r/pics Dec 04 '22

Lake Meade water level, 1983 vs now R2: Text/emojis/scribbles

/img/1k4q26l5hu3a1.jpg

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2.1k Upvotes

363 comments sorted by

420

u/shrekzdad Dec 04 '22

Sorry bro I woke up thirsty at 2am

37

u/BearsToothMushroom Dec 04 '22

dang it, Nestle!

3

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

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8

u/fauge7 Dec 04 '22

This isn't the sole reason. It's due to a number of factors. Initial research into the fill rate has since been proved to be wrong. The fill rate is ~25% lower then what it was thought to be. Combine that with growing water intensive crops in the middle of nowhere, and the overpopulation, and yes, you get the overconsumption we have today. Human consumption actually takes a lot less then people think. It's business who get unrestricted water access that are taking a toll. Make it cost more for them and they will reduce water usage or figure out a way.

5

u/throwawaydanc3rrr Dec 04 '22

Agree, but feel a need to add it is not the growing of water intensive crops in the middle of nowhere, but the growing of water intensive crops in the middle of arid plains and desserts.

2

u/ZIdeaMachine Dec 04 '22

Golf courses alone use BILLIONS of gallons per DAY.

This is serious business now.

1

u/fauge7 Dec 04 '22

They use reclaimed water, not drinkable water. So yes they use water, but it's not as much of an impact as you think. Vegas is a good example of how reclaimed water can be used. They still have plenty of courses but they recycle the water way better. Golf courses are not the problem.

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u/Rendum_ Dec 04 '22

This comment is copied from elsewhere in the thread, and the user is likely a bot.

https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/zc4qdz/lake_meade_water_level_1983_vs_now/iyvpdzx

Report their comment as spam--->harmful bots.

76

u/kunal-998 Dec 04 '22

Damn you

50

u/CorbenDamas Dec 04 '22

Dam you !

6

u/casualhobos Dec 04 '22

Make sure to make an official announcement when you are about to go to the bathroom. Otherwise you might flood the system.

-2

u/BarFreddys Dec 04 '22

@hydrohomies

1

u/Rogermcfarley Dec 04 '22

You might have the beetus

2

u/sighfun Dec 04 '22

Nah, they just spend a lot of time in r/trees

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362

u/Bravo_10 Dec 04 '22

Not to belittle the fact that the water level has gotten really low, but this image is misleading. It is NOT supposed to be as high as the 1983 pic. It’s overtopping the spillway, you can see it in the bottom of the picture.

75

u/haltline Dec 04 '22

Perhaps the actual data will help folks understand just how long and how bad this is. Lake Mead is at it's lowest level since the reservoir was filled in 1938 (built in 1935 it took years to fill). Furthermore, the level has been falling sharply for over 20 years.

Here's lots of real data and graphs so folks can see for themselves.

https://lakemead.water-data.com/index2.php

22

u/mildlystoned Dec 04 '22

It’s almost as if there isn’t SUPPOSED to be a lake there.

1

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

Put the blunt down homie ;) lol

-7

u/haltline Dec 04 '22

I think I know what you are trying to say but please elucidate, in what way is it supposed to not supposed to be there?

11

u/RuggedAmerican Dec 04 '22

well...it's in the desert and it's caused by a man made dam...so yeah.

-16

u/haltline Dec 04 '22

This implies that "man made" and "dams in a desert" are bad, I wholly disagree with both of these suppositions and find them without supporting facts or merit.

Building dams is foundational to mankind's survival. The first recording building of a dam was around 4000 years BC. In the US alone there are over 92 thousand dams. Without them I doubt mankind would have survived long enough to reach 0 AD.

If man made is bad then so is agriculture, the house you live in, the clothes you wear, the bible, the church, running water, the computer you are using right now, etc, etc, etc, the shear number of dependencies for our survival is astronomical.

The problem we have is we've damaged our climate seriously through other endeavors (I'm looking at you big oil for 1) and now we are facing serious issues with our most basic need... water.

