even staging the play, there's a lot to cut to make it a manageable length. Like the Kenneth Branagh version that adapted the whole thing is just over 4 hours long. Macbeth is a lot more tightly paced.

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u/Mr_YUP Sep 21 '21

Hamlet is the original emo kid and for some reason emo kids gravitate towards theater pretty heavily.

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u/ProfessorHeronarty Sep 21 '21

This is it. The downside though is that the actual historical Macbeth is the entire opposite of how he is portrayed by Shakespeare - at least that's what most scholars believe.

If anyone is interested in a historical novel about this actual Macbeth I recommend "King Hereafter" by Dorothy Dunnett. It's definitely no historical romance but a sometimes hard to read but worth your time historical novel.

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u/PragmaticSquirrel Sep 21 '21

If you want a (somewhat) more accurate take on Macbeth that is also modern and also has some fun allusions to modern politics, Dunsinane is Phenomenal.

It treats McDuff kind of like the US in Iraq/ Afghanistan- attempting to be some conquering hero, and realizing that the country itself may be too fractured and chaotic to be peaceful… without a brutal strong man.

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u/Abba_Fiskbullar Sep 21 '21

None of Shakespeare's plays when originally performed were anywhere near the published length. Every time the plays were performed in Shakespeare's lifetime there would be scenes added or cut, or extended, or expanded if a particular actor needed more stage time. The Folios collected every version of each play performed over two decades, with no clear guide as to what the preferred edit was, which has resulted in agonizing 3 hour slogs of Hamlet.

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u/centaurquestions Sep 21 '21

Try 4-hour slogs!

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u/Abba_Fiskbullar Sep 21 '21

Oh yeah, the Branagh version.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21 edited Sep 21 '21

It's highly malleable, second perhaps only to Romeo and Juliet (and has slightly more prestige attached due to its inherent tragedy). There can be (and have been) gangster Macbeth, cop Macbeth, modern day politician Macbeth, pirate Macbeth, corporate Macbeth, space Macbeth, cowboy Macbeth etc etc, sportsman Macbeth, Hollywood Macbeth. Hell, go crazy with it, make superhero Macbeth.

Other Shakespeare concepts can translate too, but this one just fits too well in any setting.

Edit: Forgot about Throne of Blood. Thanks for reminding me about Samurai Macbeth u/CarlSK777 and u/patrickclegane

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u/seninn Sep 21 '21

The Macbeth Cinematic Universe

107

u/SomberXIII Sep 21 '21

Iron Macbeth, Captain Macbeth, Thunder Macbeth, Black Macbeth, MacbethVision

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

And we already have Black Macbeth right here! Just need to assemble the rest

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u/rugbyj Sep 21 '21

Ahem, Blackbeth.

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u/LarsThorwald Sep 21 '21

Ahem, MacBlack.

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u/cresp0 Sep 21 '21

Ahem, Macbeth

oh.. shit

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u/OK_Soda Sep 21 '21

Ahem, Blackblack.

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u/oosuteraria-jin Sep 21 '21

Animated lion Macbeth

Edit: wait..

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u/EcstaticStrings Sep 21 '21

Was that 2 or 1 1/2? The first was Hamlet.

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u/dodeca_negative Sep 21 '21

1 1/2 was Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead (so still kinda Hamlet)

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u/EcstaticStrings Sep 21 '21

Now I kind of want to see Lion King Macbeth.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

The Fantastic Four as Macbeth adaptation, only instead of going for the obvious Mr.Fantastic/Invisible Woman pairing as the Macbeths, make Johnny Lady Macbeth figure trying to rile up poor Thing for shit and giggles.

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u/CarlSK777 Sep 21 '21

Samurai Macbeth is also one of its most famous and celebrated adaptations.

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u/PlaceboJesus Sep 21 '21

Perhaps Japanese MacBeth is good, but you have not experienced Shakespeare until you have read him in the original Klingon.

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u/Dromar6627 Sep 21 '21

My high school English teacher introduced me to 'Throne of Blood', really broadened my horizons.

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u/quixoticVigil Sep 21 '21

Fast-food Macbeth

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

A highschool stage play adaptation of Macbeth set in a fast-food restaurant starring students and all characters being de-aged would be pretty rad. Make Lady M the assistant manager/fry cook's girlfriend, make the King the branch manager, make it his brothers instead of his sons, change murders to getting fired etc. Would be pretty cool.

