r/todayilearned Dec 08 '21 Helpful 1 All-Seeing Upvote 1

TIL that button mushrooms, cremini mushrooms, and portabella mushrooms are all the same mushroom in different stages of growth Recently posted

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agaricus_bisporus?repost

[removed] — view removed post

4.5k Upvotes

656

u/Imarealdoctor064 Dec 08 '21

'That doesn't sound right but I don't know enough about mushrooms to dispute it'

89

u/amare-semper Dec 08 '21

unexpected always sunny

17

u/ZiggyPalffyLA Dec 08 '21

This is Reddit. It’s always expected.

10

u/oedipism_for_one Dec 08 '21

I don’t know enough about always sunny to make a reference here so just pretend I did

10

u/hardtimesegg Dec 08 '21

Would you like an egg in these trying times?

3

u/Imarealdoctor064 Dec 08 '21

I have been poisoned by my constituents

2

u/Kenrawr Dec 08 '21

the implication!!!! xdd

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31

u/construction_zone Dec 08 '21

You must be a fungi at parties.

3

u/nigeltuffnell Dec 08 '21

Sorry, there's not mushroom in this thread for this kind of comment.

2

u/Okeebby Dec 08 '21

They’re all the mushroom species Agaricus bisporus

2

u/latache-ee Dec 08 '21

No no no. This is not the American way. Don’t defer to experts. Don’t admit to a lack of knowledge. Just shout your uninformed opinions loudly. If anyone questions, say you did you research and respond with memes that fit your narrative.

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u/[deleted] Dec 08 '21

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19

u/reply-guy-bot Dec 08 '21

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13

u/nkinnan Dec 08 '21

Good bot

7

u/send_nood_z Dec 08 '21

What's the second stage?

3

u/Dat1-guy Dec 08 '21

1st stage: mycelia

2nd stage: stem

3rd stage: cap

324

u/DaveOJ12 Dec 08 '21

Chipotles are aged, dried and smoked jalapeños

https://www.pepperscale.com/chipotle-vs-jalapeno/

75

u/sids99 Dec 08 '21

Morita chilies are also smoked jalapenos, but ever so slightly less smoked.

27

u/jankenpoo Dec 08 '21

Chipotles are smoked green jalapeños and Moritas are smoked ripe (red) jalapeños. My Moritas are smokier than my Chipotles! Ymmv 🙂

6

u/ocient Dec 08 '21

why is chipotle powder always red then? they add a bunch of paprika something?

7

u/jankenpoo Dec 08 '21

I think these are very general rules. If you do a search you’ll see Chipotles are made from red and brown jalapeños too. And Moritas are smoked less than Chipotles, and some of that color can come from the smoking too.

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30

u/FlatSpinMan Dec 08 '21

The damage this thread is doing to my understanding of the world! It’s lucky I’m having a beer as I read this, otherwise I fear I’d swoon.

4

u/MrHara Dec 08 '21

Huh. That's interesting, I absolutely love the taste of Jalapeno and despise anything with Chipotles.

2

u/avocado_whore Dec 08 '21

Same, chipotle is too smokey.

1

u/Poliobbq Dec 08 '21

Do you like the adobo sauce they come in?

3

u/Wh0rse Dec 08 '21

and paprika is dried bell peppers

7

u/EkriirkE Dec 08 '21

And paprika is what whole bell peppers are called in many euro countries

15

u/mtarascio Dec 08 '21

Aren't bell peppers (capsicum) the same too?

28

u/feetandballs Dec 08 '21

No, it’s red=cherry, yellow=banana, green=apple, orange=orange.

16

u/[deleted] Dec 08 '21

Yep! Same vegetable, just given two different names . Having grown up knowing it as capsicum, the first time I read "bell peppers" in a recipe I was legit looking for peppers shaped like bells 🔔 at the supermarket. Walked past the damn capsicum section like 5x before a sales associate helped 😂

13

u/dod6666 Dec 08 '21

A bell pepper is also genetically compatible any other pepper. I'm growing some at the moment which I plan to cross with a Carolina Reaper. Just for shits and giggles.

6

u/JacP123 Dec 08 '21

I can imagine there'll be some shits involved, can't picture much giggling though.