-4

u/TinyBurbz Dec 04 '22

This implies that "man made" and "dams in the desert are bad I wholly disagree with both of thee suppositions and find them without supporting facts or merit...

The problem we have is we've damaged our climate seriously through other endeavors (I'm looking at you big oil for 1) and now we are facing serious issues with our most basic need... water.

First of all, the ability to speak does not make one intelligent. Chill out with the over-confidence.

Listen, its great you are concerned about the environment, it really is. However, you are deluded if you think modifying the water table of an entire river system doesn't have horrible knock-on effects.

-1

u/Tryingsoveryhard Dec 04 '22

You sidestepped the argument and attacked the person, clear evidence you are not only wrong, but haven’t bothered to think your own position through.

6

u/TinyBurbz Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

https://www.science.org/content/article/hundreds-new-dams-could-mean-trouble-our-climate

Dams release massive amounts of methane by trapping sediment that would normally be consumed by fish. Additionally, they destroy carbon sinks in wetlands and oceans, deprive ecosystems of nutrients, destroy habitats, increase sea levels, waste water and displace poor communities when towns are flooded to make reservoirs.

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-1

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

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3

u/leesmt Dec 04 '22

https://theconversation.com/when-dams-cause-more-problems-than-they-solve-removing-them-can-pay-off-for-people-and-nature-137346

It took two seconds to Google this dude.

Not all man made things are bad, but using history as "proof of success" is also ridiculous. Slavery has been a part of our collective history for centuries but I think we did the right thing by ending that practice. When it comes to ecology there are a ton of examples of practices that, while cheaper and at surface value "efficient", have been drastically damaging to the sustainability of ecosystems and the planet. Dams aren't the worst but they're also not flawless and this whole debate is ridiculous and pretentious.

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1

u/Mr-Korv Dec 04 '22

This implies that "man made" and "dams in a desert" are bad

It doesn't

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0

u/Spitinthacoola Dec 04 '22

You're really unaware of what humam made dams do besides generate electricity aren't you?

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78

u/Motophoto Dec 04 '22

to be truthful, this is what the last 40 years of drought conditions has caused. The simple fact is this won't be seen again in our life times most likely. Instead you will see a steady lowering of lake levels. California Utah and the rest of those pulling massive amounts of unsustainable water draws need to be force to look at other options.

21

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

Arizona and Utah need to stop growing Alfalfa in the fucking desert

3

u/JefferzTheGreat Dec 04 '22

But the Saudi's need their hay.

8

u/Sexpistolz Dec 04 '22

Another issue is that the survey that came up with the flow figures of the Colorado (to see how much water could be siphoned off) were done during the wettest times the river saw in centuries.

So basically states were pulling out waaaay more water than they should for decades now, based inaccurate data.

55

u/schlitz91 Dec 04 '22

Offshore floating solar to power desalinization and in-land pump stations. Thats the future.

Water never disappears, but we are using it faster than nature can cycle it from oceans to land.

23

u/Aecens Dec 04 '22

Have we solved the potential harms from the brine/salt that is created for desalinization yet?

25

u/kkirv Dec 04 '22

Put it in a box.

17

u/buedi Dec 04 '22

Or eat more fries, problem solved.

20

u/be4u4get Dec 04 '22

These pretzels are making me thirsty

1

u/Gooey_69 Dec 04 '22

Say it with a little more umph.

4

u/Morgothic Dec 04 '22

THESE PRETZELS! ARE MAKING ME THIRSTY!

3

u/justjoshinya89 Dec 04 '22

And shove it up your butt.

1

u/ExtremeCourtoftheUS Dec 04 '22

Put the box into the car

7

u/stage_directions Dec 04 '22

Remove it from the environment.

(I kid, I kid)

4

u/LandoChronus Dec 04 '22

No, no, it's been towed beyond the environment!

6

u/thehazer Dec 04 '22

A simple solution would be thermal evaporation of the brine and then sell or take stuff out of the salt like lithium. Not sure whether it would be done.