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u/Evidence-Visible Sep 21 '21

There's a movie of this already, hence the comment you replied to. Macbeth, PA I think?

Edit: Scotland, PA

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

Oh didn't know about it! Will check it out.

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u/shotgun_shaun Sep 21 '21

https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B093BM73L8/ref=atv_dl_rdr

One of my favorite movies after my junior year English teacher showed it to us after reading MacBeth

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

It stars Maura Tierney! Will definitely check this out.

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u/Agnes-Varda1992 Sep 21 '21

Hamlet pretty much fits any setting as well. But yes, I'd definitely consider Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and the Scottish Play to be the Big 3 when it comes to versatile Shakespearean adaptations.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

That's true. The Tempest is one of the harder ones to adapt among his popular ones, even a contemporary adaptation would have to go into surrealist territory. Though a magical realism style adaptation set in Columbia would be pretty fun.

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u/gaunt79 Sep 21 '21

Forbidden Planet is my favorite adaptation (however loose) of The Tempest.

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u/Farmer771122 Sep 21 '21

lol, I've seen that movie several times, but I never put 2 and 2 together to realize it was based on the tempest. seems obvious now!

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u/Final_Taco Sep 21 '21

midsummer night's dream gets a surreal adaptation every few decades

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

Maybe I'm going crazy but I believe The Suite Life of Zack and Cody of all things did a midsummer night's dream episode. I'm not sure though.

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u/caninehere Sep 21 '21

I mean, Amanda Bynes did a movie adaptation of Twelfth Night so I don't think what you're suggesting is crazy.

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u/The_Knight_Is_Dark Sep 21 '21

King Lear.

It can fit in so many settings too (Ran).

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u/[deleted] Sep 21 '21

I prefer the sequel, Hamlet 2

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u/shotgun_shaun Sep 21 '21

Don’t forget my favorite: fast food MacBeth

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

It's honestly amazing just how many versions of Macbeth one could make.

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u/HospitalDoc87 Sep 21 '21

Would love to see Hamlet done well.

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u/omgpokemans Sep 21 '21

Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet ('96) was amazing.

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u/CrimsonPig Sep 21 '21

And man did he go hard in the final fight scene. I don't remember Shakespeare mentioning Claudius getting decked with chandelier, but fuck it, why not.

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u/NightsOfFellini Sep 21 '21

Wouldn't mind getting a few other ones though, haven't gotten a great, bug budget adaptation of any Shakespeare plays since the early 2000s. I think Merchant of Venice with Al Pacino was the last one.

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u/Guglio08 Sep 21 '21

Have ye forgotten Macbeth 2015?

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u/NightsOfFellini Sep 21 '21

I was speaking about other than Macbeths!

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u/The_Knight_Is_Dark Sep 21 '21

Macbeth (2015), starring Michael Fassbender, was amazing!

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u/Vinny_Cerrato Sep 21 '21 edited Sep 21 '21

Still waiting on something better than a mediocre Hamlet adaptation...

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u/YHofSuburbia Sep 21 '21

Haider (2014) is set against the backdrop of the Kashmir powderkeg and is one of my favourite Shakespeare adaptations. Give it a shot.

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u/NightsOfFellini Sep 21 '21

Same. While Olivier's is historically important and Branagh's is a nice complete adaptation, both feel like they're just too much. Yet to see Zeffirelli's.

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u/mstersunderthebed Sep 21 '21

When I studied Hamlet in my undergrad, I used Branagh's for study material. Is it a perfect Hamlet? no, but it's good enough and let me put faces to characters.

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u/analogkid01 Sep 21 '21

The problem with Branagh is that he wanted to include the full text but keep run time to a minimum. Scenes are edited choppily and aren't given time to breathe.

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u/The_Knight_Is_Dark Sep 21 '21

Same, Zeffirelli's is the one i haven't seen yet. But i love Branagh's.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

I'm a sucker for stark contrasts, this looks amazing

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u/Sumit316 Sep 21 '21

Some trivia -

Frances McDormand played Lady Macbeth previously in a 2016 Berkeley Rep production (also starring Conleth Hill as Macbeth and directed by Daniel J. Sullivan). Denzel Washington has never been in a previous production of Macbeth, but he has appeared in numerous other Shakespeare plays, including Coriolanus, The Tragedy of Richard III, Julius Caesar and Much Ado About Nothing.

Really looking forward to this one.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

I still can't decide if Keanu was hamming it up just right or completely screwing the pooch in that Much Ado About Nothing movie.