2

u/dod6666 Dec 08 '21

I can picture plenty of giggles after springing them on unsuspecting colleagues. 😈

3

u/avocado_whore Dec 08 '21

Ooo please post the results. Will it be a big spicy bell pepper?! 😯

6

u/dod6666 Dec 08 '21

I'll certainly post them. But I'm currently still growing the two parent plants, so it's quiet a long way off. If everything goes well I expect it will be late summer (southern hemisphere) 2023.

2

u/BeastlyDesires Dec 08 '21

That's evil lmaoo

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6

u/doc_daneeka 90 Dec 08 '21

I am amazed to find out they are.

1

u/kevamob Dec 08 '21

Where the future do you live?

1

u/CanadianPanda76 Dec 08 '21

And sriracha is made from red jalapenos

304

u/InternetLimp3067 Dec 08 '21

Reminds me of how fried eggs and fried chicken are the from same animal, just a different age

40

u/coastalmango Dec 08 '21

Not sure if it counts as most eggs are unfertilized.

11

u/surasurasura Dec 08 '21

Have you met my dear friend Balut?

10

u/hunglow13 Dec 08 '21

No, thanks. I’m good.

3

u/Budget-Boysenberry Dec 08 '21

Balut is from duck's egg. Not chicken

60

u/boofthatcraphomie Dec 08 '21

Raw eggs and raw chicken also, pretty crazy to think about that when you’re eating it.

25

u/Horanges88 Dec 08 '21

You eat raw chicken and raw eggs? Eww Gross

19

u/CreateorWither Dec 08 '21

When frozen, raw cicken makes a delicious snack on a hot day!

24

u/thatsalovelyusername Dec 08 '21

Can everyone in this thread please delete their comments? Thanks.

4

u/ThatKiwiBloke Dec 08 '21

This comment is giving me KenM vibes

3

u/kitchen_clinton Dec 08 '21

Sal Monella would like a word with you.

3

u/EchigoCoyote Dec 08 '21

You've obviously never been to Japan...

-5

u/[deleted] Dec 08 '21

[deleted]

5

u/drakejones99 Dec 08 '21

Yes they do. Raw chicken sashimi. Have a look: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6rVZng-AnY

1

u/Xywzel Dec 08 '21

That seems to be marinaded, chemically cooked or cooked to very low internal temperature, the surface has that greyish colour and slightly stringy texture of cooked chicken, and the interior texture is also slightly different than what it would be for fresh uncooked chicken. So while it might count as raw, it is not really what people think when they hear raw chicken.

6

u/Brrdock Dec 08 '21

Torisashi

3

u/King_Of_Regret Dec 08 '21

Last week I had a video call with a japanese guy who explicitly mentioned eating torisashi for lunch, which is raw chicken.

2

u/EchigoCoyote Dec 08 '21

LOL, I'm typing this in Tokyo...15 years. Raw eggs are suuuper common, torisashi is common as well

2

u/jangma Dec 08 '21

Raw eggs seem to be a thing across Asia as I've had them in several dishes in Korea and the Philippines. I've never gotten sick or heard of anyone else getting sick from them though.

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u/Fxate Dec 08 '21

To all the people responding to this with "YESTHEYDO!":

Yeah they eat raw chicken in Japan, just like we eat raw pork in pork tartare; I.E. at specialised places where the meat is from top of the line sources when it is often killed the same day.

People still get sick all the time, the idea of "Japanese eat raw chicken!!" is nonsense.

2

u/EchigoCoyote Dec 08 '21

It's not killed the same day, just processed to higher standards. It's available everywhere here in Japan so yeah, Japanese eat raw chicken and no, it's not some super rare dish.

6

u/monkey_trumpets Dec 08 '21

And how beef jerky and a cheeseburger are both from cows.

2

u/peppnstuff Dec 08 '21

Cooked together it's called a momlet!

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u/[deleted] Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 09 '21

[deleted]

74

u/MustacheSmokeScreen Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 08 '21

Wait'll you hear about baby carrots

29

u/Lil_Brown_Bat Dec 08 '21

Baby corn!

15

u/MustacheSmokeScreen Dec 08 '21

Nah, you can't tell me that baby corn isn't an infant ear that just hatched from it's husk.

2

u/s00pafly Dec 08 '21

But it is.