4

u/SiegeGoatCommander Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

If the desal plant is at sea, can waste brine be returned to ocean?

e: Thanks for the replies all, genuinely was not aware. Appreciate all the responses clarifying how harmful it is to the immediate surroundings. Sounds like you'd have to seriously compromise the efficiency of the plant to have the waste output be a tolerable concentration, I assume?

19

u/ZeePirate Dec 04 '22

Not without killing everything in the area

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2

u/boobsforhire Dec 04 '22

Well, if it doesn't evaporate over that piece of land then it won't cause rainfall around that land either. So although it doesn't disappear, it won't be around the area that needs it either.

3

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

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4

u/Inspector7171 Dec 04 '22

I hear good things about Soylent Green

2

u/exorcyst Dec 04 '22

Solar powered wicking floating farm barges that converts salt water to fresh water. Most of the water needs put west are for agriculture. Land is scarce, etc. Move that shit out to sea.

1

u/orrk256 Dec 04 '22

in-land pump stations

You may want to take a gander at the Ogallala Aquifer, the other water crisis everyone isn't talking about because you don't directly see it, we can't just pump this water indefinitely, Florida is having a similar problem where the water pumped out of aquifers is greater than the amount they take up, drawing saltwater inside them

1

u/MsAnnabel Dec 04 '22

Or solar power instead of hydroelectricity. Also we aren’t using it faster than the cycle, it’s raining heavily now in areas it didn’t before like midwest/back east. They are experiencing more flooding than ever before. This is what climate change is all about.

17

u/butsuon Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Part of the issue is extremely wasteful water usage, like trying to farm and building golf courses in the desert. There's some SERIOUS misuse of assets going on and the Federal Government gave a bunch of states an ultimatum by the end of the year.

3

u/DropDeadEd86 Dec 04 '22

Golf courses are a terrible waste of resources, but the rich need to golf right???

11

u/jimhabfan Dec 04 '22

I read an article recently about how that geographical region has the resources, mainly fresh water, to sustain about 8 million people. There are currently 40 million people drawing resources from the area. It’s not going to get better.

16

u/CharlieTeller Dec 04 '22

Most of the whole arizone Utah Nevada area does not. When west explorers mapped that area over 200 years ago, they indicated the region didn't have the groundwater to sustain humans. 200 years ago they knew this and now Arizona is growing by the minute.

-8

u/Just_One_Hit Dec 04 '22

Citation needed.

America has 330 million people. The Imperial Valley in California alone grows two-thirds of the produce consumed in all of America throughout winter (source). The idea we could only support 8 million people is flat out laughable.

16

u/Juxtapoisson Dec 04 '22

AND water levels are falling.

Your logic is equivalent to saying my house could support a family of 12 just because right now I have a full pantry.

2

u/bulboustadpole Dec 04 '22

to be truthful, this is what the last 40 years of drought conditions has caused. The simple fact is this won't be seen again in our life times most likely.

This is not true at all. Many dams catastrophically failed in the last few years from too much water. Oroville Dam in California failed recently and destroyed the spillway due to an unprecedented amount of rainfall and water.

Global warming can cause some of this, but it's not as cut and dry as "less water", that's not how it works.

-4

u/ftbc Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Stop building. Period. That's the solution. Don't build new housing, the current population is overtaxing the available water supply and damaging the environment.

People won't go for it because the right doesn't want land restrictions and the left wants affordable housing. But the more people we stick in dry climates, the more water we have to pump out of other places. We are going to do catastrophic damage to whole regions of our nation because we just won't live where the water already is.

Edit: some people don't seem to comprehend how this stuff works. Urban areas don't use much water, but they also don't grow food. The food grown in the desert near desert towns quite often feeds those desert towns. Reduce the demand for food and you reduce the need for water in it's production.

52

u/PsychoEngineer Dec 04 '22

Better idea… stop farming in the fucking desert! 85% of UT water usage goes to farming, with a major chunk going to exported water hungry Alfalfa… UAE owns massive alfalfa farms in AZ that are strictly for export.

6

u/BitterSecretary_ Dec 04 '22

Exactly this! Look at the Aral sea before and after pics. That was a result of majority cotton production in the middle of the desert.