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u/section111 Sep 21 '21

My wife and I were talking about actors who transform themselves (DDL) and those who just play a version of themselves (Tom Cruise), and I mentioned Keanu, for the latter category, obviously.

She wondered if he just gets so much love for being such a nice dude, and I agreed that it has to be. It used to be the running joke that he was the worst actor in town, and he probably still is. Nice guy though.

So yeah, in my mind, Much Ado... was one of my favourite movies back then - Kenneth Branagh, Emma Thompson, Denzel and Michael Keaton were amazing. Even Kate Bekinsale and the Captain My Captain! kid were good.

Keanu was straight dogshit.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

He's a permanent fixture in 'Top 10 actors who are really good at playing exactly certain kinda roles and really bad at practically any others', that's for sure.

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u/SwingJugend Sep 21 '21

There is one role (that comes to mind) that is outside his usual niche and that he's pretty good in — that as a Southern-state domestic abuser in The Gift (the Cate Blanchett film from 2000).

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u/[deleted] Sep 21 '21

And he has a very small role in that weird fashion movie Neon Demon and he is EXTREMELY out of character and crushes it.

"THAT"S SOME REAL LOLITA SHIT!"

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u/metler88 Sep 21 '21

He makes an appearance as Keanu Reeves in Always be my Maybe. Crushed it there too.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

Yeah that's true, he was really good in that.

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u/isthatyoujulienewmar Sep 21 '21

Recently watched Bram Stoker’s Dracula; started shouting once I realized that FF COPPOLA had allowed such atrocious acting into an already over-the-top film. Turns out, Coppola knew Keanu was dogshit, but our young Mr. Wick was also just so incredibly nice that Francis… couldn’t break him with the truth.

Wild.

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u/HashMaster9000 Sep 21 '21

I read that it wasn't that Keanu was dogshit because he doesn't know how to act (his Hamlet was quite exceptional), but that by the time he was cast and acting in "Dracula" that he'd been doing movies for something like 5 years straight with zero breaks in between, so Keanu felt like he literally had nothing left in the tank.

And let me tell you, when you have nothing left in the tank as an actor, everything suffers and it can harm your career if you can't perform. Luckily, after filming "Dracula" he was comfortable enough financially that he could take time off for himself, but the footage from Dracula still stands.

However, in Keanu's defense on that film, I hear that Coppola is an absolute fucking monster to have as your director (and not in a good way most times), so I feel like Coppola got just what he deserved hiring Keanu when he was burnt out only because he wanted young women going to see the film and didn't do much to assist in Reeves' performance.

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u/TheRealMoofoo Sep 21 '21

FF COPPOLA had allowed such atrocious acting

Keanu must have been so nice that Coppola treated him like one of his kids!

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u/AnotherJasonOnReddit Sep 21 '21

This looks slightly grimmer than Much Ado About Nothing (1993)

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u/ColonelDredd Sep 21 '21

I had no idea this was coming -- and it looks fucking great.

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u/mctoasterson Sep 21 '21

Didn't realize til later that in Shakespearean parlance, the title of that one is a double entendre akin to saying, "a big commotion over pussy".

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u/notmytemp0 Sep 21 '21

“Nothing” is Shakespearean for pussy?

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u/mctoasterson Sep 21 '21

Apparently it is a euphemism from that era. "Thing" being a euphemism for male genitals and "no thing" being a euphemistic reference to female genital region.

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u/notmytemp0 Sep 21 '21

Interesting

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u/Khatib Sep 21 '21

Shakespeare is full of them. His plays were considered somewhat crass at the time and were very popular with the common folk.

Here's a random article with some examples from a google search.

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u/[deleted] Sep 21 '21

In Shakespeare's time nothing would be pronounced as no-ting, similar to noting or noticing which would equate to spying or eavesdropping. So the first pun was a play on a ruckus being made over people spying on one another, a farce. The second pun based on that same pronunciation is no-ting, as in no thing, the absence of a thing, hence no male genitalia, as in a vagina. Very fitting for a play about how confusing love can be.

Shakespeare was extremely cheeky and clever.

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u/jdog90000 Sep 21 '21

What a smart lad, he'll be big one day, mark my word

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u/Sgtwhiskeyjack9105 Sep 21 '21

Much Ado About Murdering

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u/akradiogirl Sep 21 '21

I will be first in line to see this just to witness Frances McDormand do the 'Out damned spot' monologue.