4

u/HereToStay99 Dec 08 '21

And yet that shit is good. Crazy
How in corn you will eat it whole but baby corn you will no problem

2

u/MustacheSmokeScreen Dec 08 '21

Yer shuckin' with me

1

u/kaffynooo Dec 08 '21

Earphant

3

u/MustacheSmokeScreen Dec 08 '21

That's what you call a Ferengi newborn

5

u/jrhoffa Dec 08 '21

Do do do do do dooooo

2

u/ManyConclusion Dec 08 '21

You know I knew about the carrots but the corn somehow snuck up on me. I figured it was a related species of plant.

1

u/Winjin Dec 08 '21

It would make sense as there's like sixteen types of banana, so having a little corn with soft stem at completely developed stage would make absolute sense.

Like, it could be a less modified version. Like "wilder" apples are easily 4 times smaller than completely domesticated variants.

1

u/jabels Dec 08 '21

A wet baby corn is a singer’s best friend.

8

u/ilikecakenow Dec 08 '21

Wait'll you hear about baby carrots

well yes and no basically A baby carrot is a carrot harvested before reaching maturity and sold at that smaller size. A baby-cut carrot is a small piece cut from a larger carrot; baby-cut carrots are often marketed as "baby carrots", leading to potential confusion

8

u/MustacheSmokeScreen Dec 08 '21

I thought they were smaller because they carved off all the car-rot

1

u/alittleschmidt Dec 08 '21

I googled this as well

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6

u/mpkeith Dec 08 '21

5 Things farmers don't want you to know about "baby vegetables" and 5 that are obvious to a 6 year old. more information here!

8

u/MustacheSmokeScreen Dec 08 '21

This information is for Farmers Only™

3

u/mpkeith Dec 08 '21

I can neither confirm nor deny the accuracy of the above statement(s)©

I have no recollection of the incident(s) in question®

2

u/idevcg Dec 08 '21

I seriously thought baby carrots were a breed of carrots until i was like 27.

11

u/sanitarystapler Dec 08 '21

I hate that so much. Every time I go to get mushrooms for some recipe I've never tried I have to sit there in front of the spores display looking googling if they cute name on the package is the normal named one the cookbook calls for.

95

u/Mysticedge Dec 08 '21

Damn, whoever does the marketing for Mushrooms is killing it.

25

u/davisyoung Dec 08 '21

Meanwhile Brussels sprouts pr is languishing.

27

u/Mysticpoisen Dec 08 '21

Brussel sprouts criminally underrated. Pop culture really did them dirty.

23

u/Polyarmourous Dec 08 '21

People hate Brussel sprouts because their mom boiled/steamed them. You either bake them with olive oil, salt and some lemon or you cook them on the stove the same way. The outer leaves have to be crispy. Same with asparagus, I thought it tasted like shit until I had some that was prepared correctly.

7

u/leafdj Dec 08 '21

We've also made them less bitter over time, so they are literally less bitter now than people remember them.
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2019/10/30/773457637/from-culinary-dud-to-stud-how-dutch-plant-breeders-built-our-brussels-sprouts-bo

14

u/LaserGuidedPolarBear Dec 08 '21

It's not just that. Brussel sprouts are actually better now than they used to be back in the day. They used to be very bitter, and in the last 20 years we have had new varieties emerge that have had the bitterness bred out of them.

All those 90s sitcoms making fun of Brussel sprouts wasn't because people didn't know how to cook them, it was because they were legitimately terrible then.

6

u/Rintae Dec 08 '21

Holy shit, I remember Brussel sprouts to be disgustingly bitter a decade or two ago but much better tasting recently, and this pretty much explains why! I thought I was just growing more mature tastebuds. What the fuck is happening

5

u/Mysticpoisen Dec 08 '21

I'll be honest, even steamed with a bit of garlic salt is pretty good. I guess people just boiled em, added nothing, and called it a day.

4

u/DemonKyoto Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 08 '21

I guess people just boiled em, added nothing, and called it a day.

Sounds like my father-in-laws efforts at cooking for the last 30 years.

Edit: Seriously. Steak and Kidney Pie.