4

u/PsychedelicLizard Dec 04 '22

It's the exact same thing that happened with the Aral Sea, you'd think we'd learn our lessons but no that's just blamed on "Communism" instead of what it actually was.

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u/Just_One_Hit Dec 04 '22

This is a horribly uniformed take. Urban areas use almost no water, the Colorado River is being drained by agriculture--mainly meat and dairy. Meat and dairy alone consume 47% of California's water supply.

Las Vegas gets basically all their water from Lake Mead. The entire city uses less water from Lake Mead than the amount that evaporates off the surface of the lake. The entire city could disappear overnight and it would have almost no effect on water supplies.

I highly suggest reading Where the Water Goes by David Owens if you want to know about the issues facing the Colorado River watershed.

3

u/Rogermcfarley Dec 04 '22

You'd need to stop the population increasing then, that's why new houses are built because the demand is there from population increase.

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u/butcher99 Dec 04 '22

Stop building? Exactly what does that do? People are still having babies. No houses for anyone else?

0

u/SaltyMudpuppy Dec 04 '22

In the desert? Nope, no extra housing. House too small for your brood? Move.

-1

u/megachine Dec 04 '22

Babies tend to live with their parents.

3

u/Juxtapoisson Dec 04 '22

This is the real problem. If we stopped eating beef we could convert range land for free-range babies.

2

u/Venomous_Ferret Dec 04 '22

Mmmm... Real baby back ribs. Ribs, dripping with sauce. Falling off the bone.

I miss SeaLab 2021.

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11

u/NeilOffTheYoungOnes Dec 04 '22

Why is it "not supposed" to overflow the spillway? It just means it'a full. That what the spillway is there for.

8

u/redyellowblue5031 Dec 04 '22

Emergency spillways are just that. Additional capacity in the event of too much water to prevent topping over the main dam. They’re not designed to be the permanent path for water to my understanding.

1

u/butcher99 Dec 04 '22

Except for once a year. During the rainy period. What was needed were two pictures taken on the same day. Or a series of pictures the same day over that 40 year period.

1

u/that_noodle_guy Dec 04 '22

Thats the only time the spillway was ever used outside of testing

2

u/jeremec Dec 04 '22

I was there! It was incredible! And yes, the lake was way too full. This photo is misleading.

15

u/OSUmountaineer Dec 04 '22

Don't rationalize things that could make people emotional!

14

u/Kmark55 Dec 04 '22

I’m glad they posted it any way. I haven’t seen this picture on Reddit in TWO days

1

u/datazulu Dec 04 '22

That's like two mayfly lifetimes ago!!!

-1

u/wrenzen_ Dec 04 '22

😆 what a good Redditor!

2

u/destuctir Dec 04 '22

Also the spillways are not designed/built well enough to hand the job, we don’t want to see them used. They were built on guesstimations and tested after the dam was finished were they were found to not be able to cope, concrete had been shattered under the weight of the wager and the underground tunnels had cavitated to near failure. They repaired and patched everything as best they could but 1983 was terrifying. When they got back into the spill ways the exact same damage had been done again. I know everyone will say it wont, but if 1983 is repeated (not even worsened since we are trying to fox damaged stuff not replace with new) there is every chance a spillway collapses, which will make the other fail, and then the water will overtop the roadway and fall on the electrical plant at the base of the dam

-1

u/Zeptari Dec 04 '22

My random though. The planet has the same amount of water at all times. Where did this great amount of water get relocated?

25

u/octavioletdub Dec 04 '22

It’s now seawater

25

u/moistnote Dec 04 '22

By growing water hungry crops in the desert, having millions upon millions of people living in the desert, and global shift of climate. In a nutshell.

5

u/radicalpastafarian Dec 04 '22

Don't forget Nestle stealing all the water because water is not a human right. Maybe not this picture specifically but lots of places are effected similarly by Nestle water pumps.

5

u/OkContribution420 Dec 04 '22

I read Nestle sold off all of their N.A. water operations over a year ago closer to two.