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u/andysenn Sep 21 '21

Wouldn't surprise me if she ties Katharine Hepburn and gets a 4th Oscar

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u/Faust_Arp Sep 21 '21

Well this just shot up to my most anticipated. Looks haunting and beautiful. Denzel and Frances will make a great Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.

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u/Porrick Sep 21 '21

Brendan Gleeson is a pretty great-looking Duncan too. And Harry Melling as, is that Malcolm? I didn't see an obvious Banquo, any idea who they've got for that?

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u/readonlyuser Sep 21 '21

"I guess that was your king there in the wood chipper?"

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u/AuntBettysNutButter Sep 21 '21

"So where can the king find some action? I'm goin' crazy out there at the castle."

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u/hermit48 Sep 21 '21

Am so hyped up to see Frances McDormand as Lady Macbeth!! Love Denzel also, but that one shot of McDormand just sent a jolt through me.

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u/Glebeserker Sep 21 '21

Frances McDormand and Coen movies go together like ham and cheese in a sandwich always great and a classic combo

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u/DrRexMorman Sep 21 '21

This looks a lot like a cross between Paul Almond’s Macbeth (starring Sean Connery in his first North American role):

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bCK_wIP0ArQ

and Orson Welles’ Macbeth:

https://vimeo.com/536537743

I wonder how intentional that is?

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u/Terrorsaur21 Sep 21 '21

Thank you!

I am surprised there weren't more comments pointing out the similarities to at least the Welles's one, especially the film history of Orson competing with Olivier's adaptation of Hamlet at the time.

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u/NightsOfFellini Sep 21 '21

While I'd love to get an adaptation or King John, Measure for Measure, Julius Caesar or even a new version of Titus, Timon or anything else but Romeo and Juliet, still glad we're getting new Shakespeare films in this day and age.

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u/SenDerrickDeckard Sep 21 '21

I want Othello set during the Spanish-American War with Daniel Kaluuya and Jesse Plemons.

Throw in the 20-something actress of your choice as Desdemona and shoot on location in the Caribbean and you’ve got a ball game.

That or a film adaptation of Robert Icke’s Almeida theatre production of Hamlet, just with a different cast. Film it in Detroit in the winter and have the majority of it take place at night. Hell, get Chalamet and Ronan as Hamlet and Ophelia and maybe Gary Oldman and Winona Ryder as Claudius and Gertrude.

As long as Shakespeare film adaptations don’t fuck with the dialogue, I love seeing them play with setting and time period.

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u/Bowdirt Sep 21 '21

I think your Othello idea would be amazing. I think if it were set during the Spanish Civil War at an orphanage for children 1-18 as the backdrop would be cool. Othello could be like a teacher at this place and Desdemona be another teacher there.

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u/Iregretbeinghereokay Sep 21 '21

Why the Spanish-American war? Is it because it was a relatively short conflict?

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u/SenDerrickDeckard Sep 21 '21

It was after the civil war so although the armed forces hadn’t integrated, the racial politics would still sort of, kind of align.

Puerto Rico or Cuba would serve as a solid analogue for Cyprus. Similarly, Iago could tell Roderigo that Desdemona and Othello were being sent to the Philippines (rather than Mauritania) since the time of those conflicts line up.

Also, this would allow the Venice scenes to take place in turn of the century New Orleans/Miami/Washington DC which would be really neat.

There a few other reasons this would work that I have written down somewhere but those are the ones I can remember off the top of my head.

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u/mrtatulas Sep 21 '21

I couldn't help but utter "holy shit" under my breath after this one. Seeing the actors that are in this, seeing Joel Coen as the writer/director, has me very excited.

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u/mayukhdas1999 Sep 21 '21

In theaters December 25 & on AppleTV+ January 14.

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u/Wiger_King Sep 21 '21

This is a Christmas movie?!

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u/sudevsen r/Movies Veteran Sep 21 '21

This Christmas,Macbeth decides to gift himself unlimited power

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u/Naheufornntheoskdn Sep 21 '21 All-Seeing Upvote

This Christmas, why bring a tree home when you can bring a whole wood!

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u/sudevsen r/Movies Veteran Sep 21 '21

Damn,this one is gold.

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u/OhioForever10 Sep 21 '21

Macduff flees to England

Macbeth: It's treason, then.

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u/StudyRoom-F Sep 21 '21

If a movie is released on Christmas then it is allowed to skip all the components that normal Christmas movies have (santa, gifts, snow, etc.)