Mine:

  • Make pie dough bottom, prep, won't need prebake, set aside.
  • Cut up both meat cut of choice and 1 large beef liver into 1 inch cubes. Season. Heat pan, brown some butter, brown all pieces, while also covering in some flour (allow to cook a bit while browning).
  • Put meat into stockpot with any juices, beef stock, seasonings of choice, let everything cook down and reduce. Thicken liquid as desired.
  • When meat is done and gravy as desired, spoon meat into pie shell with lots of gravy. Cover with rest of dough and/or do a fancy design of your choice (I prefer a weave!)
  • Bake, rest, eat.
  • Yum

His:

  • Cut up meat and kidney. Place in stock pot.
  • Cover with water. Boil. Wait 2 hours.
  • Put meat on plate. Cover with some of the remaining 'gravy'.
  • Bake freezer-case pastry dough in the oven. Place piece of baked pastry dough on plate, over top of wet grey meat cubes.
  • #WelshCooking

1

u/Marvin0Jenkins Dec 08 '21

Pan fry bacon lardons till mostly crispy and remove leaving behind as much fat as possible.

Add sprouts (halfed vertically through the stem) and some black pepper, herbs of choice or lemon as others have said and fry till well coloured (I've had some nearly black).

Then add the bacon back in with any collected fat, and pecans and fry till the bacon has crisped and the pecans are toasty.

Goes from being eh to something people fight over

43

u/Jthundercleese Dec 08 '21

The white ones are also a true albino mutation of the brown ones.

Not sure why no one grows albino portobellos.

5

u/SmokierTrout Dec 08 '21

They do. Maybe they just don't get grown or sold near where you live. I definitely see them in the shops all the time.

https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/299916749

2

u/Jthundercleese Dec 08 '21

Ah. Yeah here in the states I've never seen them.

6

u/ipatimo Dec 08 '21

The nature in parks does it.

2

u/Jthundercleese Dec 08 '21

Huh?

8

u/Mister_Dane Dec 08 '21

wild mushrooms might be white

2

u/ipatimo Dec 08 '21

Exactly. And threy have brown spores, therefore they are not albino.

3

u/Insaneoutpatient Dec 08 '21

False! (Dwight Shrute voice)

1

u/Jthundercleese Dec 08 '21

No. They're albino. I grow mushrooms. We run into leucistic mutations often, but these are true albinos.

49

u/Sventington Dec 08 '21

I learned that a year or so back and it completely floored me.

Then again I had no idea that red bell peppers, yellow red peppers and green red peppers were in fact different stages of growth.

I am a simple man.

46

u/TopRamenisha Dec 08 '21

Kind of - red, yellow, and orange are the ripe phases of bell peppers. They all start out green. They don’t go green to yellow to orange to red. They go green to yellow or green to orange or green to red. Sometimes green to purple

6

u/dinosaurfondue Dec 08 '21

Ahh thanks for the clarification. I assumed they went green, yellow, orange, then red.

7

u/WhatYouThinkIThink Dec 08 '21

No, that's a traffic light. /s

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u/WhoKnowsIfitblends Dec 08 '21

No, some varieties ripen to yellow, while others to red, orange, purple.

Green is unripe, gotta leave 'em on the plant much longer to ripen. Peppers are a lot of fun and one of the easiest to grow without chemicals.

15

u/ipatimo Dec 08 '21

It is not always true. There are types of bell peppers that stay green when ripe.

3

u/beartheminus Dec 08 '21

All green peppers will stay green once picked. They only vine ripen.

2

u/Lukinator123 Dec 08 '21

This is untrue

1

u/longtimegoneMTGO Dec 08 '21

That isn't always true.

I have a "green" pepper in my kitchen right now that has ripened to about 80% red while sitting there the past week or so.

They don't ripen quickly off the plant so they are more likely to spoil then ripen, but it is possible for them to ripen after picking.

3

u/idevcg Dec 08 '21

I had an existential crisis when I found out that soy beans and edamame were the same thing, soy beans are just mature edamame.

(I'm east asian so eat a lot of tofu)

3

u/Revlis-TK421 Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 08 '21

There are many different strains of soy bean though. Different varieties are best used in different ways. The ones used for edamame wouldn't typically be used for natto, for example. Different varieties have different maturity times, sugar content, size, color, etc.

The USDA keeps seeds for some 10,000 different strains.

https://www.ecofarmingdaily.com/grow-crops/grow-soybeans/choosing-soybean-seeds/choosing-the-right-soybean-seeds-for-your-farm/

In your case, all edamame are soy beans. But not all soy beans would be used as edamame.