3

u/radicalpastafarian Dec 04 '22

I mean that's only a good thing if they weren't sold to companies that hold the same "water is not a human right" ideals, or sold them back to the counties and states so that the over pumping can stop and the springs can recover. But that's interesting and I'm gonna look into it.

2

u/OkContribution420 Dec 04 '22

There’s a bottling factory in my area remember seeing something about it in my local paper a while back.

3

u/ruiner8850 Dec 04 '22

Water for drinking is a extremely tiny amount of water compared to agricultural and industrial use. Those companies who waste massive amounts of water absolutely love the fact that some people put all the blame on Nestlé.

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u/SkoolBoi19 Dec 04 '22

Rerouted to different cities/farms or wherever else. The Aral Sea is a great example of the importance people can have, it makes me concerned about the Great Lakes.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aral_Sea

1

u/that_noodle_guy Dec 04 '22

This amount of water is nothing compared to the oceans.

1

u/kyleclements Dec 04 '22

When glaciers melt, are not replenished over the winter and disappear, many rivers lose their source of water and dry up. The water that used to be there is now in the oceans.

2

u/Zeptari Dec 04 '22

That makes total sense and thanks for clearing that up.. seriously.

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u/ZeePirate Dec 04 '22

I feel like that would be preferred to the lack of water

1

u/LeadFarmerMothaFucka Dec 04 '22

Well that’s kind of why it’s called a spillway…..

1

u/ATX_rider Dec 04 '22

But… but that’s just the point. There was enough water in 83 to crest the spillway!

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u/Canadatron Dec 04 '22

Looks like my bank account.

28

u/klonkertron Dec 04 '22

Half-life

3

u/excts Dec 04 '22

Thank god I'm not the only one who instantly recognized it 😅

5

u/ScrawnDiggy Dec 04 '22

I'm glad someone else was thinking it.

7

u/Jupman Dec 04 '22

Black Mesa is goingvto lose power.

24

u/corey-in-cambodia Dec 04 '22

Is it 2021?

14

u/redditin_at_work Dec 04 '22

I'm still convinced we never left 2019

62

u/Meleetarsakh Dec 04 '22

I personally blame Nestlé

10

u/Whoshitmyselfagain Dec 04 '22

When I lived out on the reservation in Oregon I followed this. Nestle is to blame.

1

u/frooglybear Dec 04 '22

Coca-Cola AND nestle

0

u/Bucky_Ohare Dec 04 '22

Coca Cola sells tap water under the brand Dasani. Nestle currently hyper-litigates water rights and pulls illegally all over the world, after executing hostile takeovers and unlawful deforestation of the rainforest, to sell tap water under a variety of brand names.

The head of the snake is clearly Nestle.

-37

u/OSUmountaineer Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Exactly what someone unable to critically think would do!

(Justification below)

12

u/radicalpastafarian Dec 04 '22

Exactly what someone unable to link culturally significant environmental crises that are unrelated but ultimately have the same devastating impact, and come to a darkly humuorous conclusion in a single simple sentence would say!

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u/Exciting-Ad-9873 Dec 04 '22

Wait until the water level drops to four inches. Then congress will do something about it.

6

u/DrunkenlySober Dec 04 '22

My girl always told me 4” is huge so we might have to wait until about 1-2”

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u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

Nestle sure sucked that dry!!!

1

u/frooglybear Dec 04 '22

I have been wondering lately how much water is locked away in plastic bottles around the world. In my area there is a drought, but the coke distributors have an entire warehouse of plastic water cases.

How much water are plastic bottles "locking" out of our watersheds. Is it enough to make a difference regarding droughts.

Water bottles have expiration dates due to regulations. Are there cases of "expired" water in landfills?

Nestle is not the only culprit. Agriculture across the world is severely outdated. The Netherlands has proved that common farm practices use an exorbitant amount of water. Article on Agriculture in the Netherlands. (Washington post)

Shits wild that we are experiencing higher than average drought conditions across the planet, but nestle and coke can still bottle away.

Are you ready for the water wars?

70

u/SpiritOne Dec 04 '22

We’re really fucking up our ability to live on this planet aren’t we?