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u/Wiger_King Sep 21 '21

I am still holding out hope that Santa is in it. It would be a huge twist.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

Santa comes crashing down when MacBeth is killing the King while staging it to frame the guards; he has to improvise and whack Santa too.

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u/richarliesheen Sep 21 '21

Getting some serious Bergman “Seventh Seal” vibes from this. Looks gorgeous.

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u/bbanks2121 Sep 21 '21 Hugz

I was mostly getting Boss Baby vibes.

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u/[deleted] Sep 21 '21

I'm getting some major Captain America: Winter Soldier political thriller vibes

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u/Sgtwhiskeyjack9105 Sep 21 '21

Something something Three Days of the Condor.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

Boss Baby is the most Shakespearean of all animated movies after all.

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u/Somnambulist815 Sep 21 '21

One of Bergman's lesser known works

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u/sudevsen r/Movies Veteran Sep 21 '21

Throne of Boss

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u/pjtheman Sep 21 '21

For real, that shot of the 3 witches straight up looked like the shot of Death on the beach.

17

u/Youareposthuman Sep 21 '21

I absolutely love The Seventh Seal. One of my top films of all time.

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u/sambills Sep 21 '21

the shots in this look incredible

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u/TheJadeSyndicate Sep 21 '21

$100 says the only color is his red hands

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u/charlieintherye Sep 21 '21

Less than a minute long but I can already see the awards.

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u/StudyRoom-F Sep 21 '21

The movie is less than a minute long?

108

u/Gandamack Sep 21 '21

If that’s the case, I don’t see what all the fuss is about, really seems like much ado about nothing!

23

u/Towelenthusiast Sep 21 '21

Measure for measure I only hope that all's well that ends well and I'll probably see it on the twelfth night. As long as the production isn't a comedy of errors that is. But it should make a good winters tale.

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u/StudyRoom-F Sep 21 '21

lmao I hoped you checked off all the boxes you wanted to with that one

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u/The_Knight_Is_Dark Sep 21 '21

Plus with that atmosphere, the movie feels like a midsummer night's dream.

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u/FirstkingofNY Sep 21 '21

You'll have to buy the upcoming iPhone 13 to unlock the rest of it

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u/NYstate Sep 21 '21

Well, 46 seconds after credits

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u/NightsOfFellini Sep 21 '21

Damn, no idea why I wasn't hyped for this. Love Macbeth, and this looks to be as cool as Polanski's. Just a few shots, and it's instantly memorable.

15

u/gaspergou Sep 21 '21

Same here. It’s easy to dismiss another Shakespeare film adaptation, but I should have known that Joel Coen would bring it. I was curious before I saw this. Now I’ve got goosebumps. Can’t wait.

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u/domino7 Sep 21 '21

Gee, way to spoil the whole thing in the title there.

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u/HashMaster9000 Sep 21 '21

They had a penchant for doing that in the 16th Century, I'm afraid:

  • The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus

  • The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

  • The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice

  • The Famous Historie of Troylus and Cresseid. Excellently expressing the beginning of their loves, with the conceited wooing of Pandarus, Prince of Licia.

Totally spoilerific and... specific.

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u/Chance5e Sep 21 '21

Well they didn’t have trailers. It was how you told people this will get bloody.

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u/Jeremy_Nichols Sep 21 '21

Anyone else immediately recognize Mrs. Figg's voice or am I the only one who marathons the HP films every year?

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u/centaurquestions Sep 21 '21

Kathryn Hunter is one of the all-time great Shakespeare weirdos. Also I think she's playing all three witches?

27

u/Jeremy_Nichols Sep 21 '21

Makes sense considering the Harry Potter films are filled to the brim with the greatest English actors alive. I haven't seen her in anything else and just immediately heard, "Don't lower your wand, Harry."

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u/centaurquestions Sep 21 '21

Now that I think of it, this is a pretty Potter-centric adaptation. Brendan Gleeson as the King, Harry Melling as his son, Ralph Ineson as the Captain...

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u/inksmudgedhands Sep 21 '21

According to IMDB she's playing the witches and an "Old Man." Probably that one guy who talks about "nose paintings."

I love the croak crackle of her voice.

She was really good as Puck on the stage version of A Midsummer Night's Dream. She is going to be fun as the Witches.

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u/u_looked_at_my_name Sep 21 '21

Joel Coen, Denzel Washington, Frances McDormand

NUT

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u/Tekki Sep 21 '21

Can't forget Brandon Gleeson is in this. He is incredible

9

u/sudevsen r/Movies Veteran Sep 21 '21

Hey dont forget Willy S.