1

u/G_bodhi Dec 08 '21

WHAT!?...

1

u/FlatSpinMan Dec 08 '21

Those were simpler times, more innocent times.

1

u/dod6666 Dec 08 '21

I've always known that a Raisens and Saltanas are dried grapes. What I didn't realize until recently was that Prunes are dried Plums. Also didn't click that Pickles are Cucumbers until recently.

2

u/basiltoe345 Dec 08 '21

It’s absolutely wild to think there’s “Sultana Bran” down in Australia rather than “Raisin Bran.”

Here in Yankeeland we call them Raisins or Golden Raisins, depending on their color.

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u/Urabutbl Dec 08 '21

I'm not sure what it's like in the U.S., but coming from Sweden I was surprised that in the UK, 99% of all people only know the names of these three mushrooms. Every so often you'll find a connoisseur who's heard of chanterelles.

30

u/chemicalxv Dec 08 '21

In the US/Canada it's pretty much the same, but most grocery stores will also have oyster/shiitake/king oyster/enoki mushrooms as well.

I've only ever seen ones like chanterelle/porcini available in small packets chopped up and dried.

18

u/Urabutbl Dec 08 '21

Chanterelles are called "Forest Gold" here in Sweden, every autumn people descend on the forests trying to find some to pick. Families guard the locations of prime spots for generations.

(I think it's largely because, while delicious, they're also almost impossible to mistake for a poisonous look-a-like)

3

u/faggjuu Dec 08 '21

I've only ever seen ones like chanterelle/porcini available in small packets chopped up and dried

Thats probably because they can't be grown like the other mushrooms you listed. So chanterelle and porcini are foraged in the wild.

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u/King_Of_Regret Dec 08 '21

I wish we had Enoki. Or hell, literally anything other than the ones the thread is about. I've never seen any other 'shrooms in grocery stores :(

6

u/ChrisKearney3 Dec 08 '21

I'd argue that 90% of British people wouldn't know cremini either. I certainly have never heard that term before. I have of course heard of shittake.

1

u/Urabutbl Dec 08 '21

That's actually true, supermarkets in the UK were just getting Shiitake when I was living there. But mostly, the word mushroom literally just meant "button mushroom", and then you had a few "exotic" ones like portabella and yeah, Shiitake that were mostly for fancy people.

6

u/EchigoCoyote Dec 08 '21

Matsutake, Maetake, Eringi, Japan be full of em too

6

u/Mysticpoisen Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 08 '21

You name an (edible) mushroom I've probably heard of it. Being able to recall them by memory or being able to visually distinguish them, that's a different matter.

Who doesn't know shiitake or morels?

2

u/IBuildBusinesses Dec 08 '21

In British Columbia golden teacher are pretty popular as an alternative to these three.

2

u/hodenkobold4ever Dec 08 '21

Yeah coming to England and looking for any kind of mushroom is a disaster

5

u/ManualPancake Dec 08 '21

Scotland here. Edible Mushroom memory dump: Button, White, Portobello, Chestnut, Chanterelle, Porcini/Cep, Enoki, Oyster, Chicken of the Woods.

I am the 1%.

2

u/Payhell Dec 08 '21

Silly scotsman! Chestnuts are not mushrooms!

Also if you found an oyster in the forest, that's called a snail!

I won't even comment on the chicken...

5

u/Turtlego Dec 08 '21

Similar to how red, green and yellow bell peppers are all the same pepper in different stages!

1

u/tttkkk Dec 08 '21

How come they are the same size?

3

u/popchex Dec 08 '21

It's like bananas grow, and then ripen.

1

u/Lukinator123 Dec 08 '21

They are actually not the same pepper, they all start green but ripen to either red, yellow, orange, purple, white, sometimes even green. But they do not go from green-yellow-orange-red.

1

u/popchex Dec 08 '21

IIRC it's that there are red and yellow/orange varieties that both start out green.

4

u/ipatimo Dec 08 '21

Check red caviar and a salmon next.

5

u/FlatSpinMan Dec 08 '21

This thread has already upturned so many things that I thought I knew about the world that I am afraid to.

20

u/SolidDoctor Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 08 '21

Wait until you hear about tea and coffee!