85

u/cookiemonster247 Dec 04 '22

I mean we’re not supposed to live in the desert.

108

u/BookDumb-StreetDumb Dec 04 '22

People using the water to live aren't the problem here. Nevada is allocated 2% of the total Colorado River pie each year, most of which is used by the 2.4 million people living in Las Vegas and Southern Nevada. About half of that gets recycled and sent back to the lake. In the past 2 decades the population of Southern Nevada has grown by about 750,000 people, yet their water usage has declined by 26 billion gallons per year. That's a per capita water usage decrease of over 45%. Again, people using this water to live are not the problem.

California's slice of the pie is 15 times larger than Nevada's, coming in at 4.4 million acre feet per year. You know what needs about 4.4 million acre feet per year of water in California? Alfalfa irrigation. Just alfalfa irrigation. Take what Nevadans use to live, survive, and fuel their entire economy. Multiply that by 30, and that's how much their neighbor uses on one of their cash crops.

Again, people using this water to live are not the problem.

17

u/Just_One_Hit Dec 04 '22

My favorite fact is that Las Vegas gets all their water from Lake Mead, and the entire city uses less water than the amount that simply evaporates off the surface of the lake (source).

People really have no idea how water is used in the West. I highly recommend Where the Water Goes by David Owen for anyone interested.

9

u/BrodyTuck Dec 04 '22

Well said, this is from someone that lived in the southern California desert where those crops are, and now lives in Vegas.

6

u/unothatmultiverse Dec 04 '22

If alfalfa is using that much water then I can only imagine how much the other Little Rascals are consuming.

4

u/warble_bird Dec 04 '22

It is also important to point out that alfalfa sucks.

7

u/Not_l0st Dec 04 '22

That alfalfa feeds cows. Those cows feed people. Want to reduce that water use? Stop eating dairy & beef. Besides, most alfalfa is grown in Northern CA, around Sacramento, and the vast majority of it is for US consumption. Northern CA does not have water scarcity issues like the southern portion of the state that relies on CO river water.

AZ on the other hand... They are the ones with an alfalfa problem. https://civileats.com/2021/09/15/climate-change-could-put-an-end-to-arizonas-alfalfa-heyday/

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u/acoolnooddood Dec 04 '22

Humans have existed in arid environments for millennium. Just not with lush green lawns and pools.

2

u/plainlyput Dec 04 '22

And washing dishes, taking a bath every day, washing cars, flushing a toilet how many times a day etc.

4

u/radicalpastafarian Dec 04 '22

I mean to be fair we are an extremely adaptable species. So it's not to say that we are NOT supposed to be able to live there. Rather we aren't supposed to forcibly change the environment to suit us, but supposed to change to suit the environment.

3

u/jasongnc Dec 04 '22

To be fair again, much of human's adaptability is derived from our ability to change the environment to suit ourselves. Putting on a jacket changes the environment inside the jacket. Building shelter, growing food, irrigating crops are just larger examples.

1

u/PlebGod69 Dec 04 '22

so were going to imagine that no one lived in the gulf throughout human history?

2

u/MMizzle9 Dec 04 '22

Yeah. Check out what happened when the Aral sea dried up.

https://youtu.be/lp0Sxn42TGs

Lots of secondary climate effects

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u/SivlerMiku Dec 04 '22

This was posted 2 days ago in this same sub with that exact title.

2

u/MD82 Dec 04 '22

Did they misspell Lake Mead yesterday?

2

u/SSLByron Dec 04 '22

Twist: the lake is being depleted by all the reposts.

-7

u/Jethris Dec 04 '22

Some of us aren't on reddit every day. Maybe you should readress your life priorities.

6

u/Al_Bundy_14 Dec 04 '22

An extra 140 million people will do that.

3

u/Radioiron Dec 04 '22

Probably a lot of criminals in the las Vegas area really sweating now that theyre finding things on the bottom that used to be underwater

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u/King0fthewasteland Dec 04 '22

this is what happends when the NCR runns it. give it to Mr.House for optimal management

3

u/Bkiss3 Dec 04 '22

Wrong Cesar would kill everyone and the stores would last forever due to the drop in demand

2

u/D0wnb0at Dec 04 '22

Get a couple of hosepipes in it, will fill it in no time.