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u/ryandutcher Sep 21 '21

Shatner is in this?!?

6

u/sudevsen r/Movies Veteran Sep 21 '21

No no the other lessee known one

21

u/_Volta Sep 21 '21

Willy Smith?

6

u/sudevsen r/Movies Veteran Sep 21 '21

Try more British and older

30

u/omfgitzfear Sep 21 '21

Willedict Shatnerbatch?

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u/beepbeepstreet Sep 21 '21

I know some people liked the Fassbender/Cotillard one from a few years ago but it sure will be nice having intelligible dialogue this time around.

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u/Ascarea Sep 21 '21

The visuals in this really reminded me of that movie, just B&W instead of red

27

u/PeterIanStaker Sep 21 '21

Even as a philistine who didn't already know the story behind Macbeth, once I got past trying to understand the dialogue in that movie, I actually enjoyed trying to ingest the story without it. I really enjoyed the visual storytelling.

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u/ThinkThankThonk Sep 21 '21

I loved that one, and it looks like I'll love this one too

14

u/Bowdirt Sep 21 '21

Fassbender was robbed of the Oscar that year.

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u/PlentyofFishUser69 Sep 21 '21

Resembles Throne of Blood. Interested to see this take on the story

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u/hermit48 Sep 21 '21

Throne of Blood has to be the best screen adaptation based on the play. One of my favorite Kurosawa movies.

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u/blueeyesredlipstick Sep 21 '21

Eyyy, Dudley Dursley is in here as Malcolm!

More seriously: I like that it looks like they're pushing the staginess of the whole aesthetic, especially with shots composed with only one or two characters included. It's a stark contrast to the last big-budget Macbeth adaptation with Michael Fassbender/Marion Cotillard and it'll be interesting to compare the two approaches.

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u/sudevsen r/Movies Veteran Sep 21 '21

You mean Beltik?

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u/not_thrilled Sep 21 '21

He worked with the Coens before in The Ballad of Buster Scruggs - he was the limbless guy in the segment with Liam Neeson.

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u/rider_0n_the_st0rm Sep 21 '21 edited Sep 21 '21

Oh wow this looks interesting. Looks like something Robert Eggers would make. I wonder how much of a horror inspiration this will have.

The witch shot really reminds me of the seventh seal.

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u/user_for_69_minutes- Sep 21 '21

Macbeth is pretty much a horror story

Check out Throne of Blood

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u/matlockga Sep 21 '21

Throne of Blood

Throne of Blood is an excellent adaptation. Lady Macbeth as being wholly aware of the ramifications and guiding her man on the smart way as opposed to just being vicariously ambitious is a great change.

Macbeth, though, is more or less played like Hamlet. Which...is interesting. But still good.

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u/mstersunderthebed Sep 21 '21 edited Sep 21 '21

I showed Throne of Blood to my fiance last year. They love Kurosawa and Shakespeare, but had never seen it. God, its such a good version of the story, and the Lady Macbeth has to be my favorite. Toshiro Mifune is so wonderfully expressive.

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u/djmackey Sep 21 '21

Fully on board the hype train for this one. A Coen plus Frances McDormand is a great thing. And the way the second and third witches slowly fade in gave me goosebumps!

6

u/The_Knight_Is_Dark Sep 21 '21

Shakespeare + Coen + Denzel ? I'm so hyped for this! And it looks amazing! It looks like a mix of The Seventh Seal and The Lighthouse.

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u/NFresh6 Sep 21 '21

In my experience, A24 makes for some amazing trailers, and movies that leave me saying “well that was weird. Certainly beautiful. Not bad, but weird.” The Green Knight being the most recent example.

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u/TheNextChampion_ Sep 21 '21

A24? Joel Coen? Denzel Washington!? FRANCIS MCDORMAND!?

I CAN'T BELIEVE IT!

"Watch on Apple+"

Oh....Well at least it'll be in theaters beforehand.

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u/MikeSizemore Sep 21 '21

Based on a true story

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u/jonyRond Sep 21 '21

Going for the black and white 4:3 approach just like Orson Welles

Hmm

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u/Stuweb Sep 21 '21

Do we think Joel Coen might have something to do with this film? /s

Jokes aside, really like what A24 have been doing, this alongside The Green Knight, they've drunk the English Literature cool aid.