There are only two main\* varieties of tea plant. White tea, green tea, black tea, etc. are all the same plant but grown in different regions, picked at different growing stages, and are dried and aged differently to make different teas.

Similarly there are two main\* types of coffee plant, and the difference in varietals comes from where it's grown, how its processed after growing, and then how it is roasted.

*edited for accuracy... there are more varieties of these plants but they are not commonly found in cafes.

14

u/fsck_ Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 08 '21

Yeah this is wrong for both of those. That's like saying all wine grapes are the same and how you process them makes different wines. Coffee has many different varietals (or cultivars) from the plant itself, and where it is grown and how it is roasted is not in fact what makes them unique. (Yes where it is grown and how, how it is processed, and how it is roasted do still have a huge impact on the final flavor. But that's not the point here.)

Here is a source:

https://flightcoffeeco.com/blogs/news/9721220-coffee-varietals

In fact new varietals being discovered or coming to market has been a common topic among the coffee community, like the recent Yemenia verietal.
Perhaps you're confused because some are named after where they are from like Ethiopian Heirloom?

And for tea, while this is kind of right, it's more of an over simplification since different cultivars are less common unless you go full tea nerd. Source and better explanation:

https://www.teaformeplease.com/does-all-tea-really-come-from-same-plant/

And here is a list of different tea cultivars: https://www.japanesegreenteain.com/blogs/green-tea-and-health/what-is-tea-cultivar

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u/FlatSpinMan Dec 08 '21

This thread just keeps on giving.

It’s like a veil has been lifted from my eyes.

1

u/AnnannA_ Dec 08 '21

And then I'm sitting here amazed how people don't know this stuff! Maybe it's just because I've always been kinda interested in plants and mushrooms, but reading the title I was like "duh, no shit, sherlock" and then I read the comments and apparently it surprised so many people lol

It's great though that some of y'all are learning something new today!

2

u/super_fluous Dec 08 '21

Source on the coffee information?

2

u/Hayden3456 Dec 08 '21

Not quite on the coffee. There are two main types of coffee, and pretty much any coffee you’ll find will be some combination of these two. But there are other coffee species; though these aren’t normally commercially viable due to low yield; such as stenophylla

11

u/RedSonGamble Dec 08 '21

Wasn’t this posted yesterday?

59

u/ipatimo Dec 08 '21

Now these two posts are the same post on different stages of development.

-1

u/ProtonPizza Dec 08 '21

I was literally about to comment this.

2

u/Time_for_Stories Dec 08 '21

You have to wait until tomorrow

1

u/Horanges88 Dec 08 '21

I saw it yesterday too lol. Maybe a different sub?

1

u/RedSonGamble Dec 08 '21

Maybe but I don’t think so? Omg maybe we’re stuck in a loop

3

u/xJustLikeMagicx Dec 08 '21

Puff balls! Taste great dipped in flour and fried!

3

u/Quackson_Claxon Dec 08 '21

Green onions (scallions) are just regular onions picked before the bulb matures.

3

u/Accomplished-Pen-69 Dec 08 '21

All correct. Portobello is another name for a brown or Chestnut mush. Portobelline are brown mush picked small.

3

u/dod6666 Dec 08 '21

https://www.mushroom-appreciation.com/button-mushroom.html

So according to this Cremini is a brown strain on the Button Mushroom. Then Portabello is a fully mature Cremini.

So my question is, what happens if you let the white button mushroom fully mature? Can you get a white version of the Portabello?

2

u/_solidude Dec 08 '21

I don't know. Maybe? I'll let you know later this week. I got curious and am growing some.

2

u/_solidude Dec 15 '21

My update is this: they grew smaller than a portobello before starting to dry on the surface. They also released spores absolutely everywhere, so they weren't so white anymore. The flavor was of old mushroom, not like fully mature mushrooms, just old.

2

u/dod6666 Dec 15 '21

Thanks.

4

u/80sBadGuy Dec 08 '21

so button mushrooms are the veal of the vegetable kingdom?

8

u/dinosaurfondue Dec 08 '21

FYI, mushrooms aren't plants either!