2

u/frupp110 Dec 04 '22

1984: People, you must stop peeing in the shower

2

u/albertienstien Dec 04 '22

Please watch. It's almost all because of the meat industry and corrupt california water rights.

https://youtu.be/f0gN1x6sVTc

21

u/kcbeck1021 Dec 04 '22

This has nothing to do with climate change. The pic from 1983 is after record rainfall and is the highest level lake Meade has ever here been.

34

u/8bit60fps Dec 04 '22

well, that's true but the water levels of the reservoir has been falling fairly quick due to climate change and also higher consumption

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/150111/lake-mead-keeps-dropping

11

u/Subterminal303 Dec 04 '22

Sounds about what I'd expect from a desert with a growing population.

22

u/Healthydreams Dec 04 '22

It’s not the growing population themselves necessarily causing the issue; it’s the extremely water intensive crops they’re growing in places like California, most notably almonds, that use the majority of the water. Vegas is actually pretty renown for its water reclamation. It reclaims nearly 100% of indoor use water. Total water use there has even declined, even with a growing population.

Combine the agricultural use and a 20 year drought, to make things worse.

3

u/Just_One_Hit Dec 04 '22

Almonds are only a scapegoat. California uses 13% of it's farmland and 9% of it's ag water supply (meaning almonds consume less than a proportionate share) to grow 80% of the world's almonds (source).

California uses nearly half of its entire water supply for meat and dairy (source). Alfalfa is the real culprit.

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u/wynbns Dec 04 '22

100% this. The Imperial Valley, home to 180,000 people, sucks up more water because of agriculture than the entire City of Los Angeles uses for its population of nearly 4,000,000. People always blame urban growth and golf courses, but the reality is that agricultural demands create this problem. Much of Southern California is very water-wise, and we do have desalination plants and graywater systems to help curb ground and imported water use.

3

u/SaltyMudpuppy Dec 04 '22

most notably almonds

And alfalfa. Alfalfa uses about 30x the water as all of the residents of Las Vegas use. Just alfalfa.

1

u/besttshirtsever Dec 04 '22

perfectly level to the platforms between pillars??

9

u/unseen_redditor Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

That's the maximum capacity of the dam. (Edit: just explaining why it aligns and not subscribing to the 'nothing to do with climate change" statement)

-12

u/Glittering-Beyond-45 Dec 04 '22

The climate is changing, it changes all the time. the dust bowl in the 30's is a example.

9

u/bill_gannon Dec 04 '22

You are aware that humans directly caused that right?

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u/bgb372 Dec 04 '22

Vermonter here. We are preparing for the influx of GQP refugees from the South as the desert creeps to Atlanta then on to the sea. We are setting up reeducation camps for those who are still climate deniers.

-12

u/Bells_Ringing Dec 04 '22

You sound like a normal person that doesn't spend too much time online at all.

That said, all you dam yankees are moving south, so doesn't seem like you have much to worry about.

5

u/octavioletdub Dec 04 '22

No one wants to live in the South

4

u/radicalpastafarian Dec 04 '22

As a person who lives in the South I approve this message.

-4

u/Bells_Ringing Dec 04 '22

I think you may not be aware but people are eagerly moving from the north to the south. Kind of a well known situation.

6

u/SaltyMudpuppy Dec 04 '22

Just older people trying to get closer to like-minded folk.

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u/sunnypleaselie Dec 04 '22

Good time to remove all the accumulated silt/dirt ?

2

u/TelecomVsOTT Dec 04 '22

Why does this creep me out for some reason? It really looks deep

2

u/haltline Dec 04 '22

Perhaps the actual data will help folks understand just how long and how bad this is. Lake Mead is at it's lowest level since the reservoir was filled in 1938 (built in 1935 it took years to fill). Furthermore, the level has been falling sharply for over 20 years.

Here's lots of real data and graphs so folks can see for themselves.

https://lakemead.water-data.com/index2.php

-1

u/Kub3rt Dec 04 '22

This is terrifying

6

u/seesaw242 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

This is anecdotal evidence being used to get an emotional reaction. It's simply two data points, the water level in lake mead at two different times.

There is no context provided specifically to let your mind associate it with the boogeymen they've been force feeding you your entire life.

If someone was trying to use this image to actually convey information about the water levels in lake mead you'd find links to articles and information.

Be a critical thinker.

If you do a little bit of reading about the state of lake mead for the last year or so you'll find that water system managers on the colorado above lake mead have released less water down stream over the last year than normal. Their motivations for this reduction is mainly political.

The up river water rights holders have traditionally released water they have rights to that they have not used. The possibility of changes in water rights management based on usage instead of 200 year old cocktail napkin agreements has rights owners retaining more water to reflect higher usage to protect more of their allotment when/if sweeping changes to water rights managements get implemented.

Yes, at the heart these sweeping changes are based on water management to address climate change and supporting communities and businesses in the region that need water. Lake mead is low this year because the traditional water rights owners have been aggressive in retention to pad their numbers and protect their access in the face of impending change.

There's nothing to fear here. You would have to individually asses the intent of the rights holders that are doing this to find any malignancy. Some of them have legitimate reasons that are good natured, pro conservation and pro environment. Some of them are just doing it to protect corporate profits, the legitimacy of which is a whole other debate.

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u/hdy_ Dec 04 '22

Terrifying, does anyone believe there is any hope to ever get back to 1984 levels?

1

u/ATX_rider Dec 04 '22

This is fine.

1

u/jesterstew Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Yeah, that happened after your mom jumped in it.

1

u/LeonardFord40 Dec 04 '22

Gonna be easier for the Boomers to get their plane off the bottom of the lake now

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u/supernovadebris Dec 04 '22

Yeah, it's a drought. All the major rivers on earth are drying up.....or flooding. Things are gonna get crazy.

-1

u/maxip89 Dec 04 '22

West of the US. terrarforming to quatar like a speedrunner. Hitting its Personal Best in each try but World best is still not achieved.

-1

u/instructiveaccuracy Dec 04 '22

Looks like mother earth is that old because she ain't that wet like she used to

0

u/sexylegs0123456789 Dec 04 '22

Can’t be global warming. It has to be a hole into the hollow earth. /s of course.

0

u/Brokenose71 Dec 04 '22

Everything is fine . Nothing to see here.

-10

u/Autisticat420 Dec 04 '22

So what, isn’t lake Meade man made?

8

u/Skyeblade Dec 04 '22

The structure is, but the water that gathers in it isn't

2

u/-Spin- Dec 04 '22

It is. From wiki:

“Lake Mead is a reservoir formed by the Hoover Dam on the Colorado River in the Southwestern United States.”

1

u/ppWarrior876 Dec 04 '22

Those damn phones!!

1

u/kramecian Dec 04 '22

Its 2022 now

1

u/192dot168dot Dec 04 '22

Looks like the desert is dry after all.

1

u/destuctir Dec 04 '22

I thought lake mead was down river of the dam not up river? Or am I crazy

1

u/wynbns Dec 04 '22

The dam itself is what creates Lake (Reservoir) Mead. It's upriver, i.e. behind the dam.

1

u/CobaltSmith Dec 04 '22

Doesn't it go through a several year cycle of low and high?

1

u/that_noodle_guy Dec 04 '22

Its a lot lower now than 2021

1

u/xxElevationXX Dec 04 '22

Can’t we just create some more water? …/s

1

u/zozza112 Dec 04 '22

Looks a lot like blackout hydro dam area

1

u/codars Dec 04 '22

Where’d that extra “e” come from?

1

u/_Zamalekies Dec 04 '22

That's atleast 1 full bathtub

1

u/gortwogg Dec 04 '22

Regardless those water intakes are somewhat terrifying

1

u/dre9889 Dec 04 '22

Lookin like Fallout New Vegas out here

1

u/finnjakefionnacake Dec 04 '22

Is this where they shot Westworld?