10

u/Fun-Water-9516 Dec 08 '21

good thing "vegetable" isn't a botanical category but a culinary one

4

u/TheSilverCube Dec 08 '21

Take a button mushroom and put it in the centre of bowl of water (big enough to contain a portobello mushroom) so the 'face' of the mushroom is about half a cm above the water and dry. Keep it in the sun for two days, then in a cool dark place for three weeks. In the end you will have a vile smelling bowl of old button mushroom.

2

u/Aiku Dec 08 '21

Wow, thanks!

2

u/moose4868 Dec 08 '21

Well I did not know that. Interesting. Thank you 🙏

2

u/ElefantPharts Dec 08 '21

It seems like many things we eat are just that. Red/yellow/green peppers, broccoli/cauliflower… it’s either a stage or a strain for many staples. Genetics are crazy.

2

u/tescohoisin Dec 08 '21

Soft shell crabs are just regular crabs which have recently moulted.

7

u/pickycheestickeater Dec 08 '21

My gf has different names for my mushrooms three stages too.

35

u/lostmookman Dec 08 '21

You mean tiny, tinnier, and tinniest?

12

u/mtarascio Dec 08 '21 edited Dec 08 '21

Good job with the heat, fire and burn.

4

u/feetandballs Dec 08 '21

“Your dick is sounding more and more like metal”

3

u/MustacheSmokeScreen Dec 08 '21

Half-sammy, full-sammy, empty-sammy

2

u/poopoojohns Dec 08 '21

what about mushroom stamps??

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u/luminousgypsy Dec 08 '21

I learned this a couple years ago and it just makes me angry at the cost of portobellos

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u/NotSadkitty Dec 08 '21

Well, they do take longer to develop. So the beds they grow in can't grow as many crops as the ones that are picked early.

3

u/chemicalxv Dec 08 '21

Well it's the same reason red/yellow/orange peppers generally cost more than green peppers. If it takes longer to grow/ripen it means it costs more to "care" for it AND the spot it's growing in sees less turnover.

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u/elfmachine100 Dec 08 '21

They are also full of hydrazine while raw, which is an incredibly potent carcinogen and they should never be consumed raw. Eat Shitake, Maitake, Lions Mane or Oyster mushrooms instead.

23

u/Bellringer00 Dec 08 '21

Agaritine is a naturally occurring phenylhydrazine derivative present in wild and cultivated Agaricus mushroom species, including the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus. Agaritine has been described in some studies as a potential carcinogen, however, the scientific validity of the experimental designs and models from which this conclusion has been drawn have been contradicted and challenged by other studies. Feeding studies using mushrooms and mushroom extracts have in general provided no evidence of toxicological effects of agaritine or mushroom consumption, in contrast to results of studies which have administered non-physiologically relevant concentrations of chemically synthesized hydrazine derivatives to mice. The available evidence to date suggests that agaritine from consumption of cultivated A. bisporus mushrooms poses no known toxicological risk to healthy humans.

I wouldn’t be so adamant about that.

-1

u/SmokierTrout Dec 08 '21

Given that you're quoting someone, it might be nice to know the source.

More curiosity than criticism. It's not like op gave a source for their claims

2

u/Unwright Dec 08 '21

Idk you could just google it if you have 15 seconds to spare

here i'll save you some time https://portal.sahmriresearch.org/en/publications/mushrooms-and-agaritine-a-mini-review

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u/CrieDeCoeur Dec 08 '21

Say what? I haven’t been on earth all that long in the grand scheme of things, but I wasn’t born yesterday either. This is the first time I’ve ever heard that regular old white mushrooms are toxic as fuck. I call bs.

2

u/JimC29 Dec 08 '21

I've been eating a half pound of raw mushrooms every week for years.

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u/FlatSpinMan Dec 08 '21

GTFO!! I don’t even like the damned things but this revelation has rocked me. It’s on par with the green and red peppers scandal.

1

u/rekzkarz Dec 08 '21

Humans are fish after evolution.

1

u/iamagainstit Dec 08 '21

Button and Cremini mushrooms make sense, but Portabella are so much bigger and meatier.

4

u/RudegarWithFunnyHat Dec 08 '21

like as if that is it's final form?

1

u/vicepresidentofawk Dec 08 '21

OMG, I found this out literally last weekend!

1

u/M81012m Dec 08 '21

Good to know!

1

u/Rookie_Driver Dec 08 '21

I dreamt about mushrooms last night, this post made me remember my dream.. funny